Ojibwe Bibliography – part 7

[01-19-04]

 

 

2992.    Sterling, E. W., 1914-1967. (1956). Moses N. Adams, a missionary as Indian agent. Minnesota History, 35, 167-177, illus.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19414279

2993.   Stevenson, A. (1959). Sitting Bull: Dakota boy. New York: The Bobbs-Merrill Company.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Young Jumping Badger felt that living was an adventure, and each day brought new learnings which he would use in his later life."

2994.   Stewart, O. C. (1961). Cart-using Indians of the American Plains. Southwestern Lore, XXVI(4), 65-69.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2995.   Stickney, A. L., & University of Minnesota. Training Center for Community Programs. (1967). Minnesota Indian resources directory . Minneapolis : Training Center for Community Programs, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11798944

2996.   Stiegelbauer, S. M. (1991). The road back to the future: tradition and the involvement of elders at the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto (Canada). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin.
Abstract: The Native Canadian Centre of Toronto has formally involved a group of Elders from the reserves (reservations) in Ontario to teach their urban community about Native traditions and heritage. This community encompasses a broad range of Native backgrounds including various tribal affiliations--Mohawk, Ojibway, Creeas well as a range from little Native blood to full-blood status Indians. The Elders' Council at the Native Centre was formed to provide these city people of Native background an opportunity to learn more about their heritage from 'experts' and to begin, as one Elder put it, 'the healing process, healing the damage of the years and the city--helping people find out who they are.' In 1987, I joined the Native Canadian Centre as a volunteer and was elected to the Board of Directors. As part of a Board initiative, I became responsible for facilitating a shared research and documentation project investigating and documenting the involvement of Elders in the Native Centre--what they do, what they see their role to be, and the recommendations they might have for the Centre as a whole. This study documents the Centre's adaptation to the Elders, and vice-versa, and the ways in which Native traditions are being utilized by the Centre to express its unique heritage. Theoretically, the study addresses a number of different issues: (1) the role of tradition as a 'symbolic construction,' interpreting the past to make it more relevant to current needs; (2) the activities of the Native Centre from the perspective of pan-Indian approaches; (3) the Elders' own vision of a 'Native' community and how their activities within the Centre are addressed to that vision; and (4) the role of the research from the perspective of 'reflexive anthropology' or 'new ethnography' in which personal involvement with the situation becomes part of the process. Drawing on perspectives from folklore and anthropology, this study emphasizes the emergent nature of social relations and views culture, as well as tradition, as meaningful interpretive processes. The Native Centre and the Elders, by means of social interaction, are affirming their belief that their Native culture has the capacity to adapt and adjust to the needs of contemporary social life. The Centre is unique in its programmatic approach to this goal, an approach not without difficulties as two kinds of cultures, the traditional and the 'urban organizational' come together to create a new kind of culture, one in which both perspectives have a role.

2997.   Stiles, M. B. (1962). One among the Indians. New York: The Dial Press.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Describes the grueling tests that each young Indian boy facing manhood must deal with.  Grades 5-8."

2998.   Stock, K. S. E. (1996). The traditional land-use of the Waterhen First Nation vis-a-vis a forest management plan (Manitoba). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Abstract: For the first time in the history of the Waterhen First Nation, a traditional land-use study has been undertaken. The objectives of this study were to define specifics and general character of the traditional land-use activities in the Waterhen Resource Area and to contrast traditional land-use with third party interests. The area is located in Manitoba's Interlake Region, 320 km northwest of Winnipeg. The Anishinaabe of the Waterhen First Nation use the traditional zone between the Aspen Parkland and the Boreal Forest for a significant part of their livelihood. The complex ecosystem and the traditional land-use make this area unique. Land-use data were collected through interviews resulting in map biographies illustrating hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering activities. Proposed large-scale forestry developments threaten the traditional land-use patterns. To exemplify the potential conflict between the interests of the First Nation and those of the logging company, the Waterhen Wood Bison Project has been selected. In 1991, a wild wood bison herd was established in Waterhen Resource Area. Implementation of the proposed forest management plans imperil the successful continuance of Manitoba's wild wood bison herd. The interests of the Wood Bison Project are critically juxtaposed to the Forest Management Plan that was proposed in 1989. Potential impacts on the forest and on moose and woodland caribou habitats are discussed. The study concludes that the traditional land-use activities of the people of the Waterhen First Nation are significant to their lives and well being. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

2999.   Stockbridge Munsee Community. (1938). Constitution and by-laws of the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin approved November 18, 1937. Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  At head of title: United States, Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs.

3000.   Stockbridge Munsee Community. (1938). Corporate charter of the Stockbridge Munsee Community of Wisconsin ratified May 21, 1938. Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  At head of title: United States, Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs.

3001.   Stone-Gordon, T. (1993). Woman of the Sound the Stars Make Rushing Through the Sky: a literary biography of Jane Johnston Schoolcraft (Native Americans). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: Jane Johnston Schoolcraft has been treated historically as the first wife of Indian Agent and ethnologist Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, while her position as the first known Metis woman poet and short story writer to participate in the Euro-American publishing tradition has been completely ignored. This thesis looks at the literary and personal lives of Jane Johnston Schoolcraft by recreating the cultural context in which Metis women of the Old Northwest were taught Euro-American ideals of literature and femininity in the decline of the fur trade in the first half of the nineteenth-century. It also looks at Henry Schoolcraft's adherence to the notions of 'savagism' and his influences on her writing. The study finds that Jane Schoolcraft embraced the nineteenth-century Euro-American 'cult of true womanhood' ideology. This and a desire to interpret Ojibway culture favorably to Euro-Americans were her primary motivations for producing written literature.

3002.   Storm, S. G. (1985). Indian Hills Ski Resort : a recreational playground, Walker, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22976925. Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (leaf [34]).

3003.   . (1984). W. StrangeTribal civil jurisdiction  . Seattle.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 41861800. Submitted to Professor Ralph Johnson for Law B584. Indian Law Seminar, 1984. Includes bibliographical references.

3004.   . (1990). R. Strickland, S. Herzberg, & S. R. OwensKeeping Our Word: Indian Treaty Rights and Public Responsibilities  (pp. 19-20).
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

3005.   Stripp, Hollister, & Dirrim. (1967).  The Rise and Development of Western Civilization.  John Wiley & Sons.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3006.   Stromberg, J. S. (1963). Some problems in Minnesota Chippewa acculturation. Minnesota Academy of Science. Proceedings, 31(1), 18-23.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3007.   Stromberg, J. S. (1962). The Nett Lake Indian reservation village: some sociological contributions to the study of acculturation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 17904172

3008.   Strong, J. (1957). James Strong, et al., plaintiffs, v. United States of America, defendant, docket no. 13-M ; Robert Dominic, et al., plaintiffs, v. United States of America, defendant, docket no. 40-K ; and, Red Lake Band, et al., plaintiffs, v. United States of America, defendant, docket no. 18-Q : (consolidated for hearing with dockets 146, 15-M, and 29-K) : petitioners' proposed findings and brief  . Escanaba, Mich.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31036228
Abstract: Title from cover. At head of title: Before the Indian Claims Commission. No evidence was introduced on behalf of claimants in 18-Q. (Introductory statement).

3009.   . (1979). P. Strong, & L. AgardReminiscences of Peter Strong, Red Lake band of Chippewa, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22906383

3010.   Strong, W. D. (Anthropological Consultant).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995), worked for the B.I.A. at Red Lake

3011.   Stucki, B. (1932). Benjamin Stucki collection. Archive/Manuscript Control.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: Wisconsin Collection 44. Location: 5/1g box 7. Benjamin Stucki's sermons from his days as the pastor of the Indian Mission Church in Black River Falls, Wisconsin. Also included is a copy of the book "Winning the Winnebago," by Arthur V. Cassilman, secretary of the Department of Missionary Education Reformed Church in the United States. Photocopy

3012.   Stuecher, U. (1984). Training project for Indian school liaison and support personnel in special education .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13244250. Caption title. "June 1984." Bibliography: p. 18.

3013.   Stuecher, U., & Minnesota. Dept. of Education. (1991). Positive Indian parenting a reference manual in support of Minnesota Indian parents and families . St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26757943 ... accession: 25085162

3014.   Stuhr, P. L. (1988). Cultural conflict: viewed through the art of the contemporary Wisconsin Indians. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Wisconsin--Madison.
Abstract: The main purpose of this descriptive and interpretive study is the identification of the contemporary Wisconsin Indian artists. Three categories: Traditionalist, Derivative and Modern were established to facilitate explanation of the arts/crafts currently being produced by the Wisconsin Indians and the values embodied in these forms. The study investigates where, why, how and for whom their art/craft forms are being produced. Ethnographic interviews with seventy-one artists were conducted according to methodological techniques presented by Popkewitz and Tabachnick (1981), Spradley (1979) and George and Louise Spindler (1973). Through these interviews a culture conflict was exposed. Analysis of the data revealed differing values systems and beliefs espoused by the artists who comprise the Traditionalist, Derivative and Modern artists. The Traditionalist and the Derivative artists' work is based upon and embodies the hereditary values and beliefs of the contemporary Wisconsin Indians (Suhr, 1983; Wax, 1971). The goal of these two groups of artists is to ensure the continuance of these values and the Indian communities. The Modern artists' art is imbued with the values of the Anglo culture which are reflected in the quest for wealth, success, and upward mobility (Chapman, 1978). The main goal of the Modern artists' is to gain individual fame and monetary success in the art fields. These goals are in direct conflict with those of the Traditionalist and Derivative Wisconsin Indian artists. The discovery of how the Indian artists develop their skills and talents, whether it be learned cultural apprenticeship or acquired in private or public schools has significance for the teaching of art in Anglo schools (Stuhr, 1986). A different perspective on teaching methods is presented after looking at the traditional Indian methods of teaching/learning their arts and crafts.

3015.   Sullivan, J. L. (1979). Perceptions of Students' Self and Ideal Self by Teachers and Students at the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Dakota, Microfiche copy.
Notes: ERIC NO: ED244759
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Using a measurement of self-concept, researchers explored the different attitudes, value systems, and beliefs of a group of Indian students and their teachers at the three elementary schools on the Red Lake Reservation, an area where schools have operated sporadically since 1843. Almost all of the participating students were members of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa (Ojibway) Indians, who traditionally have valued harmonious cooperation with man, nature, and the gods. Researchers administered the Piers-Harris Children's Self Concept Scale twice to 251 third, fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students and to 15 teachers. On the first test, students were asked to respond as if describing themselves; and teachers, as if describing an average student in their classroom. On the second test, students and teachers were asked to respond as would an "ideal" student. Students and teachers differed in their perceptions on three test clusters (appearance, intellectual, school status) and on the total scores. They also gave differing responses for an "ideal" student. Student self-ideal discrepancy scores were correlated to certain variables. Low self-esteem was significantly related to poor achievement, age, grade level, and percentage of Indian blood. (SB)

3016.   Summerfield, J. (1834). Sketch of grammar of the Chippeway language : to which is added a vocabulary of some of the most common words . Cazenovia [N.Y.]: J.F. Fairchild.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

3017.   Sundstrom, L. (1991). Rock Art of the Southern Black Hills: A Contextual Approach.  Garland Publishing, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3018.   Sutter, V. J. (1996). American Indian mental health program implementation issues: an exploratory study. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Oklahoma.
Abstract: American Indians have a unique historical and legal relationship with the United States government that is best described as a government-to-government relationship. Most federal programs for Indians are administered by the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs. The federal health programs, however, are administered chiefly by the Indian Health Service (IHS). In addressing the health needs of Indian people, the IHS admits mental health has lagged behind. In 1993, the IHS called substance abuse the number one health problem among American Indians. Issues associated with substance abuse are chief among the mental health  problems addressed by American Indian mental health programs.  This exploratory study develops an unusual approach to understanding implementation issues in mental health programs for the American Indian. Questionnaire data for this study were sought from four American Indian communities representing diverse societal and cultural contexts: Saulte Ste. Marie, Michigan; Second Mesa, Arizona; Warm Springs, Oregon; and Muskogee, Oklahoma. The overall rate of return for the questionnaire was 64 percent. Mental health policy development does not appear to be of significant interest to respondents. Policy guidelines for the mental health programs are considered culturally relevant. However, over one-half of the respondents do not believe Indian people have a role in policy development. Also, the data provide support for policy recommendations to include more American Indian cultural input in the evaluation process for the Indian mental health programs. The respondents do not believe evaluation data are translated into  meaningful recommendations for future American Indian mental health program development. The administrative findings appear to show a more positive trend for the recognition of cultural issues by the personnel of mental health programs than previously believed by some authors and professionals. The respondents in the study believe there are no on-going efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of the traditional healers providing services, even though the views of the traditional healers are not opposed to the delivery of the mental health program services. The respondents believe the tribal leaders are not interested in understanding the dynamics of mental health problems. Also, tribal leaders apparently do not communicate well with the general tribal population in regard to community mental health problems. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

3019.   Svangsopakul, V. (1998). The dancing colors: the Anishnabek's powwow regalia (video documentary, Michigan). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: This paper s a supplement to a 33-minute video production thesis, The Dancing Colors: The Anishnabek's Powwow Regalia. This production thesis intends to use video documentary as a medium to enhance the audience's knowledge of a Native American group, the Anishnabek. The target audience of this documentary are Thai people, who are likely have misperceptions about Native Americans, particularly as the result of Western movies. The program presents the essence of the Anishnabek's contemporary arts, life, and culture as exemplified through the powwow dance  regalia. As a 'living museum', the powwow and its dance regalia contain many symbolic representations of Native American spirituality which are relatively unknown by people of other cultures.  This paper and the video capture both the tribal symbols as well as the personal symbols of individual dancers in the powwow.

3020.   Svedarsky, W. D. (1992). Biological inventory of a multi-purpose flood control impoundment in northwest Minnesota and potentials for nongame and game bird management : final report on the cooperative agreements between The Soil Conservation Service (U.S.D.A.), The Red Lake Watershed District, The Nongame Program of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and The University of Minnesota, Northwest Agricultural Experiment Station, Crookston . Crookston, MN : University of Minnesota, Northwest Agricultural Experiment Station.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 32254765

3021.   Swan, D. C. (1998). Forms and Acts: Beaded Shoulder Bags From the Great Lakes Region. Gilcrease Journal, 6(1), 48.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: The collective spirit of a people takes visible form in the characteristic media which they imbue with depth of meaning. Among the Indian people of the Great Lakes, a vital expression is the wearable art of the beaded bandolier bag.

3022.   Swan, M. (1990 April). Ojibwe News, p. 5.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
a description of Viking settlements around the turn of the millennium

3023.   Swanson, A. (1975). Warroad natives, the Chippewa . Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

3024.   Swanton, J. R. (1953). A letter to anthropologists. Journal of Parapsychology, 17(2), 144-152. 1 ref.
Notes: Source: Parapsychology Abstracts International, Dec 1986:2
Abstract: The author terms this his Swan Song directed at fellow anthropologists, delivered because he believes a significant revolution which is of great concern to anthropologists is taking place quietly but surely in a related branch of science, parapsychology, which is not being met in an honest and truly scientific manner by anthropologists.  He cites past examples of scientific prejudice against new scientific findings and cautions anthropologists not to behave similarly.  Adhesion to current orthodoxy is always more profitable than dissent but the future belongs to dissenters.  Prejudice and cowardice in the presence of the status quo are the twin enemies of prograss at all times and of that "dispassionate method" in which science consists." --DT/R.A.W.

3025.   Swanton, J. R. (1930). Some neglected data bearing on Cheyenne, Chippewa, and Dakota history. American Anthropologist, XXXII, 156-160.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3026.   Swift, E. M. (1996). Brave one. (Washington Capitals' left wing Chris Simon). Sports Illustrated, 85(25), 72-76.
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract:  Abstract: Capitals' left wing Chris Simon is known as one of the toughest players in the NHL, but he is an improving offensive player with good moves around the net. The native North American wears his hair very long like his Ojibwa ancestors. He overcame a drinking problem to make a career in hockey.

3027.   Swimmer, R., & Red Lake Peoples Council. (1988 July). excerpts of Press Conference, Minneapolis, July 12, 1988. Ojibwe News.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3028.   Swisher, B. F., Mrs. 1837-1894, [from old catalog] (Ed.). (1874-1976). The American Sketch Book La Crosse, Wis.: Sketch book company.
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 04023282

3029.   Sword, W. (1985). President Washington's Indian War: The Struggle for the Old Northwest, 1790-1795.  University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3030.   Szathmary, E., & Reed, T. E. (1972). Caucasian admixture in two Ojibwa Indian communities in Ontario. Human Biology, 44(4), 655-671.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIX (1975:71)
illus., maps, bibliogr.

3031.   Szathmary, E. J. (1984). Peopling of Northern North America: Clues From Genetic Studies. [Review] [113 Refs]. Acta Anthropogenetica, 8(1-2), 79-109.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The paper reviews the archaeological evidence for the length of human occupation in N. America and raises the question whether single or multiple movements of people out of Asia into America occurred, pointing out that considerable genetic variation can occur in small isolated populations in relatively short periods of time. The entire subarctic culture area is populated by speakers of either Athapascan or Algonkian language families. The archaeologic record for tracing the origin of these linguistic groups depends on items of material culture and these have been used to trace the origin of the modern peoples back for a few thousand years. Comparison between groups based on genetic data suffers from unevenness of the data for various Athapascan-and Algonkian-speaking groups. The problem is made more difficult by the smallness of populations and inadequate sample size. The gene diversity measure H of Nei has been used on data for the Athapaskan Dogrib. It suggests that there was probably significant gene diversity present in sub-arctic groups in pre-contact times. Probably this is true also for the Algonkians as typified by the Ojibwa. Examination of the apportioned gene diversity shows that the bulk of the diversity exists within groups rather than between groups. Genetic clues to the peopling of the Americas derive from specific marker genes and from genetic distance statistics. The distribution of the Dia and the GmZa; b03st alleles suggest that Athapaskan genetic links are towards the Bering Sea area while Algonkian connections are towards the south. Nei's genetic distance statistic was calculated for 13 populations using 14 blood group and enzyme loci. The dendrogram derived from the D matrix shows that Eskimos and Chukchi cluster together, and the Athapaskans are closer to the Eskimos than are the Algonkians. These relationships could be valid if the origin of Eskimos goes back to a population of Asiatic Beringia and that populations north of the late Wisconsin ice sheets included a group that led to the Athapaskans whilst populations south of the Wisconsin ice sheet led to the Algonkians.  (113 Refs)  (Abstract by: Author)

3032.   Szathmary, E. J., Cox, D. W., Gershowitz, H., Rucknagel, D. L., & Schanfield M. S. (1974). The Northern and Southeastern Ojibwa: Serum Proteins and Red Cell Enzyme Systems. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 40(1), 49-65.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

3033.   Szathmary, E. J., & Reed, T. E. (1972). Caucasian Admixture in Two Ojibwa Indian Communities in Ontario. Human Biology, 44(4), 655-671.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

3034.   Szathmary, E. J. E. (1977). Genetic studies on two Ontario Ojibwa Indian communities. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada).

3035.   Tanguay, C. (1836-1837). Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Candiennes. Montreal, Canada: Eusebe Senecal & Fils, imprimeurs.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
also on microfiche available from Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints Family History Centers; four volumes, written in French

3036.   Tanguay, J. (1998). La liberte d'errer et de vaquer: les Hurons de Lorette et l'occupation du territoire six-septieme-dix--neuvieme siecles. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universite Laval, Quebec.
Abstract: La presente etude questionne, une fois de plus, la nature des relations qui se sont developpees entre les puissances coloniales europeennes et les nations indiennes habitant la vallee du Saint-Laurent. En abordant plus precisement l'histoire des Hurons de Lorette et des rapports qu'ils ont entretenus depuis le XVII siecle avec leurs allies, nous chercherons a evaluer s'il existe le maintien d'un ordre politique et juridique amerindien, relativement independant de l'administration coloniale francaise et anglaise. Pour ce faire, nous traiterons de l'occupation territoriale des Indiens de Lorette en analysant les ententes intervenues avec d'autres nations sur le partage et la gestion commune du territoire. Il nous importe egalement de questionner la juridiction francaise et anglaise en ce qui concerne les droits de chasse et de peche des nations 'domiciliees'. Nous voulons ainsi apporter notre humble contribution a la problematique contemporaine des droits politiques, juridiques et territoriaux de la nation huronne-wendate.

3037.   Taniton, L., & Beaudry, N. (1992). Premier marchand de fourrures: récit dènè raconté par Louie Taniton. Recherches Amérindiennes Au Québec [Montreal], 22(2-3), 123-129.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search, English Summary

3038.   Tanner, H. H. (1996). The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780 to 1870 - Peers,Ll. Ethnohistory, 43(3), 548-550.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

3039.   Tanner, H. H. (1987). Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History.  University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3040.   Tanner, H. H. (1992). The Ojibwa. New York: Chelsea House Publishers.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3041.   Tanner, H. H. (1976). The Ojibwas: a critical bibliography. Bloomington//London: Indiana University Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXII (1979:12)
Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3042.   Tanner, J. Tanner's Narrative.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3043.   Tanner, J. (John Tanner's narrative). (1956). Evolution of human adaptations : readings in anthropology  (pp. 122-131). New York: Macmillan Pub. Co.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search, Reprinted from John Tanner's Narrative, J. Tanner, 1956

3044.   Tarapchak, S. J. Studies on the Xanthophyceae of the Red Lake Wetlands, Minnesota. Nova Hedwigia, 23(1).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

3045.   . (1976). H. M. TarbleThe story of my capture and escape  . New York : Garland Pub.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 1958351. Reprint of the 1904 ed. published by the Abbott Printing Co., St. Paul under title: The story of my capture and escape during the Minnesota Indian massacre of 1862. Issued with the reprint of the 1903 ed. of Parrish, J. The story of Captain Jasper Parrish. New York, 1976.

3046.   Taylor, D. H. (1991). Pretty Like A White Boy: The adventures of a blue-eyed Ojibway. This Magazine, 25(2), 29.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

3047.   Taylor, G. D. (1980). The New Deal and American Indian tribalism, the administration of the Indian Reorganization Act, 1934-5.  University of Nebraska Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3048.   Taylor, J. G. (1972). Northern Ojibwa communities of the contact-traditional period. Anthropologica, 14(1), 19-30.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVIII (1974:104)

3049.   Taylor, S. A. (1998). State Property Taxation of Tribal Fee Lands Located Within Reservation Boundaries. American Indian Law Review, 23(1), 55.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Reconsidering County of Yakima v. Confederated Tribes & Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation and Leech Lake Band of Chippewa Indians v. Cass County.

3050.   Teale, T. M. (1997). The liberty-genocide paradox: American Indians in European and American travel literature, 1795 to 1991 (France, William Least Heat Moon, Timothy Dwight, D.H. Lawrence, Alexis de Tocqueville, Jean Baudrillard, Simone de Beauvoir, James Fenimore Cooper). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook.
Abstract: The Liberty-Genocide Paradox examines a wide range of European travel accounts in order to understand how European travelers described or accounted for the interactions of American Indians and the general European-derived American population. I argue that most intellectual European travelers attempted to account for the liberty and freedom of one culture and the simultaneous destruction of another. European travelers noticed that United States juridical procedures protected private property while excluding Native Americans from the political and social life of the new American nation. While European intellectual travelers attempted some explanation, their Anglo-American counterparts ignored or glossed over the contradictions. Important to my argument is that after 1835 when the first part of Democracy in America was published, it was clear that Tocqueville provided travelers with a comprehensive  theory that explained the genocide-liberty paradox more comprehensively. Tocqueville capsulized the liberty-genocide paradox when he stated: 'It is impossible to destroy men with more respect to the laws of humanity.' Tocqueville arrived at this conclusion through research of the Congressional documents relating to the Indian Removal Act of 1830, research which he then amalgamated with travel observations. The model of comparative study Tocqueville gave us has largely been ignored especially by contemporary French traveler, Jean Baudrillard. Baudrillard claimed that though the foundations of American liberty are negative, we should not attempt to account for those negative foundations. In this dissertation, I demonstrate that an American writer, of Osage and Irish heritage, William Least Heat Moon revives and revitalizes Tocqueville's model of travel literature when he examines political, juridical, and social evidence to form a holistic picture of American life. The implications of this investigation into the interactions of American Indians and White people in tourist and travel relations go  far beyond travel literature itself. American writers used their travel accounts to develop and define American identity: Timothy Dwight, James Fenimore Cooper, and Timothy Flint provided exemplary texts as did the little known New Yorker, Benjamin Appel. With this selection of travel accounts, I reveal unique readings particularly of Dwight, Cooper, Tocqueville, D.H. Lawrence, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Baudrillard, and William Least Heat Moon. During the Tocqueville and Cooper timeline, I combine government-sponsored travel texts of a ethnographic and colonial turn by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft and Lewis Cass. For the Lawrence era, I weave in texts describing the social and political underpinnings of Taos tourism and art colony development. A further dimension of this study lies in its attention to Congressional documents and legislation which defined and circumscribed the life of Native tribes and nations who were observed by the travelers. A primary intention of this study is to inquire into the impact intellectual travelers have upon Native nations' people in specific geographic locations which show the relationship of people to the land. For this reason, attention has been given to the specific contact zone of  travel: The travelers selected observed American Indians at Saginaw, Michigan; Canandaigua, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the Cherokee and Choctaw nations in Georgia and Alabama; Taos pueblo, New Mexico; and Kaw City, Oklahoma.  Additionally, my project has a critical affiliation with Native American intellectuals committed to exploring questions raised by modern ethnic tourism. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

3051.   Tedlock, D., & Tedlock, B. (1975). Teachings from the American earth: Indian religion and philosophy. New York: Liveright.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

3052.   Teicher, M. I. (1962). "Windigo" psychosis among Algonkian-speaking Indians. International Journal of Parapsychology, 4(1), 5-53. 17 refs.
Notes: Source: Parapsychology Abstracts International, 1984:54
Abstract: Examines the tenacious belief held by the Algonkian-speaking Indians of Northeastern Canada in a superhuman, man-eating giant most commonly called windigo.  it is one of many spirits always present wandering in the forest.  Windigo inspires terror and people live in constant dread of him.  The windigo concept is a vital part of their belief system, providing a ready explanation for otherwise inexplicable happenings.  The outstanding symptom of windigo psychosis is the intense, compulsive desire to eat human flesh.  The individual who becomes a windigo is usually conviced that he has been possessed  by the spirit of the windigo monster.  One can also become transformed into a windigo or become so through the acquisition of a windigo spirit helper, through cannibalism caused by famine, and through sorcery.
  Describes the cultural and geographic settings in which the windigo belief flourished and in which cases of windigo psychosis were found.  He gives two cases of windogo psychosis out of 70 that he has studied.  He concludes: The underlying forces which converged on the individual to produce a breakdown in the living are ultimately not dissimilar from the biological, psychological, social and cultural forces which are found in humans all over the world.  But the conscious content of the illness, the symbols used, the delusional mold, the distortions of reality and the character of the compulsions are unmistakably dependent on the prevailing belief system and the traditional practices within the culture.  In a culture where the taboo on cannibalism was so powerful a focus, where the widigo belief was so widespread and important, the peculiar cannibalistic impulses clearly demonstrate this dependence of the morphology of mental illness upon the belief system.  As far as the windigo is concerned, it has been shown that belief controls behavior, even when the behavior iscontrary to social mores.  The belief is so strong as to control not only the behavior of those individuals regarded as cases of windigo psychosis but the behavior and perceptions of their fellows, as well.  Based on this, it appears that belief stands in respect to behavior as does cause to effect. -- DT/R.A.W.

3053.   . (1977). W. C. TempleIndian Villages of the Illinois Country: Historic Tribes .  Illinois State Museum Society.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

3054.   Temple, W. C. (1955). Moccasins from fish skins. Living Museum, XVII, 38.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3055.   Tenney, J. W. (1979). The NAIWoCCD [North American Indian Women's Council on Chemical Dependency] Alcoholism Research Project : a case study in the development of an ethnomethodology . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Roosevelt University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 5580821

3056.   Tepper, L. H. (1998). Legends of Our Times: Native Cowboy Life.  University of Washington Press.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

3057.   Thayer, B. W. (1942). The Algonquian trait of asymmetry in Ojibway art. Minnesota Archaeologist, VIII, 56-71, illus. XV-XXVII.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3058.   Thayer, B. W. (1942). "Black" as a preferred color in Ojibway art. Minnesota Archaeologist, VIII, 42-45.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3059.   Thayer, B. W. (1935). A comparison of Dakota and Ojibway steel implements with their prehistoric equivalents. Minnesota Archaeologist, 1(6), 1-6, illus.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3060.   Thayer, B. W. (1962). "Mong", the loon: symbolic bird of the Ojibwa. Minnesota Archaeologist, XXIV(3), 84-85, illus.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3061.   Thayer, B. W. (1935). Some Minnesota Ojibway games. Minnesota Archaeologist, 1(4), 1-4, illus.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3062.   Thayer, C. T., Mrs.  (1941). Indian legends of Minnesota. Minneapolis?
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25479720

3063.   Thayer, F., & Hilger, M. I. (1936). In the early days of Wisconsin; an amalgamation of Chippewa and European
cultures, [autobiography of Frank Thayer]. Wisconsin Archeologist, 16, 32-49.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3064.   The Century Co. (1952). New Century Dictionary of the English Language.  Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3065.   The Journal of American Indian family research. (1990). Report of Investigation of Claims of Pottawatomie Indians of Wisconsin, 1908. 1990, 11(1), 35.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

3066.   Thistle, J. L., Eckhart, K. L., Jr. , Nensel, R. E., Nobrega, F. T., Poehling, G. G., Reimer, M., & Schoenfield, L. J. (1971). Prevalence of Gallbladder Disease Among Chippewa Indians. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 46(9), 603-608.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

3067.   . (1984). J. R. ThomasCourage at Indian Deep  . New York : Clarion Books.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22996382 ... accession: 9761977
Abstract: For grade 6. Published in the Houghton Mifflin reading series in 1991. Forced to move to northern Minnesota from a comfortable life in Minneapolis, a family finds the need to make some big adjustments.

3068.   (1993).  [Recording]. Cambridge, MA : Yellow Moon Press.
Abstract: "Lakota stories"--Container liner. Introduction ; The pet donkey ; The spirit wife ; The rabbit people ; Iya (camp eater) -- Introduction ; Iktomi & buzzard ; Iktomi & ducks & rock ; Iktomi changes his mind

3069.   Thompson, A. E., 1900- . (1974). Chief Peguis and his descendants . Winnipeg: Peguis Publishers.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search)

3070.   Thompson, H. (1963). Cultural empathy. Indian Education, (No. 387).
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:56)

3071.   Thompson, H. (1966). Getting to know American Indians today. New York: Coward-McCann.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Includes detailed examples of modern Navajo life but other tribes (including Chippewa) are mentioned and prominent contemporary Indains are also described."

3072.   Thompson, J. R., & Harper I. H. (1974). The Low Incidence of Chronic Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in the Chippewa (Ojibwa) Indians of Minnesota. Minnesota Medicine, 57(12), 975-976.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

3073.   Thoms, J. M. (1996). Illegal conservation: two case studies of conflict between indigenous and state natural resource management paradigms. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Trent University (Canada).
Abstract: This thesis is about how government natural resource management  systems have come into contact and conflict with indigenous natural resource management systems. Two case studies have been developed with two indigenous communities who have experienced conflict with state management and have had their natural resource use criminalized by state conservation laws. One case study is historical and was conducted with the Red Rock Band, an Ojibway community located on the Nipigon River, in northwestern Ontario. The second case study is contemporary, and was conducted with Ban Mae Me Nai, a Karen community located in the Jae Sorn National Park, in northern Thailand. This thesis seeks to answer three questions about the nature of the conflict between government and indigenous natural resource management systems: (1) How are indigenous natural resource management systems criminalized? (i.e., how can the indigenous use of natural resources be framed as unlawful) (2) How do indigenous communities respond to having their resource use criminalized? (3) What has been the impact of the imposition of state conservation laws on indigenous cultures and economy? Four stages were observed in the criminalization of indigenous natural resource use: (1) the indigenous management system is invisible, (2) the indigenous use of the resources is portrayed as harmful, (3) the indigenous use is defined as illegal, (4) the indigenous community eventually becomes empowered to redress their rights to use and manage their natural resources in their own manner. The research found that indigenous communities have not been silent to the take-over of their resources and the criminalization of their resource use. It was found that the imposition of state natural resource management systems on indigenous communities has caused significant impacts upon their culture, economy, and environment.

3074.   Thorndale, W., & Dollarhide, W. (1987). Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Shows U.S. county boundary maps for the census decades superimposed on modern county boundaries. Gives background information on each census, including census availability for each county. Includes index. Bibliography: p. 399-410.

3075.   Thrasher, T., & McDowell, M. (1997). To Honor And Comfort: Native American Quilting Traditions. Native Peoples : the Journal of the Heard Museum, 10(4), 24.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Preview a spectacular expansive exhibit and definitive book that will debut this October at the NMAI/George Gustav Heye Center in New York. Tanya Thrasher (Cherokee), now of the National Congress of the American Indian, backgrounds this upcoming exhibit. Marsha McDowell of the Michigan State Museum is co-curator of the exhibit and primary author of the book To Honor and Comfort published by the Museum of New Mexico.n

3076.   Tibbles, T. H. (1972). The Ponca Chiefs: An Account of the Trial of Standing Bear.  University of Nebraska Press.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3077.   Todd, E. M. (1972). Ojibwa syllabic writing and its implications for a standard Ojibwa alphabet. Anthropological Linguistics, 14(9), 357-360.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVIII (1974:158)

3078.   Todd, E. M. (1971). A grammar of the Ojibwa language: the Severn dialect. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

3079.   Toland, J. (1976). Adolf Hitler.  Doubleday.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3080.   Tompkins, R. A. (1980). A cross-sectional study of height, weight and triceps skinfold measurements of Cherokee Indian Youths ages 13-17. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Tennessee.
Abstract: Anthropometric measurements of height, weight, and triceps skinfold were obtained from 266 Eastern Band Cherokee Indian youths ages 13-17. The data were compared to the United States national probability sample from the National Center for Health Statistics (HES), to a sample of American Indians from Minnesota, and to data on Whites from the Ten-State Nutrition Survey. The data were also examined for age, sex, and degree of Indian blood effects. Differences between the Cherokee and Blacks and Whites from the HES sample were tested by a Bonferroni Post Hoc examination of means. There were no significant differences for height, but differences were significant for 9 of 16 comparisons of weight and for all 16 comparisons of triceps skinfold means. Compared to the Minnesota Indian sample, the Cherokee are heavier and have thicker skinfold. Height values are essentially the same. The difference in skinfold values is greater between the males than between the females. The Cherokee economic status is reported as poor and examination of the effect of economic status on growth was undertaken by comparing the Cherokee data on Whites from the Ten-State Nutrition Survey. The Cherokee have higher values for triceps skinfold with the differences being greater for the males than for the females. The Cherokee males are taller, and the females are similar in height but heavier than their age and sex peers from the Ten-State Survey sample. An analysis of variance, using the General Linear Models Procedure was carried out to examine the effect of age, sex, and degree of Indian blood on growth. The females exceed the males in height, weight, and triceps skinfold values at age 13, but thereafter the males exceed the females in height and weight. The decrease in fatfold measurements for males after age 14 is concomitant with their growth spurt. The males show a greater trend toward a decrease in height with an increase in degree of Indian blood at age 13, and this trend and sex difference is most apparent at age 16. Also, at age 16, the sex difference decreases as the degree of Indian blood increases. The skewness values for height and triceps skinfold were not significant, but were for weight at ages 15 and 16 for the males and at ages 14-16 for the females. The relationship of weight to degree of Indian blood is significant. At ages 13 and 16, the sex difference is greater for those having between zero and one-fourth percent Indian blood. At ages 14-16 there is a decrease in sex differences as the degree of Indian blood increases. The Cherokee tend to be similar in height to Blacks, Whites, and Minnesota Indians. They are significantly heavier than their Black and White age and sex peers, and tend to be somewhat heavier than the Minnesota sample. The Cherokee difference in triceps skinfold is twofold. They have much greater fatfold values than their White, Black, and Minnesota peers, and they demonstrate considerably less sex differences in their fatfold measurements than their counterparts in the other three groups. There is a close relationship between obesity and maturity-onset diabetes, and, though heredity is a factor, the stress of obesity can be a precipitating factor to the onset. A high percent of adult Cherokee demonstrate maturity-onset diabetes with concomitant vascular complications, infections, and neuropathies. Findings from the data collected in this study suggest that obesity may be a greater problem for the Cherokee than for Blacks and Whites. Comparison of nutrient intake and activity level with other groups might help clarify obesity trends seen in this study.

3081.   Toombs, J. (1982). Chippewa Daughter.  Dell Publishing.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3082.   Topping, W. H. (1995). Paleo-Indian settlement patterns in eastern North America: a Michigan case study. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Wayne State University.
Abstract: The purpose of research conducted was to test four propositions for Paleo-Indian settlement. Settlement to procure caribou and settlement to procure or maintain access to chert are two prevailing propositions, and both imply strategic settlement. Initial fieldwork generated two more propositions for settlement: settlement to facilitate access to unknown territory, and settlement to facilitate food preparation. The results of testing include findings of no support for the prevailing propositions as logically constructed, but instead supported the two alternative propositions generated during initial research. Additionally, results of testing led to an interpretation of Eastern Paleo-Indian as a unified cultural expression primarily located at lower latitudes. The interpretation of the Paleo-Indian settlement pattern provided in the course of research favors ad hoc settlement at higher latitudes for the procurement of specific resources (caribou) within the context of a lower-latitude foraging system. The interpretation of the Paleo-Indian pattern as observed also favors an older chronology than conventionally proposed, and possibilities for radio-carbon dating errors are explored. Finally, a new model for hunter-gatherer transformation is generated during the course of explaining the Paleo-Indian pattern as observed: the utilization of luxurious resources. This model for transformation has wider applicability than Paleo-Indian studies alone.

3083.   Torangeau, R. N. (1991). Visual art as metaphor: understanding Anishinabe spirituality and Christianity (Native American art). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Graduate Theological Union.
Abstract: This dissertation seeks to demonstrate that an analysis of visual art as a tripartite symbolic phenomenon (affirmative, transformative and unitive) provides a framework within which the relationship between Christianity and indigenous religion can be better understood. It provides an analysis of significant paintings which have emerged from the hands of contemporary Anishinabe (Great Lakes Algonkian) artists during the past twenty-five years. The analysis approaches Anishinabe painting as a symbolic activity which can be seen to exhibit three distinctive characteristics: affirmative, transformative and unitive. Through the analysis, evidence is provided which reveals what may best be termed as the metaphorical nature of visual art. Simply stated, this term refers to that aspect of the art form which facilitates the linking together of apparently separate and distinct elements by some profoundly felt connection between them. This coming together of seemingly unlike elements yields something which is unique and does so without doing violence to the integrity of the original elements. It encourages the emergence of parts of their potentials which, until then, remains untapped. This approach to Anishinabe painting provides a framework within which the potential relationship between Christianity and Anishinabe religion can be better understood.

3084.   Torroni, A., Neel, J. V., Barrantes, R., Schurr, T. G., & Wallace D. C. (1994). Mitochondrial DNA Clock for the Amerinds and Its Implications for Timing Their Entry Into North-America. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 91(3), 1158-1162.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Students of the time of entry of the ancestors of the Amerinds into the New World are divided into two camps, one favoring an ''early'' entry [more than approximately 30,000 years before the present (YBP)], the other favoring a ''late'' entry (less than approximately 13,000 YBP). An ''intermediate'' date is unlikely for geological reasons. The correlation of the appropriate data on mtDNA variation in Amerinds with linguistic, archaeological, and genetic data offers the possibility of establishing a time frame for mtDNA evolution in Amerinds. In this paper, we estimate that the separation of the Chibcha-speaking tribes of Central America from other linguistic groups/nascent tribes began approximately 8000-10,000 YBP. Characterization of the mtDNA of 110 Chibcha speakers with 14 restriction enzymes leads on the basis of their time depth to an estimated mtDNA nucleotide substitution rate for Amerinds of 0.022-0.029% per 10,000 years. As a first application of this rate, we consider the mtDNA variation observed in 18 Amerind tribes widely dispersed throughout the Americas and studied by ourselves with the same techniques, and we estimate that if the Amerinds entered the New World as a single group, that entry occurred approximately 22,000-29,000 YBP. This estimate carries a large but indeterminate error. The mtDNA data are thus at present equivocal with respect to the most likely times of entry of the Amerind into the New World mentioned above but favor the ''early'' entry hypothesis. [References: 34]

3085.   Tower, J. (1989). Chippewa Spearfishing [television broadcast].
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

3086.   Townsend, W. [speech]. Lake Mohonk Conference, Proceedings .

3087.   Traditional and Current Status of Indian Women:  Keys to Analysis and Prevention of Wife Battering on Reserves (Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada).  School of  Social Work). (1988). Whipp, K.
Notes: Source: Child Abuse and Neglect database [University of Minnesota onlinedatabase], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: This paper explores the traditional status of Indian women with particular reference to wife beating.  General trends as well as several individual cultures, Iroquois, Haida, Ojibwa, and Micmac, are examined.  A response to 3 recent studies on the problem is presented.  The rationale for focusing on "status of women" as the primary cause of wife abuse is discussed. Suggestions for further study and possible preventative strategies also are highlighted, and a bibliography is included.

3088.   Trainor, J. F. (1994). Corona blue : an Angela Biwaban mystery . New York, N.Y.  Kensington Books.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-31367761
Abstract: Angela Biwaban, the Anishinabe princess from Duluth, recently released from prison finds a corpse in a pinstripe suit face-down in the cornfield. Angie takes on a dozen names and faces to infiltrate a ruthless conglomerate and run a daring scam on a banker eager to make a killing on Elderkin land

3089.   . (1989). M. Traynor (Ombudsman for Corrections), A Report on American Indian juveniles in the criminal justice system . Saint Paul, Minn.  Ombudsman for Corrections.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21269708. Caption title. "March 1989." "Data assembled by Mark Traynor." Includes bibliographical references. ... accession: 19639463

3090.   Treat, J., 1775-1853. (1815). The vindication of Captain Joseph Treat, late of Twenty-first Regiment United States Infantry, against the atrocious calumny comprehended in Major General Brown's official report of the Battle of Chippeway. Philadelphia.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search).  "Proceedings of a general court martial, held at Sackett's Harbor, in the state of New York", April 5 to May 8, 1815, for the trial of Treat on a charge of cowardice at the battle of Chippewa: p. [17]-56. Caption title: To James Madison, president of the United States.

3091.   Tregillis, H. C. (1997). The Indians of Illinois.  Heritage Books, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

3092.   Treuer, A. (1997). Inanimate Transitive Verbs in Minnesota Ojibwe. Oshkaabewis Native Journal, 4(2), 61.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

3093.   Treuer, A. (1998). Ojibwe. Minnesota History, 56(4), 172.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

3094.   Treuer, A. (1998). Traditional Anishinaabe Learning: Melvin Eagle and the Art of Gikendaasowin.  Oshkaabewis Native Journal, 5(1), 3.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

3095.   Treuer, A. S. (1998). The assassination of Hole in the Day (Ojibwe, Chippewa, leadership). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: The nature of Ojibwe (Chippewa) leadership was transformed in the nineteenth century from an ancient patrilineal clan based paradigm to a new, more fluid pattern which put greater emphasis on diplomatic relations with the Dakota and American governments as well as powers of oratory, military leadership and intratribal politics. The most dramatic changes to Ojibwe leadership paradigms occurred during the life of Ojibwe chief Hole in the Day II (Bagone-giizhig) of central Minnesota. Hole in the Day himself was more than a witness to those changes. He was an active agent in the transformation of Ojibwe leadership. This thesis uses Hole in the Day's amazing life and dramatic, mysterious death to delve into the nature of Ojibwe leadership in the nineteenth century and its metamorphosis. This thesis combines a range of sources, including much new research. The author has included a great deal of source material from Ojibwe oral history and linguistic analysis to access Ojibwe thought patterns about their own leadership dynamics. The result is a not only new evidence, but a new approach to Ojibwe history and the complicated arena of American Indian diplomacy.

3096.   Tripp, W. (1998). Red coats and grey jackets: The battle of Chippewa, 5 July 1814. NEW YORK HIST , 79(3), 317-318.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

3097.   Trodden, B. J. (1994). An epidemiological comparison of rural vs. urban, and native vs. non-native, dental health in Manitoba children aged six and thirteen years (six-year-old, thirteen-year-old). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Manitoba (Canada).
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to compare the dental health status of two groups of Manitoba Native children, six and thirteen years of age, to studies of Manitoba White children of similar ages, and to determine whether any differences found are due to the often isolated rural environment in which they commonly live. The populations included in this study consist of both Native and White children living in rural communities in Manitoba, and a sample of White children living in an urban environment. The first part of the study is a dental survey of the children belonging to the Swampy Cree Tribe and living on six reserves close to The Pas, in northwest Manitoba. The second part of the study looks at the Native children in central and northeastern Manitoba, primarily Ojibwa, who were treated by the Manitoba Children's Dental Program. Most studies of Canadian Native children have shown very poor overall oral health, with a dental caries rate three to four times higher than the general population. This study attempts to determine whether this problem of rampant decay is primarily the result of limited access to dental care found in the rural environment. The results of this study indicate that: first, in most measures of dental health status, there is a significant difference in the quality of dental health of Manitoba children at six and thirteen years of age, that follows a rural-urban, as well as an Native-White distribution. Second, there is a clear urban-rural dichotomy in the extent to which the treatment needs of Manitoba children are being met. The rural White children are only slightly better off than the rural Native children, and both are significantly worse off than are urban White children. There is more of a difference in the 6-year-olds between the urban and rural White children than there is for 13-year-olds. These results are consistent with the results of previous studies in which Native and rural children had significantly greater caries rates and fewer of their treatment needs were met, especially for younger children, 5-6 years of age. The implications of this research are that perhaps this is the appropriate framework within which to evaluate the delivery of dental health care, and perhaps health care in general, at least within Canada, a country in which the rural population is, for the most part, far more removed from the urban centres than is true of virtually any other country. Most of us presume that the general health status of Canadian Indians and Inuit is well below that of the predominantly White population, and that this is part of the overall pattern of neglect that has been accorded historically to Indian and Inuit people. What may not be so clear is the extent to which simple remoteness from urban centres of treatment may be an equally important variable. Certainly, there is evident need to improve the standards of health care for Canada's Native peoples, but this need should be assessed within the broader context of an urban-rural framework, rather than as simply one of ethnic neglect.

3098.   Trottier, W. J. (1997). Perceived leadership styles of American Indian and non-Indian administrators in reservation schools. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of North Dakota.
Abstract: This study examined the perceived leadership styles of American Indian and non-Indian school administrators in reservation-based  schools. The Leader Effectiveness & Adaptability Description - Self (LEAD - Self) was used to obtain the self-perceived leadership styles, ranges, and adaptabilities of 40 American Indian and 92 non-Indian school administrators in the Northern Plains states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Montana. Additionally, each administrator was required to respond to four demographic questions. These data were used to help develop a  typical leadership profile of these administrators. The results of the study suggest that a majority of both the American Indian administrators (53%) and the non-Indian administrators (60%) perceived themselves as having a primary leadership style of selling. The remaining American Indian administrators (36%) and the non-Indian administrators (33%) perceived themselves as having a secondary leadership style of participating. Both American Indian administrators (95%) and non-Indian administrators (92%) perceived themselves as having moderate levels of flexibility or range of leadership styles. Also, both American Indian administrators (75%) and non-Indian administrators (66%) perceived themselves as having moderate levels of leadership style adaptability or appropriate application of leadership styles. The leadership styles, ranges, and adaptabilities of American Indian and non-Indian administrators in reservation schools did not differ significantly from each other. In fact, the only significant difference found between the two groups was that non-Indian administrators had more teaching experience. The investigator concluded that the American Indian and non-Indian administrators in reservation schools were essentially alike in their leadership behaviors as indicated by the LEAD - Self data. A variety of reasons were posited for this conclusion, including the potential acculturation of  American Indian administrators as a result of their educational experiences and the use of similar leadership behavior because of its effectiveness. Based on the findings of this study, recommendations were made to conduct further research about the leadership of American Indians in school settings. Additionally, it was recommended that further studies be conducted that focused on the staff perceptions of leadership in the schools.

3099.   Turcheneske, J. A., Jr. (1993). Wisconsin's attempt to reach a treaty rights settlement with its Chippewa Indians. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 24, 381-401.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3100.   Turcheneske, J. A., Jr. (1993). Wisconsin's attempt to reach a treaty rights settlement with its Chippewa Indians. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 24, 381-401.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

3101.   Turnbull, A. M. J. (1998). Indicating alliance: kinship terms in discourse among the Ojibwe and Potawatomi of southwestern Ontario. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada).
Abstract: Anthropologists' enthusiasm for kinship analysis has abated since many of the universals produced through structuralism have been challenged. Kinship, however, continues to be a significant factor in how many people think about the world around them. This thesis analyses ethnographic data from work done with the Ojibwe and Potawatomi of southwestern Ontario to address the meaning of kinship terms used in jokes, in everyday conversations, and in political discourse. With an emphasis on the dynamic and contested meanings of relatedness, kinship terms are seen to express culturally significant understandings of alliance in particular relationships. As kinship relations signify placement in the social world, and land is central to Ojibwe and Potawatomi identity, the concepts of kinship and affiliation with a land base are intertwined. This thesis educes the significance and meaning of the use of kinship terms from an analysis of details of particular interactions, and then applies these findings to the analysis of discourse in archival materials.

3102.   Turner, F. J. (1891). Character & Influence of the Indian Trade in Wisconsin: A Study of the Trading Post As an Institution.  Burt Franklin Publisher.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3103.   Turner, F. J. (1977). The Character & Influence of the Indian Trade in Wisconsin: A Study of the Trading Post As an Institution.  University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

3104.   Turner, F. J. (1980). The character and influence of the Indian trade in Wisconsin. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The John Hopkins University.

3105.   Turner, G. (1962). Dunning, R.W.  Social and economic change among the northern Ojibwa.  [Book Review]. Man, 62.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. VIII (1963:104)

3106.   Turner, V. W. (1974). Dramas, fields and metaphors: symbolic action in human society. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

3107.   Turton, C. L. R. (1995). Spiritual Needs of Hospitalized Ojibwe People. Michigan Nurse, 68(5), 11-12.
Notes: Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search. (6 Ref)

3108.   Turton, C. L. R. (1997). Ways of Knowing About Health: an Aboriginal Perspective. ANS - Advances in Nursing Science., 19(3), 28-36.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search.  (36 Ref)
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [full text available]
Abstract: Because of the questionable applicability to extant health promotion models and middle-range theories to aboriginal peoples, foundational inquiries examining the nature of cultural beliefs and ways of knowing about health within the cultures of various ethnic groups are imperative. This article describes the ways of knowing about health reported by Ojibwe people during an ethnographic inquiry in the Great Lakes region. These ways included stories from the oral tradition, authoritative knowledge of elders, 'commonsense' models of illness and health, spiritual knowledge, and knowing oneself. The health-world view, a conceptual orientation for investigating health beliefs, is offered.  (Abstract by: Author)
Abstract: The Ojibwe people of the Great Lakes region have preserved unique methods of health assessment which can apply to middle-range nursing theory. These methods include traditional stories, knowledge from tribal elders, models of health and illness based on common experience, spiritual knowledge, and self-knowledge. Nursing shares a core concern of health promotion with this Native American population

3109.   Twining, H. H., 1900-1971. (1927). Herbert H. Twining papers.
Abstract: Donor: 6438 Photographs described in Visual Materials File. Correspondence, articles, speeches and photographs; also Camp Al-Gon-Quian materials, including program files, reports, roster files, and published yearly programs; materials of King family, missionaries in China; and plans of Twining home in Ann Arbor, Michigan, originally designed by Albert Kahn and his associate Malcolm for Louis A. Strauss. Pioneer in the private camping movement, founder and director of Al-Gon-Quian Boys Camp on Burt Lake in Cheboygan County, Michigan, and officer in the American Camping Association.

3110.   . (1998). E. D. Two-Rivers, 1945- Survivor's medicine : short stories  . Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: "Oh Wah! Such a Shinob!" -- Jason high-flying -- Harold Ball -- The horse barn and little Lady Jane -- Identity crisis -- Joe Walks-Bear comes home -- Same Ole, same ole: the industrial education of a redskinned machinist -- Treachery in the ghetto -- Slow Walker: hero of the mud flat battles -- Cone trees and big deals -- Numb-nuts and the cheese-head hat -- Bill and Glenda -- Benny Red- Beaver -- Nomad -- On the run -- Smoking pistol syndrome -- Rin Tin Tin of the Yukon, or at least Highway 80 -- Russell's freedom -- Sawdust Bannock -- Sojourner -- Spirit sticks -- Ninety percent bullshit, ten percent skill.

3111.   Two Rivers Native Film and Video Festival (1991 : Minneapolis, Minn.). (1991). Minneapolis American Indian Center hosts Two Rivers Native Film and Video Festival, Oct. 9-13, 1991 : program guide. Minneapolis, Minn.  Minneapolis American Indian Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25493962. Title from cover.

3112.   Tyler, L. (1973). A History of Indian Policy.  U.S. Department of the Interior.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3113.   U.S. Office of Indian Affairs. (Chippewa Annuity Rolls, 1841-1907. Microfilm Series M-390. microfilm.  Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3114.   Ujke, D. M. (1993). Tribal Court Jurisdiction in Domestic Relations Matters Involving Indian Children: Not Just a Matter of Comity. Wisconsin Lawyer : Official Publication of the ..., 66(8), 10.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: It is important for family law practitioners to understand statutory and case law governing tribal court jurisdiction, particularly in child welfare matters where such jurisdiction may be exclusive.

3115.   Underhill, R. M. (1961). Antelope Singer. New York: Coward-McCann, Incorporated.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "The story of a family's adventures as they travel to California by covered wagon, and their friendship with the Paiute Indian Tribe.  Grades 3-7."

3116.   Unger, M. J. (1998). The role of landscape architects in park management, planning and design with regard to indigenous peoples (Ontario, New Zealand). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Guelph (Canada).
Abstract: When European colonization occurred in Canada and New Zealand, pressure for indigenous people to assimilate into an alternative lifestyle was initiated. Imposed upon indigenous populations were European views of land use. The purpose of this study is to investigate how indigenous people participate in management, planning and design of parks, and if the current process is successful. It is no longer acceptable for a landscape architect to design from a mono-cultural perspective. An overview of Ojibwe (Ontario) and Maori (New Zealand) cultures have been written to show the differences between European perspectives of lifestyle and land management. Two case studies show an existing need to improve the relationship between government and indigenous peoples. There is also a need to improve the methods of acquiring participation of indigenous people in resource management. Landscape architects are in a position to learn what indigenous needs and expressions are in order to implement them and work with resource management systems.

3117.   Unger, R. W. (1968). Lewis Cass: Indian superintendent of the Michigan Territory, 1813-1831.  A survey of public opinion as reported by the newspapers of the Old Northwest Territory. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Ball State University.

3118.   United Church Committee on Indian Work (Minn.). (1957). Plan of operation and progress report based on a general survey of the United Church Committee on Indian Work and the situation facing American Indian people in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, 1957. [St. Paul?, Minn.] : United Church Committee on Indian Work .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6546828. Caption title.

3119.   United States. (1829). By the President of the United States of America to all and singular to whom these presents shall come, greeting: Whereas, a treaty between the United States of America and the Chippeway, Menomonie and Winnebago tribes of Indians, was made and concluded on the eleventh day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven, at the Butte des Morts, on Fox River, in the Territory of Michigan, between Lewis Cass and Thomas L. M'Kenney, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and certain chiefs and warriors of the said tribes on the part of the said tribes ... Washington.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search).  Cass, Lewis, 1782-1866; McKenney, Thomas Loraine, 1785-1859.  Ratified by the Senate Feb. 19, 1829; signed by the President Feb. 23, 1829. Sabin 96652. Consists of 2 attached sheets; 1st sheet printed on both sides, 2d sheet blank.

3120.   United States. (1922). No. 24 original : in the Supreme Court of the United States, October term, 1922 : United States of America, plaintiff, vs. the State of Minnesota : answer to bill of complaint . Washington? D.C.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Title from cover.  Other: Hilton, Clifford L., 1866-1946. Brown, Montreville J., 1884-1971. Pierce, C. R. (Charles R.). Minnesota.

3121.   . (1983). United StatesPublic Law 98-123. 97 Stat. 815. Oct. 13, 1983, (S. 884).  An Act to Provide for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in Docket Numbered 15-72 of the United States Court of Claims . Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O. : Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., distributor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 10319778.  Caption title. "Public Law 98-123." "97 Stat. 815." "Oct. 13, 1983, (S. 884)"

3122.   United States. Statutes, 18 U.S.C. §1151, Indian Country defined.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3123.   United States. (1864). Supplementary treaty between the United States of America and the Red Lake and Pembina Bands of Chippewas : concluded April 12, 1864 ; ratification advised by Senate April 21, 1864 ; proclaimed April 25, 1864. Washington, D.C.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21420271.  Half title. Caption title: Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, to all and singular to whom these presents shall come, greeting. Concluded at "the city of Washington in the District of Columbia." Supplementary to treaty concluded October 2, 1863. No. 165 in a 3 v. collection of Indian treaties made between the years 1824-1868. Binder's title: Treaties between the United States and the Indians.
Alt Title: Treaties, etc. 1864 Apr. 12 Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, to all and singular to whom these presents shall come, greeting. Treaties between the United States and the Indians.
Other: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln) Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians. Treaties, etc. United States, 1864 Apr. 12. Pembina Band of Chippewa Indians. Treaties, etc. United States, 1864 Apr. 12.

3124.   United States. (1860). U.S. Census.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3125.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. (1964-1977). Flood plain information. [Detroit?].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23718991, accession: 23718991.  Michigan. Water Resources Commission. Special flood hazard information report.
Abstract: Prepared for the Water Resources Commission, Michigan Department of Natural Resources and others by various districts of the Army Corps of Engineers. Vols. for 197- have title: Special flood hazard information report. [1] Clinton River, Michigan; main river and main branch in Macomb County.--[2] Red Cedar River, Ingham County, Michigan.- -[3] Grand River, Ingham County, Eaton County, Michigan.--[4] Lookingglass River, Clinton County, Michigan.--[5] Grand River, Red Cedar River and Sycamore Creek, Lansing, Michigan and vicinity.--[6] Lower River Rouge, Wayne, Michigan, and vicinity.--[7] Ontonagon River, Ontonagon, Michigan, and Lake Superior shoreline, Ontonagon County, Michigan.--[8] Grand River, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and vicinity.--[9] Upper River Rouge, Minnow Pond Drain, Bell Branch and Tarabusi Creek, Wayne and Oakland counties, Michigan.--[10] Clinton River and Paint Creek, Oakland County, Michigan.--[11] Grand and Thornapple rivers, Ada Township, Kent County, Mich.--[12] Grand River, Ottawa County, Mich.--[13] Grand River, Ionia, Mich.--[14] Huron River, Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti, Michigan and vicinity.

3126.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. (1980). Reconnaissance report : Red River of the North Basin, Devils Lake subbasin . Baton Rouge, La.  Gulf South Research Institute.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 12786041.  "Final report, December 1980." Cover title: Red River of the North, reconnaissance report. Bibliography: leaves 75-80. Prepared for: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, St. Paul, Minnesota.  Other: Gulf South Research Institute. United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District. Red River of the North, reconnaissance report. Reconnaissance report, Red River of the North Basin, Devils Lake subbasin.

3127.   . (1919). United States. Army. Corps of EngineersRed Lake and Red Lake River, Minn. : letter from the Secretary of War, transmitting with the letter from the Chief of Engineers, reports on preliminary examination and survey of Red Lake, Minn., and Red Lake River from its outlet at Red Lake to its junction with the Red River of the North . Washington.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession:: 30909521

3128.   Western Minnesota showing water-sheds of Red Lake and upper Red River. (1892). St. Paul : U.S. Engineer Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search). From: U.S. 52d Cong., 1st sess., 1891-1892. House ex. doc. -- no. 127, opp. p. 22. -- (Serial set ; 2954). Relief shown by hachures.

3129.   . (1964). United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul DistrictFlood control and water conservation, Red Lake River, Minnesota, Red River of the North watershed, Red Lake Dam and Red Lakes Reservoir and Red Lake River and Clearwater River-channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual  . St. Paul, Minn.  Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24222276.  Alt Title: Red Lake River, Minnesota, Red River of the North watershed, Red Lake Dam and Red Lakes Reservoir and Red Lake River and Clearwater River-channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual Red River of the North watershed, Red Lake Dam and Red Lakes Reservoir and Red Lake River and Clearwater River-channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual Red Lake Dam and Red Lakes Reservoir and Red Lake River and Clearwater River-channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual Red Lake River and Clearwater River-channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual Flood control and water conservation, Red Lake River, Minnesota, Red River of the North watershed, Red Lake Dam and Red Lakes Reservoir, reservoir regulation manual

3130.   . (1963). United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul DistrictFlood control and water conservation, Red River of the North watershed, Lake Traverse-Bois de Sioux River, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Lake Traverse Reservoir, reservoir regulation manual  . St. Paul, Minn.  Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24618669.  Alt Title: Red River of the North watershed, Lake Traverse-Bois de Sioux River, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Lake Traverse Reservoir, reservoir regulation manual Lake Traverse-Bois de Sioux River, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Lake Traverse Reservoir, reservoir regulation manual Lake Traverse Reservoir, reservoir regulation manual Lake Traverse Reservoir Flood control and water conservation, Red River of the North watershed, Lake Traverse Reservoir and Bois de Sioux River- channel improvement, reservoir regulation manual.

3131.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District. (1984). General reevaluation for flood control and related purposes Red and Red Lake Rivers at East Grand Forks, Minnesota. St. Paul, Minn.  Dept. of Army, St. Paul District Corps of Engineers.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13169052

3132.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District. (1984). General reevaluation for flood control and related purposes, Red and Red Lake rivers at East Grand Forks, Minnesota : draft main report and environmental impact statement. St. Paul, Minnesota : Dept. of the Army, St. Paul District Corps of Engineers.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19640284
Abstract: 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 29 cm. + appendix (1 v. (various pagings) : ill. (some fold.) ; 28 cm.)
 NOTES: Title on appendix: General reevaluation supporting documentation for flood control and related purposes : draft supporting documentation. "September 1984"--t.p. Includes bibliographies.

3133.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District. (1998). General reevaluation report and environmental impact statement : East Grand Forks, Minnesota and Grand Forks, North Dakota : local flood reduction project, Red River of the North [East Grand Forks, Minnesota and Grand Forks, North Dakota Local flood reduction project, Red River of the North].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Cover title. "November 1998." Project authority comes from resuming the Planning, Engineering, and Design authority for East Grand Forks, suspended in 1987. Includes bibliographical references and index (p. EIS 109- 112). [Main report] ; Environmental impact statement ; Report, plates, drawings -- Supplementary documentation. Appendices A- C. v. 1. H&H appendices ; Geotechnical appendices ; Economics - social - financial appendices -- Supplmenetary documentation. Appendices D-L. v. 2. Cost engineering appendix ; Environmental appendices ; Real estate supplement/appendix ; Recreation and aesthetics plan appendix ; Mechanical, electric, architectural appendix ; Structural design appendix ; Supplementary report on split-flow diversion ; Preliminary Project management plan report ; Correspondence and review comments.

3134.   . (1996). United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul DistrictRed Lake and Clearwater Rivers Project, Red Lake River, Red Lake Dam on the Red Lake River, Clearwater County near the City of Red Lake, Minnesota periodic inspection and continuing evaluation of completed civil works structures  . St. Paul, Minn.  U. S. Army. Corps of Engineers.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Title from cover.  Other: Red Lake and Clearwater Rivers Project.  Alternate title: Red Lake Dam on the Red Lake River, Clearwater County near the City of Red Lake, Minnesota periodic inspection and continuing evaluation of completed civil works structures Red Lake Dam Periodic inspection and continuing evaluation of completed civil works structures Red Lake River Project, Red Lake River, Minnesota, Red Lake Dam

3135.   . (1978). United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District.Red Lake River Dam, MN 502, Red Lake River, Pennington County, Minnesota  . St. Paul : United States. Army. Corps of Engineers for State of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ... accession: 18611295

3136.   United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. St. Paul District, & Gulf South Research Institute. (1980). Reconnaissance report : Red River of the North Basin, Red Lake River subbasin . Baton Rouge, La.  Gulf South Research Institute.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Cover title. "Final report, December 1980."  Alt. title: Red River of the North : reconnaissance report
Abstract: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 92-99) Prepared for: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, St. Paul, Minnesota.

3137.   . (1943). United States. Army. Office of the Chief of EngineersRed Lake River and tributaries, including Clearwater River, Minn. : letter from the Secretary of War transmitting a letter from the Chief of Engineers, United States Army ....  Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27644954. "Referred to the Committee on Flood Control." "October 28, 1943."

3138.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1983). 1983 Annuity Payment Roll. Redlake, MN: Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3139.   United States.  Bureau of  Indian Affairs. (1934).
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3140.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1936). [Constitution and by-laws of Indian tribes of North America] . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24658135
Abstract: Title supplied by cataloger. [v. 1-2] Alaska -- [v. 3] Arizona, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, South Carolina, Kansas, Nebraska -- [v. 4] Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota -- [v. 5] California, Nevada, Utah -- [v. 6] Washington, Idaho, Montana -- [v. 7] North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Iowa.

3141.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1936). [Corporate charter of Indian tribes of North America]  . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24658654
Abstract: [v. 1.] Alaska -- [v. 2.] California, Nevada, Utah --[v. 3.] Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota -- [v. 4.] Florida, Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Kansas, Nebraska -- [v. 5.] Wisconsin, Michigan, Oklahoma, Minnesota.

3142.   Highway system [atlas] : Red Lake Indian Agency, Minnesota . (1990). (Rev. p. 1979- ). [Washington, D.C.] : United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31103443
Abstract: "Three volume atlas prepared and distributed by the Division of Transportation, with periodically updated map pages prepared by the Branch of Roads of each Area Office"--The Division. Relief shown by hachures. Maps show roads, reservoirs, rivers, lakes in, and boundaries of, Indian reservations. Updated map pages each have title: Highway system map. Shipping list no.: 90-585-P. Maps printed 1990. sheets 1-9. Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota.

3143.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1886). Indian census rolls, 1885-1940. La Pointe. Washington, D.C.  Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26137415
Abstract: roll 242. Bad River and Red Cliff Chippewa Indians, 1923-27. Roll 234. Bad River, Bois Fort, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreille, Lac du Flambeau and Red Cliff Chippewa Indians, 1886-89 -- roll 235. Bad River, Bois Fort or Vermillion Lake, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau and Red Cliff Chippewa Indians, 1890-92 -- roll 236. Bad River, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Red Cliff and Vermillion Lake Chippewa Indians, 1893-1894 -- roll 237. Bad River, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Red Cliff and Vermillion Lake Chippewa Indians, 1895-97 -- roll 238. Bad River, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Red Cliff, Rice Lake and Vermillion Lake Chippewa Indians, 1898-1902 -- roll 239. Bad River, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Red Cliff, Rice Lake and Vermillion Lake Chippewa Indians, 1903-07 -- roll 240. Bad River, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, Red Cliff and Rice Lake Chippewa Indians, 1908-15 -- roll 241. Bad River Chippewa Indians, 1916-22 -- Microfilm. Washington, D.C. : National Archives, 1965. 9 microfilm reels ; 35 mm. (National Archives microfilm publictions ; microcopy no. 595, reel 234-242)

3144.   . (1907). United States. Bureau of Indian AffairsIndian census rolls, 1885-1940. Red Lake (Red Lake and Pembina Chippewa Indians) . Washington, D.C.  National Archives and Records Administration.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ... accession: 26142856
Abstract: "For earlier rolls see Leech Lake and White Earth." "See also Consolidated Chippewa, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, and Nett Lake." Roll 418. Red Lake and Pembina Chippewa Indians, 1907-12 -- Roll 419. Red Lake and Pembina Chippewa Indians, 1913-17, 1919 -- Roll 420. Red Lake and Pembina, Fond du Lac, Grand Portage, Bois Fort, Vermillion Lake, and Deer Creek Chippewa Indians, 1920-23 -- Roll 421. Chippewa Indians, 1924-29 -- Roll 422. Chippewa Indians, 1930-32 -- Roll 423. Chippewa Indians, 1933-35 -- Roll 424. Chippewa Indians, 1936-39. Microfilm. Washington, D.C. : National Archives, 1965. 7 microfilm reels ; 35 mm. (National Archives microfilm publications ; microcopy no. 595, reels 418-424)

3145.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Law and Order Provisions [for Red Lake Indian Reservation]. Red Lake Indian Reservation.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995), mimeographed

3146.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1987). Public hearing comments on BIA agricultural programs ; In the matter of public hearing re September 1986 report to Congress on agriculture, B.I.A. agriculture range programs ; Public hearing on Public Law 99-190 at Chinle Chapter House ; In the matter of a public hearing regarding Indian agriculture ; [Hearing] before the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the State of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21631866. Transcripts of hearings before representatives of the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs on Public Law 99-190.

3147.   United States.  Bureau of Indian Affairs. (Red Lake Indian Enrollments, 1885-1938. BIA Indian Enrollments, 1885-1938, Record Group 75, Microfilm series M-595. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3148.   . (1860). United States. Bureau of Indian AffairsReport of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, submitting in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, an estimate of the amounts that will be required to hold councils with certain Indians of the plains and in the state of Minnesota . Washington, D.C.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 9796759. Caption title. "April 13, 1860, referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs. April 16, 1860, ordered to be printed."  Other: United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs. An estimate of the amounts that will be required to hold councils with certain Indians of the plains and in the state of Minnesota.

3149.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs, & Aguar, J. &. W. (1964). Tourist and recreational resources, Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota . Duluth, Minn.  Aguar, Jyring & Whiteman.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 11556157
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: One folded sheet of maps in pocket. Includes bibliography.

3150.   . (1975). United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Division of Law EnforcementIndian law enforcement history . Washington : Bureau of Indian Affairs, Division of Law Enforcement Services.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30886370.  Includes bibliographical references.

3151.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Minneapolis Area. (1987). Grand Portage forest resources management plan : and environmental assessment. Minneapolis, Minn.  United States Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Minneapolis Area Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26443981. Title from cover. Includes bibliographies.

3152.   Highway system map, Red Lake Indian Agency, Minnesota [Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota]. (1979). [Minneapolis, Minn.] : Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23046889.  Alternate title: Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota. Insets on sheet 8 [1:15,840]: Red Lake -- Redby village streets -- Ponemah village streets. Designed to fit looseleaf binder. Binder holes in left margin. "U.S. Government Printing Office: 1990 775- 383."

3153.   United States.  Bureau of Indian Affairs.  Minneapolis Area Office. (1945 July). [Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs, attention Joe Jennings].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3154.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Minneapolis Area Office. (1971). Informational pamphlet : Minnesota, Great Lakes, Sac and Fox, Red Lake : Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Iowa  . Minneapolis, Minn.  Bureau of Indian Affairs. Minneapolis Area Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

3155.   United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Minneapolis Area Office. (1969). Preliminary report, economic background and resources, Red Lake Indian Reservation : Beltrami and Clearwater Counties, State of Minnesota. Minneapolis : Bureau of Indian Affairs.  Minneapolis Area Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Cover title. On cover: Lloyd W. Ogden, Area Supervisory Appraiser. Bibliography: leaves 41-43.  Other: Economic background the resources, Red Lake Indian Reservation.

3156.   (1963). Bemidji, MN:
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:98), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Leaflet telling the historical background of Minnesota's Indians and factual information on the present reservations of Minnesota."

3157.   . (1975). United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Planning Support GroupStatistical data for planning : [Indian reservations, Minneapolis Area  . Billings, Mont.  Planning Support Group.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Includes bibliographies. [1] Sac and Fox Settlement.--[2] Bay Mills and Sugar Island Reservation.--[3] Hannahville Reservation.--[4] Isabella Reservation.--[5] L'Anse Reservation.--[6] Fond du Lac Reservation.--[7] Grand Portage Reservation.--[8] Leech Lake Reservation.--[9] Lower Sioux Reservation.--[10] Mille Lacs Reservation.--[11] Nett Lake Reservation.--[12] Prairie Island Reservation.--[13] Prior Lake Reservation.--[14] Red Lake Reservation.--[15] Upper Sioux Reservation.--[16] Vermillion Reservation.--[17] White Earth Reservation.--[18] Badriver Reservation.--[19] Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation.-- [20] Lac du Flambeau Reservation.--[21] Mole Lake and Potawatomi Reservation.--[22] Oneida Reservation.--[23] Red Cliff Reservation.--[24] Stockbridge Munsee Reservation.-- [25] Winnebago Reservation.--[26] St. Croix Reservation.-- [27] Menominee Reservation

3158.   . (1975). United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Planning Support GroupStatistical data for planning : Red Lake Reservation  . Billings, Mont.  United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Chiefly tables. Bibliography: p. 70-71.

3159.   . (1979). United States.  Bureau of Indian Affairs. The Planning and Support Group [Billings, Montana]Red Lake Indian Reservation, its resources and development potential Vol. Report No. 253). Billings, Mont.  Bureau of Indian Affairs. Planning Support Group.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

3160.   United States. Bureau of the Census. General housing characteristics. Census '90. (1992). 1990 Census of housing. General housing characteristics. [Washington, D.C.] : U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26942111.  Alt Title: Census of housing (1990). General housing characteristics.
Abstract: "Census '90"--Cover. "Issued July 1992." 1990 CH-1-<1-55>; CH-1-45 and 1-54 not assigned. 1-1.  United States -- 1-1A. American Indian and Alaskas native areas -- 1-1B. Metropolitan areas (3 v.) -- 1-1C. Urbanized areas (3 v.) -- 1-2. Alabama -- 1-3. Alaska -- 1-4. Arizona -- 1-5. Arkansas -- 1-6. California (2 v.) -- 1-7. Colorado -- 1-8. Connecticut -- 1-9. Delaware -- 1-10. District of Columbia -- 1-11. Florida -- 1-12. Georgia -- 1- 13. Hawaii -- 1-14. Idaho -- 1-15. Illinois -- 1-16. Indiana - - 1-17. Iowa -- 1-18. Kansas 1-19. Kentucky -- 1-20. Louisiana -- 1-21. Maine -- 1-22. Maryland -- 1-23. Massachusetts -- 1-24. Michigan -- 1-25. Minnesota -- 1-26. Mississippi -- 1-27. Missouri -- 1-28. Montana -- 1-29. Nebraska -- 1-30. Nevada -- 1-31. New Hampshire -- 1-32. New Jersey -- 1-33. New Mexico -- 1-34. New York (2 v.) -- 1-35. North Carolina -- 1-36. North Dakota -- 1-37. Ohio -- 1-38. Oklahoma -- 1-39. Oregon -- 1-40. Pennsylvania (2 v.) -- 1- 41. Rhode Island -- 1-42. South Carolina -- 1-43. South Dakota -- 1-44. Tennessee -- 1-46. Utah -- 1-47. Vermont -- 1-48. Virginia -- 1-49. Washington -- 1-50. West Virginia -- 1-51. Wisconsin -- 1-52. Wyoming -- 1-53. Puerto Rico -- 1-55. Virgin Islands of United States.

3161.   . (1948). United States. Census Office. 11th census, 1890Eleventh census of the United States, 1890 schedules enumerating Union veterans and widows of Union veterans of the Civil War . Washington : National Archives.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14455688.  Other: United States. Census Office. 11th census, 1890. United States. National Archives. Schedules enumerating Union veterans and widows of Union veterans of the Civil War.
Abstract: "File microcopies of records in the National Archives, no. 123." Schedules for the states of Alabama through Kansas were misplaced or destroyed prior to their transfer to the National Archives in 1943. "Part of a body of records in the National Archives designated as Record Group no. 15, Records of the Veterans' Administration." reel 1-3. Kentucky -- reel 4-5. Louisiana -- reel 6-7. Maine - - reel 8-10. Maryland -- reel 11-16. Massachusetts -- reel 17- 21. Michigan -- reel 22-25. Minnesota -- reel 26. Mississippi -- reel 27-34. Missouri -- reel 35. Montana -- reel 36-38. Nebraska -- reel 39. Nevada -- reel 40. New Hampshire -- reel 41-43. New Jersey -- reel 44. New Mexico -- reel 45-57. New York -- reel 58. North Carolina -- reel 59. North Dakota -- reel 60-75. Ohio -- reel 76. Oklahoma and Indian Territories - - reel 77. Oregon -- reel 78-91. Pennsylvania -- reel 92. Rhode Island -- reel 93. South Carolina -- reel 94. South Dakota -- reel 95-98. Tennessee -- reel 99-102. Texas -- reel 103. Utah -- reel 104. U.S. vessels and Navy yards -- reel 105. Vermont -- reel 106-107. Virginia -- reel 108. Washington -- reel 109-110. West Virginia -- reel 111-116. Wisconsin -- reel 117. Wyoming -- reel 118. Washington, D.C. Miscellaneous (California-Kansas).

3162.   United States Claims Court. No. 19, No. 189-A.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3163.   United States.  Congress. (1979). Acquire Lands for the Mille Lacs Band of Minnesota Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 80-S961-10. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:M61, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+37 p.

3164.   United States.  Congress. (1980). Acquisition of Lands for the Benefit of the Mille Lacs Band of Minnesota Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 80-S963-2.  Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
7 p.

3165.   United States Congress. Act of June 18, 1934.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3166.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Administration of Indian Programs by the Environmental Protection Agency, CIS-NO: 90-S411-8. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-412, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+560 p.

3167.   United States.  Congress. (1922). Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1996. Part 7: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 95-H181-59, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:AG8/996/PT.7, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+1563+xiii p. il. Index.

3168.   United States. Congress. (1977). American Indian Policy Review Commission, Final Report.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[Volume 1, p. 89]

3169.   United States.  Congress. (1994). American Indian Religious Freedom Act Amendments of 1994, CIS-NO: 95-H581-8, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-92, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iv+206 p.

3170.   United States.  Congress. (1993). American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Part I, CIS-NO: 93-H581-7. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-7/PT.1, CIS/Index
). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+129 p.

3171.   United States.  Congress. (1993). American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Part II, CIS-NO: 93-H581-13. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-7/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+323 p.

3172.   United States.  Congress. (1918). Anti-Indian Violence, CIS-NO: 89-H521-76. (SUDOC: Y4.J89/1:100/119, CIS/Index). Committee on the Judiciary. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+440 p.

3173.   United States.  Congress. (1912). Anti-Recession Infrastructure Jobs Act of 1992, CIS-NO: 92-H641-42. (SUDOC: Y4.P96/11:102-55, CIS/Index). Committee on Public Works and Transportation. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
xxviii+617 p. il.

3174.   United States.  Congress. (1923). Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. Part 2, CIS-NO: 70-H441-12. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:91-9/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+199-435 p.

3175.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Authorizing the Lease of Lands on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation for a Term Not To Exceed 99 Years, CIS-NO: 90-H443-45. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:101-686, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3176.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Authorizing the Secretary of the Interior To Disburse Certain Trust Funds, CIS-NO: 81-S963-5. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:97-296, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
7 p.

3177.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Authorizing the Secretary of the Interior To Disburse Trust Funds of the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, CIS-NO: 81-H443-25. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:97-348, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3178.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Act, CIS-NO: 97-H653-52, CIS. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:105-351, CIS/Index). Committee on Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3179.   United States.  Congress. (1988). Clarifying the Federal Relationship to the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians As a Distinct Indian Tribe, To Clarify the Status of Members of the Band, To Transfer Title to Trust Land, CIS-NO: 88-S413-7. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:100-414, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
14 p.

3180.   United States.  Congress. (1988). Clarifying the Federal Relationship to the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians As a Distinct Indian Tribe, To Clarify the Status of Members of the Band, To Transfer Title to Trust Lands, CIS-NO: 88-H443-12. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:100-584, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
8 p.

3181.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Coast Guard Miscellaneous, Part 2, CIS-NO: 84-H561-15. (SUDOC: Y4.M53:98-30, CIS/Index ). Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+283 p.

3182.   United States.  Congress. (1973). Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act Amendments, 1973, CIS-NO: 73-S541-37. (SUDOC: Y4.L11/2:Al1/3/973, CIS/Index). Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+441 p. il.

3183.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Confronting the Impact of Alcohol Labeling and Marketing on Native American Health and Culture, CIS-NO: 92-H961-55. (SUDOC: Y4.C43/2:Al1/3, CIS/Index). Committee on Children, Youth, and Families, Select. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+151 p.

3184.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Consolidated Tribal Government Programs, CIS-NO: 82-H441-5. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:97-4, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+200 p.

3185.   United States.  Congress. (1919). Death Penalty, CIS-NO: 91-S521-42. (SUDOC: Y4.J89/2:S.hrg.101-1256, CIS/Index). Committee on the Judiciary. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+1197 p. il.

3186.   United States.  Congress. (1971). Declaring that Certain Federally Owned Land is Held by the U.S. in Trust for the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 71-H443-24.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
3 p.

3187.   United States.  Congress. (1974). Declaring that Certain Mineral Interests are Held by the U.S. in Trust For the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Mont, CIS-NO: 74-S443-14 .  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
5 p.

3188.   United States.  Congress. (1974). Declaring that Certain Mineral Interests are Held by the U.S. in Trust for the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Mont, CIS-NO: 74-H443-47 .  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
6 p.

3189.   United States.  Congress. (1920). Department of Education Act, Part 2, CIS-NO: 78-S401-50. (SUDOC: Y4.G74/9:Ed8/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Governmental Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ix+924 p.

3190.   United States.  Congress. (1918). Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Certain Independent Agencies Appropriations, FY81, Part 2, CIS-NO: 81-S181-3. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:H81/2/981/pt.2, CIS/Index ). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+1273-2553+xiii p. Index

3191.   United States.  Congress. (1915). Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Certain Independent Agencies Appropriations, FY88. Part 3: Nondepartmental Witnesses, CIS-NO: 87-S181-37. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:S.hrg.100-106/pt.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+1291-2030+x p. il. Index.

3192.   United States.  Congress. (1910). Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Certain Independent Agencies Appropriations, FY89. Part 3: Nondepartmental Witnesses, CIS-NO: 89-S181-6. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:S.hrg.100-799/pt.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+1217-1921+x p. il. Index.

3193.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Department of Housing and Urban Development; Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1988. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 87-H181-73. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:H81/2/988/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+776+viii p. Index.

3194.   United States.  Congress. (1988). Department of Housing and Urban Development; Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1989. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 88-H181-57. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:H81/2/989/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1016+iii p. il.

3195.   United States.  Congress. (1910). . Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1974, Part 6, CIS-NO: 73-H181-37. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/974/pt.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+753+iv p. il. Index

3196.   United States.  Congress. (1974). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1975, Part 5, CIS-NO: 74-H181-42. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/975/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1128+vii p. Index.

3197.   United States.  Congress. (1977). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1978. Part 9: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Individuals and Organizations , CIS-NO: 77-H181-66. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/978/pt.9, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
: iii+880+v p. il.

3198.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1979. Part 8: Testimony of Public Witnesses, CIS-NO: 78-H181-72. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/979/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+670+iii p.

3199.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1979. Part 9: Testimony of Public Witnesses, CIS-NO: 78-H181-73. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/979/pt.9, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+655+iv p.

3200.   United States.  Congress. (1919). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1980, Part 6, CIS-NO: 79-H181-59. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/980/pt.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1438+iv p. il.

3201.   United States.  Congress. (1980). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1981. Part 4: Testimony of Public Witnesses, CIS-NO: 80-H181-48. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/981/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1304+iv p. il.

3202.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1982. Part 4: Testimony of Public Witnesses, CIS-NO: 81-H181-55. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/982/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1448+vii p. il. Index.

3203.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1983. Part 4: Testimony of Public Witnesses, CIS-NO: 82-H181-22. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/983/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1132+vi p. il. Index.

3204.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1984, Part 4, CIS-NO: 83-H181-12. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/984/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+932+v p.

3205.   United States.  Congress. (1984). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1985, Part 4, CIS-NO: 84-H181-22. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/985/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+901+v p.

3206.   United States.  Congress. (1918). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1986, Part 6, CIS-NO: 85-H181-39. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/986/pt.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1453+vi p.

3207.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1987. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 86-H181-73. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/987/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+661+iii p. il. Index

3208.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1988. Part 12: Bureau of Indian Affairs, CIS-NO: 88-H181-1. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/988/pt.12, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+371+vi p. il. Index.

3209.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1988. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 87-H181-23. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/988/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+784+iv p.

3210.   United States.  Congress. (1988). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1989. Part 4: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 88-H181-28. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/989/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+774+iv p. il.

3211.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1990. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 89-H181-23. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/990/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1083+vi p. il.

3212.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1991. Part 7: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 90-H181-49. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/991/pt.7, CIS/Index ). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1034+v p. il.

3213.   United States.  Congress. (1991). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1992. Part 8: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 91-H181-33. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/992/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1163+vii p.

3214.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1993. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 92-H181-29. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:In8/6/993/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1379+v p. il. Index.

3215.   United States.  Congress. (1929). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1994. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 93-H181-12. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/994/PT.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1523+vi p. il.

3216.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1995. Part 8: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 94-H181-65, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/995/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1186+vi p. il.

3217.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1996. Part 5: Testimony of Public Witnesses for Indian Programs, CIS-NO: 95-H181-19, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/996/PT.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+780+iv p. il.

3218.   United States.  Congress. (1996). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1997, Part 5, CIS-NO: 96-H181-33, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/997/PT.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
: ii+939+xii p. il. Index.

3219.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1998, Part 6, CIS-NO: 97-H181-14, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/998/PT.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+671+vii p. Index.

3220.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1999, Part 6, CIS-NO: 98-H181-17, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:IN8/6/999/PT.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
i+665+vii p. il. Index.

3221.   United States.  Congress. (1999). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for 2000, Part 6, CIS-NO: 99-H181-32, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:105-116, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+100 p.

3222.   United States.  Congress. (1931). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for FY71. Part 4, CIS-NO: 70-S181-9. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/971/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+3645-4830+clx p. il. Index.

3223.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations for FY79, Part 4, CIS-NO: 79-S181-20. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/979/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+820+xxvi p., Index

3224.   United States.  Congress. (1974). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY75, Part 3, CIS-NO: 74-S181-38. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/975/pt.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1305-2738+lxxvii p. Index

3225.   United States.  Congress. (1976). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY77, Part 5, CIS-NO: 76-S181-58. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/977/pt.5, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+1765-3001+xiv p. il. Index

3226.   United States.  Congress. (1977). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY78. Part 5: Nondepartmental Witnesses, CIS-NO: 77-S181-51. (., SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/978/pt.5, CIS/Index ). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+1801-2515-xviii p. il. Index

3227.   United States.  Congress. (1915). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY81, Part 1, CIS-NO: 81-S181-14. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/981/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+1095+xviii p. il. Index

3228.   United States.  Congress. (1919). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY82, Part 1, CIS-NO: 82-S181-2. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/982/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+970+xviii p. il. Index.

3229.   United States.  Congress. (1922). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY83, Part 1, CIS-NO: 83-S181-9. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:In8/983/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+920+xv p. il. Index

3230.   United States.  Congress. (1911). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY89, Part 2, CIS-NO: 89-S181-9. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:S.hrg.100-822/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+1322+xv p. il. Index.

3231.   United States.  Congress. (1927). Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations, FY90, Part 1 , CIS-NO: 90-S181-4. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/2:S.hrg.101-358/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+967+xiv p. il. Index.

3232.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Department of the Interior's Denial of the Wisconsin Chippewa's Casino Applications, Vol. 1, CIS-NO: 98-H401-112, CIS.  Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
v+1006 p. il.

3233.   United States.  CongressDepartment of the Interior's Denial of the Wisconsin Chippewa's Casino Applications, Vol. 2, CIS-NO: 98-H401-113, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.G74/7:D41/V.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+1169 p.

3234.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Department of the Interior's Denial of the Wisconsin Chippewa's Casino Applications, Vol. 3, CIS-NO: 98-H401-114, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.G74/7:D41/V.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+718 p

3235.   United States.  Congress. (1926). Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1995. Part 7: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 94-H181-57, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:C73/2/995/PT.7, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1160+iv p. il.

3236.   United States.  Congress. (1926-1993). Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1994. Part 7: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 93-H181-50. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:C73/2/994/PT.7, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1131+iv p. il.

3237.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1988. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 87-H181-61. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:L11/988/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+969+vii p. Index.

3238.   United States.  Congress. (1914). Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1987. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 86-H181-55. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:L11/987/pt.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+880+vii p. il. Index

3239.   United States.  Congress. (1910). Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations for 1980, Part 9, CIS-NO: 79-H181-57. (SUDOC: Y4.Ap6/1:St2/980/pt.9, CIS/Index ). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+605+ii p. il.

3240.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1999. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 98-H181-70. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:V64/4/999/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
i+2003+xi p. il. Index

3241.   United States.  Congress. (1930). Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1998. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 97-H181-53, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:V64/4/998/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+1375+ix p. il. Index.

3242.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1996. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 95-H181-82, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:V64/4/996/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+876+iii p.

3243.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1995. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 94-H181-44, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:V64/4/995/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1270+v p. il. Index.,

3244.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1994. Part 8: Testimony of Members of Congress and Other Interested Individuals and Organizations, CIS-NO: 93-H181-65. (SUDOC: Y4.AP6/1:V64/4/994/PT.8, CIS/Index). Committee on Appropriations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ii+1363+xi p. il. Index.

3245.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Direct Funding Through Block Grants, CIS-NO: 95-S411-26, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.104-131, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iv+246 p.

3246.   United States.  Congress. (1980). Directing the Secretary of the Interior To Acquire Certain Lands for the Benefit of the Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 80-H443-51.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
8 p.

3247.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Disbursal of Lac Courte Oreilles Band Trust Funds, CIS-NO: 82-S961-5. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:L11, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+61 p. il.

3248.   United States.  Congress. (1915). DOE Radioactive Waste Repository Program, CIS-NO: 87-H361-5. (SUDOC: Y4.En2/3:99-102, CIS/Index). Committee on Energy and Commerce. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+1114 p.

3249.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Draft Bill of the Indian Fish and Wildlife Resource Management Act of 1993, Part 1, CIS-NO: 94-S411-1, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-278/PT.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+195 p.

3250.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Economic and Fiscal Conditions in Rural America, CIS-NO: 86-H261-9. (SUDOC: Y4.B85/3:99-13, CIS/Index). Committee on the Budget. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+161 p.

3251.   United States.  Congress. (1928). Education Amendments of 1971, Part 4, CIS-NO: 71-S541-36. (SUDOC: Y4.L11/2:Ed8/27/pt.4, CIS/Index). Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+1677-2177 p.

3252.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Environmental Justice, CIS-NO: 95-H521-24, CIS.  SUDOC: Y4.J89/1:103/64, CIS/Index.  Committee on the Judiciary. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+184 p.

3253.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Environmental Protection Agency Cabinet Elevation: Environmental Equity Issues, CIS-NO: 95-H401-47, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.G74/7:EN8/26, CIS/Index). Committee on Government Operations. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+271 p.

3254.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Establish Federal Standards and Regulations for the Conduct of Gaming Activities Within Indian Country, CIS-NO: 87-S411-5. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.99-887, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+673 p.

3255.   United States.  Congress. (1970). Establishment of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin, CIS-NO: 70-H443-40.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
15 p.

3256.   United States.  CongressFamily Enterprise Estate and Gift Tax Equity Act and Miscellaneous Tax Bills, CIS-NO: 81-S361-16. (SUDOC: Y4.F49:F21/9, CIS/Index). Committee on Finance. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+514 p.

3257.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Federal Acknowledgment Administrative Procedures Act of 1989, Part 2, CIS-NO: 89-S411-40. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-270/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+457 p.

3258.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Federal Death Penalty Legislation, CIS-NO: 91-H521-9. (SUDOC: Y4.J89/1:101/95, CIS/Index). Committee on the Judiciary. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+671 p.

3259.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Federal Death Penalty Legislation, CIS-NO: 91-H521-9. (SUDOC: Y4.J89/1:101/95, CIS/Index). Committee on the Judiciary. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+671 p

3260.   United States.  Congress. (1971). Federal Lands In Trust for Tribes In Minnesota and Wisconsin, CIS-NO: 72-S441. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/13:T73/3, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+72 p.

3261.   United States.  Congress. (1970). Federally Owned Land in Trust for the Lac Du Flambeau Band of Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 70-S443-16.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
3 p.

3262.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Field Hearing on H.R. 6, the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, CIS-NO: 97-H341-18, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.ED8/1:105-19, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and the Workforce. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+129 p.

3263.   United States.  Congress. (1912). Fish and Wildlife Miscellaneous, Part 3, CIS-NO: 79-H561-6. (SUDOC: Y4.M53:95-46, CIS/Index). Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+300 p.

3264.   United States.  Congress. (1983). FY84 Budget, CIS-NO: 83-S961-18. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-244, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+823 p. il.

3265.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Gambling on Indian Reservations and Lands, CIS-NO: 86-S411-1. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.99-207 , CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+708 p. il.

3266.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Gaming Activities on Indian Reservations and Lands, CIS-NO: 88-S411-7. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.100-341, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+512 p.

3267.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Gaming Regulatory Improvement Act, Part 2, CIS-NO: 99-S411-2. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-532/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+172 p.

3268.   United States.  Congress. (1998). H.R. 3658, a Bill To Provide for the Settlement of the Water Rights Claims of the Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, and for Other Purposes, CIS-NO: 99-H651-14.  Vol. H.R. 3658(SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:105-112, CIS/Index). Committee on Resources. House .
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+49 p.

3269.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Health Care Reform in Indian Country, Oversight of the Indian Health Service , CIS-NO: 94-S411-26, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-752, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+242 p. il.

3270.   United States.  Congress. (1916). Hearings on Training Issues, CIS-NO: 95-H321-14, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.ED8/1:104-12, CIS/Index). Committee on Economic and Educational Opportunities. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
vi+672 p.

3271.   United States.  Congress. (1918). Housing and Community Development Act of 1989, CIS-NO: 90-H241-29. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:101-29, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
viii+1860 p. il.

3272.   United States.  CongressHousing Assistance for Indians and Alaska Natives, CIS-NO: 88-S411-24. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.100-795, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+285 p.

3273.   United States.  Congress. (1973). Impact of Federal Policies on Employment, Poverty, and Other Programs, 1973, Part 2, CIS-NO: 73-S541-67. (SUDOC: Y4.L11/2:F31/4/973/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
ix+559-1359 p. il.

3274.   United States.  Congress. (1991). Impact of Supreme Court's Ruling in Duro v. Reina, Part 1, CIS-NO: 91-S411-28. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.102-158/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+311 p.

3275.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Implementation and Enforcement of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, Public Law 100-497, CIS-NO: 92-H441-88. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:102-37, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+235 p.

3276.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Implementation of Amendments to the Indian Self-Determination Act, CIS-NO: 90-S411-6. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-386, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+420 p.

3277.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Implementation of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, Part 2, CIS-NO: 92-S411-24. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.102-660/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+298 p.

3278.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Implementation of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, Part 3, CIS-NO: 93-S411-2. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.102-660/PT.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+391 p.

3279.   United States.  Congress. (1980). Indian and Alaskan Native Housing Programs, CIS-NO: 80-H241-30. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:96-53, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+311 p. il.

3280.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, CIS-NO: 81-H441-14. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:96-42, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+303 p.

3281.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Dams Safety Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 93-H581-34. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-33, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+90 p.

3282.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Economic Development, Part I, CIS-NO: 93-H581-19. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-18/PT.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+257 p.

3283.   United States.  CongressIndian Education, Oversight. Part 2: School Construction, Johnson-O'Malley, CIS-NO: 78-H341-34. (SUDOC: Y4.Ed8/1:In2/10/977-2/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and Labor. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+261 p.

3284.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Indian Finance Corporation Act, CIS-NO: 91-S411-10. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-1131, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+281 p.

3285.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Fish and Wildlife Enhancement, CIS-NO: 93-H581-4. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-5, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+283 p.

3286.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Fish and Wildlife Resource Enhancement Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 94-H581-39, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-49, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+183 p.

3287.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Fish and Wildlife Resources Management Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 94-S411-11, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-82, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+219 p.

3288.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Indian Fishing Rights, CIS-NO: 78-H561-14. (SUDOC: Y4.M53:95-27, CIS/Index). : Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+325 p.

3289.   United States.  CongressIndian Fishing Rights; Fishery Management, CIS-NO: 81-H561-17. (SUDOC: Y4.M53:96-54, CIS/Index). Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+540 p.

3290.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Indian Gambling Control Act, Part II, CIS-NO: 88-H441-8. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:99-55/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+189 p.

3291.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, CIS-NO: 89-H441-28. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:100-70, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+492 p.

3292.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, Part 2, CIS-NO: 95-S411-3, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-709/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+206 p.

3293.   United States.  Congress. (1991). Indian Health and Tribal Economic Development, CIS-NO: 93-H441-4. (SUDOC: Y4.IN8/14:102-60, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+246 p.

3294.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Indian Health Care Act Amendments of 1992, CIS-NO: 92-S411-27. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.102-764, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+357 p. il.

3295.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Indian Health Facilities, CIS-NO: 90-S411-18. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-640, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+619 p. il.

3296.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Indian Health Issues, Billings, Mont, CIS-NO: 83-S961-23. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-362, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+211 p.

3297.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Indian Health Issues, Grand Forks, N. Dak, CIS-NO: 83-S961-22. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-297 , CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+399 p. il.

3298.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Indian Health Oversight, CIS-NO: 84-S961-9. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-649, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+128 p.

3299.   United States.  Congress. (1914). Indian Housing Act of 1982, CIS-NO: 83-H441-24. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:97-31, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vii+577 p. il.

3300.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Indian Housing Act of 1983, CIS-NO: 83-S961-17. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-216, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+127 p.

3301.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Indian Housing Act of 1983, CIS-NO: 85-H441-44. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:98-42, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+213 p.

3302.   United States.  Congress. (1988). Indian Housing Act of 1988, CIS-NO: 88-H241-21. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:100-52, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+159 p.

3303.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Indian Issues Regarding Head Start Reauthorization, CIS-NO: 94-S411-22, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-678, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+197 p.+errata.

3304.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Indian Juvenile Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Prevention, Part I, CIS-NO: 86-H441-18. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:99-15/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vii+571 p. il.

3305.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Indian Lands Open Dump Cleanup Act of 1994, CIS-NO: 95-H581-9, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-102, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+93 p.

3306.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Indian Lands Open Dumps Clean-Up Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 94-S411-12, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-460, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+86 p.

3307.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Indian Mineral Development, CIS-NO: 82-S961-11. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:M66, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+199 p.

3308.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Indian Provisions Contained in the Tobacco Settlement Between the Attorneys General and the Tobacco Industry, CIS-NO: 98-S411-11, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-301, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+66 p.

3309.   United States.  CongressIndian Reserved Water Rights, CIS-NO: 85-S312-2. (SUDOC: Y4.En2:S.prt.98-280, CIS/Index). Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
x+404 p. il.

3310.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Indian Tribal Government Waste Management Act of 1992, CIS-NO: 92-S411-34. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.102-826, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+133 p.

3311.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Indian Tribal Justice Act, CIS-NO: 92-H441-81. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:102-53, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+157 p.

3312.   United States.  Congress. (1992). Indian Trust Fund Management, CIS-NO: 93-S411-11. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.102-939, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+254 p.

3313.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Indian Water Rights, CIS-NO: 99-S411-8, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-532/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+172 p.

3314.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Investigation of Indian Health Service, CIS-NO: 86-S411-8. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.99-277, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+125 p.

3315.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Iroquois Confederacy of Nations, CIS-NO: 88-S411-22. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.100-610, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+392 p.

3316.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Judgment Funds of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, CIS-NO: 98-S411-13, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-413, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+39 p.

3317.   United States.  Congress. (1987). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 100-153, Indian Law Technical Amendments of 1987, CIS-NO: 87-PL100-153.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3318.   United States.  Congress. (1988). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 100-420, Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Act, CIS-NO: 88-PL100-420, CIS. (CIS/Index).
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3319.   United States.  Congress. (1990). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 101-301, Miscellaneous Indian Law Amendments, CIS-NO: 90-PL101-301, CIS. (CIS/Index).
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
7 p.

3320.   United States.  Congress. (1990). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 101-630, Indian Land Conveyances, Forest Management, Child Abuse Prevention, and Health Care Programs, CIS-NO: 90-PL101-630, CIS. (CIS/Index).
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
38 p.

3321.   United States.  Congress. (1996). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 104-109, Technical Corrections to Native American Laws, CIS-NO: 96-PL104-109, CIS. (CIS/Index).
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
5 p.

3322.   United States.  Congress. (1997). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 105-143, Michigan Indian Land Claims Settlement Act, CIS-NO: 97-PL105-143, CIS.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
15 p.

3323.   United States.  Congress. (1972). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 92-441, Indians, Lac du Flambeau Band, Wis., lands in trust, CIS-NO: 72-PL92-441.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
1 p.

3324.   United States.  Congress. (1971). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 92-59, Pembina Band of Chippewa Indians, judgment funds disposition, CIS-NO: 71-PL92-59.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
2 p.

3325.   United States.  Congress. (1974). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 93-285, Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Mont., mineral rights held in trust, CIS-NO: 74-PL93-285.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
1 p.

3326.   United States.  Congress. (1978). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 95-571, Minnesota Chippewa Indians, Mille Lacs Band, land acquisition, CIS-NO: 78-PL95-571.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
1 p.

3327.   United States.  Congress. (1981). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 97-112, Lac Courte Oreilles Indians, trust fund disbursement, CIS-NO: 81-PL97-112.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
1 p.

3328.   United States.  Congress. (1982). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 97-403, Pembina Chippewa Indians, distribution and use of funds, CIS-NO: 82-PL97-403.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3329.   United States.  Congress. (1983). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 98-123, Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, distribution and use of funds, CIS-NO: 83-PL98-123.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
2 p.

3330.   United States.  Congress. (1985). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 99-146, Chippewas of Lake Superior, Judgment Funds, CIS-NO: 85-PL99-146.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
3 p.

3331.   United States.  Congress. (1986). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 99-264, White Earth Reservation Land Settlement Act of 1985, CIS-NO: 86-PL99-264.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
10 p.

3332.   United States.  Congress. (1986). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 99-346, Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan Distribution of Judgment Funds Act, CIS-NO: 86-PL99-346.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
6 p.

3333.   United States.  Congress. (1986). LEGISLATIVE HISTORY OF: P.L. 99-377, Chippewas of the Mississippi, Judgment Funds, CIS-NO: 86-PL99-377.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
2 p.

3334.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Making Miscellaneous Amendments to Indian Laws, CIS-NO: 89-S413-12. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:101-226, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
19 p.

3335.   United States.  Congress. (1987). Making Miscellaneous Technical and Minor Amendments to Laws Relating to Indians, CIS-NO: 87-S413-8. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:100-186, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
24 p.

3336.   United States.  Congress. (1920). Meetings of the American Indian Policy Review Commission, Vol. 2, CIS-NO: 77-S962-17. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:Am3/v. 2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+354 p.

3337.   United States.  Congress. (1973). Menominee Restoration Act, CIS-NO: 73-H441-32. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:93-20, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+398 p.

3338.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Michigan Indians Recognition, CIS-NO: 95-H581-34, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-47, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+431 p. il.

3339.   United States.  Congress. (1989). Miscellaneous Parks and Public Lands Measures, CIS-NO: 90-S311-14. (SUDOC: Y4.En2:S.hrg.101-453/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+164 p.

3340.   United States.  Congress. (1979). Montana Water Rights, CIS-NO: 80-S961-5. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:M76, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
v+598 p.

3341.   United States.  Congress. (1995). National American Indian Policy Information Center Act of 1995, CIS-NO: 96-S411-8, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.104-376, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+86 p.

3342.   United States.  Congress. (1994). National Health Care Reform and Its Implications for Indian Health Care, CIS-NO: 95-S411-2, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-770, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+128 p.

3343.   United States.  Congress. (1987). National Health Service Corps Reauthorization, CIS-NO: 87-H361-81. (SUDOC: Y4.En2/3:100-3, CIS/Index). Committee on Energy and Commerce. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+74 p.

3344.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Native American Financial Services Organization Act of 1995, CIS-NO: 95-S411-28, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.104-180, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iv+184 p.

3345.   United States.  Congress. (1996). Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996, CIS-NO: 97-H241-2, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:104-46, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking and Financial Services. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+88 p.

3346.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Native American Trust Fund Accounting and Management Reform Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 93-S411-29. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-225, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+108 p.

3347.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Nomination of Harold Monteau To Serve As Chairman, National Indian Gaming Commission and Gary Kimble To Serve As Commissioner, Administration for Native Americans, CIS-NO: 95-S411-18, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-961, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+36 p.

3348.   United States.  Congress. (1981). Oil and Gas Leases on Indian Lands (Part 1), CIS-NO: 81-S961-13. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:Oi5/pt.1, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+117 p. il.

3349.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Old Age Assistance Bill, CIS-NO: 83-S961-24.  Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+35 p.

3350.   United States.  Congress. (1975). Omnibus Submarginal Land Transfers, CIS-NO: 75-H441-33. (., SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:94-15, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+59 p. il.

3351.   United States.  Congress. (1991). Oversight Hearings on Job Services for Dislocated Workers, CIS-NO: 92-H341-65. (SUDOC: Y4.Ed8/1:102-97, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and Labor. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+256 p.

3352.   United States.  Congress. (1979). Oversight Hearings on the Implementation of Indian Education Amendments, CIS-NO: 80-H341-23. (SUDOC: Y4.Ed8/1:In2/13, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and Labor. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+847 p. il.

3353.   United States.  Congress. (1919). Oversight Hearings Regarding the Reauthorization of the Institute of Museum Services and the National Endowment for the Arts, Vol. 4, CIS-NO: 90-H341-62. (SUDOC: Y4.Ed8/1:101-106, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and Labor. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+205 p.

3354.   United States.  Congress. (1974). Oversight Investigation of the Small Business Administration, CIS-NO: 75-H241-3. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:Sm1/16/974, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+473 p. il.

3355.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Oversight of Budgets of Indian Programs in Departments of HUD, Education, and HHS, CIS-NO: 82-S961-13. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:H81/4, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate .
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+152 p.

3356.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Oversight of Indirect Costs and Contract Provisions of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, CIS-NO: 83-S961-11. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:In2/14, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+509 p. il.

3357.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Performance of Bureau of Indian Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools, CIS-NO: 95-S411-10, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-923, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iv+886 p. il.

3358.   United States.  Congress. (1978). Problems of Entry into Family Farming, CIS-NO: 79-S721-11. (SUDOC: Y4.Sm1/2:F22/3, CIS/Index). Committee on Small Business. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+362 p. il.

3359.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Proposed Amendments to the American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Part 3, CIS-NO: 93-S411-18. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.103-6/PT.3, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+363 p.

3360.   United States.  Congress. (1984). Provide for the Use and Distribution of Saginaw Chippewa Tribe of Michigan Judgment Funds in Dockets Numbered 59 and 13E, Before the U.S. Claims Court, CIS-NO: 84-S963-21. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:98-608, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
10 p.

3361.   United States.  Congress. (1971). Providing for the Disposition of Judgment Funds of the Pembina Band of Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 71-S443-13.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
9 p.

3362.   United States.  Congress. (1971). Providing for the Disposition of Judgment Funds of the Pembina Band of Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 71-H443-4.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
9 p.

3363.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Providing for the Division, Use, and Distribution of Judgment Funds of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, CIS-NO: 97-H653-53, CIS. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:105-352, CIS/Index). Committee on Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
11 p.,

3364.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Appropriated in Satisfaction of Judgment Awarded to Members of the Mississippi Band of Chippewa Indians, CIS-NO: 86-S413-2. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:99-309, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3365.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Appropriated in Satisfaction of Judgment Awarded to Members of the Mississippi Band of Chippewa Indians Who Are Members of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe in Docket Numbered 18-S Before the Indian Claims Commission, CIS-NO: 85-H443-28. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:99-269, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3366.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Appropriated in Satisfaction of Judgments Awarded to the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe of Michigan in Dockets Numbered 57, 59, and 13E of the Indian Claims Commission and Docket Numbered 13F of the U.S. Claims Court, CIS-NO: 86-H443-6. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:99-502, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
11 p.

3367.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Appropriated in Satisfaction of Judgments Awarded to Members of the Lake Superior Band of Chippewa Indians Who Are Members of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe in Dockets Numbered 18-S and 18-U Before the Indian Claims Commission, CIS-NO: 85-H443-27.  Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
7 p.

3368.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Appropriated in Satisfaction of Judgments Awarded to the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe of Michigan In Dockets Numbered 57, 59, and 13E of the Indian Claims Commission and Docket Number 13F of the U.S. Claims Court, CIS-NO: 85-S413-4. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:99-119, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
11 p.

3369.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded the Pembina Chippewa Indians in Dockets Numbered 113, 191, 221, and 246 of the Court of Claims, CIS-NO: 82-H443-71. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:97-937, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
9 p.

3370.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded the Pembina Chippewa Indians in Dockets Numbered 113, 191, 221, and 246 of the Court of Claims, CIS-NO: 82-S963-13. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:97-655, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
9 p.

3371.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in Docket Numbered 15-72 of the U.S. Court of Claims, CIS-NO: 83-H443-35. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:98-389, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
4 p.

3372.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Providing for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in Docket Numbered 15-72 of the U.S. Court of Claims, CIS-NO: 83-S963-4. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:98-74, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
3 p.

3373.   United States.  Congress. (1984). Providing for the Use and Distribution of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Bands of Chippewa Indians Judgment Funds in Docket 18-S and the Lake Superior Band of Chippewa Indians Judgment Funds in Docket 18-U, Before the Indian Claims Commission, CIS-NO: 84-H443-48. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:98-989, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
7 p.

3374.   United States.  Congress. (1984). Providing for the Use and Distribution of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Bands of Chippewa Indians Judgment Funds in Docket 18-S and the Lake Superior Band of Chippewa Indians Judgment Funds in Docket 18-U, Before the Indian Claims Commission, CIS-NO: 84-S963-6. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:98-407, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
8 p.

3375.   United States.  Congress. (1912). Public Land Management Policy (Public Lands Conservation, Rehabilitation, and Improvement Act), Part VI, CIS-NO: 83-H441-10. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:97-8/pt.6, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+341 p. il.

3376.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Realinement [sic] of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, CIS-NO: 84-S961-6. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:R22, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+284 p. il.

3377.   United States.  Congress. (1929). Reauthorization of Housing and Community Development Programs for FY93, Part 2, CIS-NO: 93-H241-9. (SUDOC: Y4.B22/1:102-108/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+957 p. il.

3378.   United States.  Congress. (1984). Reauthorization of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, Part 2, CIS-NO: 84-S961-15. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-797/pt.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vi+467 p.

3379.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Reauthorization of the Tribally Controlled College Assistance Act of 1978, CIS-NO: 90-S411-19. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-692, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+137 p. il.

3380.   United States.  Congress. (1975). Review of Community Action Programs, 1975, CIS-NO: 77-S541-20. (SUDOC: Y4.L11/2:C73/10/975, CIS/Index). : Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+52 p.

3381.   United States.  Congress. (1984). S. 2061, S. 2177, CIS-NO: 84-S961-12. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-689, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+56 p.

3382.   United States.  Congress. (1984). S. 2823, S. 2824, S. 2862, CIS-NO: 85-S411-3. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-1028, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+136 p.

3383.   United States.  Congress. (1983). S. 727, S. 884, S. 973, CIS-NO: 83-S961-13. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-171, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+72 p.

3384.   United States.  Congress. (1986). Settling Unresolved Claims Relating to Certain Allotted Indian Lands on the White Earth Indian Reservation, To Remove Clouds from the Titles to Certain Lands, CIS-NO: 86-H443-3. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:99-489, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
9 p.

3385.   United States.  Congress. (1985). Settling Unresolved Claims Relating to Certain Allotted Indian Lands on the White Earth Indian Reservation, To Remove Clouds from the Titles to Certain Lands, CIS-NO: 85-S413-8. (SUDOC: Y1.1/5:99-192, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
21 p.

3386.   United States.  Congress. (1973-1974). Small Business Opportunities in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism, CIS-NO: 74-H721-6. (SUDOC: Y4.Sm1:Ou8/974, CIS/Index). Committee on Small Business. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
vii+627 p. il. 2 foldouts

3387.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Sovereign Immunity, Part 2, CIS-NO: 98-S411-21. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-303/PT.2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
v+1640 p. il.

3388.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Standing Rock Sioux Reservation: A Case Study of Food Security Among Native Americans, CIS-NO: 90-H961-32. (SUDOC: Y4.H89:101-15, CIS/Index). Committee on Hunger, Select. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+208 p. il.

3389.   United States.  Congress. (1979). Statute of Limitations Extension, CIS-NO: 80-S961-9. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:St2/2, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+380 p.

3390.   United States.  Congress. (1975). Submarginal Lands and Trust Lands for Certain Indian Tribes, CIS-NO: 75-S441-96. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/13:In2/40, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+141 p.

3391.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Swan Creek Black River Confederated Ojibwa Tribes, CIS-NO: 99-H651-21. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-856, CIS/Index). Committee on Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+100 p.

3392.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Technical Corrections to Native American Laws, CIS-NO: 95-H653-56, CIS. (SUDOC: Y1.1/8:104-444, CIS/Index). Committee on Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
18 p.

3393.   United States.  Congress. (1985). To Provide for the Use and Distribution of Funds Awarded to the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe of Michigan, CIS-NO: 86-S411-6. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.99-263, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+153 p.

3394.   United States.  Congress. (1995). Tribal Justice Act, CIS-NO: 96-S411-4, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.104-332, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iii+102 p.

3395.   United States.  Congress. (1994). Tribal Self-Governance Act of 1993, CIS-NO: 95-H581-52, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-70, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+247 p.

3396.   United States.  Congress. (1998). Tribal Self-Governance Amendments of 1998, CIS-NO: 99-S411-14. (SUDOC: Y4.IN2/11:S.HRG.105-856, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
ii+129 p

3397.   United States.  Congress. (1991). Tribal Self-Governance Demonstration Project Act, CIS-NO: 92-S411-3. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.102-396, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+187 p.

3398.   United States.  CongressTribal-State Compact Act of 1978, CIS-NO: 78-S961-12. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:T73, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+388 p.

3399.   United States.  Congress. (1990). Trust Counsel for Indian Affairs in the Department of the Interior, CIS-NO: 91-S411-7. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.101-1011, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+199 p.

3400.   United States.  Congress. (1776). The unanimous declaration of the thirteen united States of America.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3401.   United States.  Congress. (1993). Underground Storage Tanks and Open Dumps on Indian Reservations, CIS-NO: 95-H581-5, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.R31/3:103-50, CIS/Index). Committee on Natural Resources. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+123 p.

3402.   United States.  Congress. (1997). Unemployment Insurance Issues, CIS-NO: 99-H781-12, CIS. (SUDOC: Y4.W36:105-42, CIS/Index). Committee on Ways and Means. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [onlinedatabase], Fall 1999 search
iv+188 p.

3403.   United States.  Congress. (1983). Unresolved Claims on the White Earth Indian Reservation, CIS-NO: 85-S411-1. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.98-936, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+217 p.

3404.   United States.  Congress. (1982). Use and Distribution of Pembina Chippewa Indian Judgment Funds, CIS-NO: 82-S961-18. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:P36, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iii+184 p. il.

3405.   United States.  Congress. (1926). Vocational Education Amendments of 1974, CIS-NO: 75-H341-27. (SUDOC: Y4.Ed8/1:V85/2/974, CIS/Index). Committee on Education and Labor. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
x+1266 p. il.

3406.   United States.  Congress. (1979). Water Resources Development Act of 1979. Part 3: Winter Navigation, CIS-NO: 80-S321-3. (SUDOC: Y4.P96/10:96-H22/pt.3, CIS/Index). Committee on the Environment and Public Works. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+715 p. il.

3407.   United States.  Congress. (1983). White Earth Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota Land Claims, CIS-NO: 85-H441-17. (SUDOC: Y4.In8/14:98-43, CIS/Index). Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. House.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
iv+255 p.

3408.   United States.  Congress. (1985). White Earth Indian Land Claims Settlement, CIS-NO: 86-S411-5. (SUDOC: Y4.In2/11:S.hrg.99-261, CIS/Index). Committee on Indian Affairs, Select. Senate.
Notes: Source: Congressional Information Services, CIS INDEX [online database], Fall 1999 search
xxix+261 p. il.

3409.   . (1888). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs Charles Ruffee  . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31071380
Abstract: Caption title. Report on Indian agent at White Earth Agency and compares the salary at White Earth with those at Leech Lake and Red Lake Agencies.

3410.   . (1890). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsChippewa Indians of Minnesota . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 33956395.  Other: Perkins, Bishop W. (Bishop Walden), 1841- 1894
Abstract: Caption title. Report on amendments to the act of 1889 which calls for land cessions, land sales, removal, and distribution of funds, and allotments on portions of the White Earth and Red Lake Reservations.

3411.   . (1888). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsDuluth, Rainy Lake River and Southwestern Railway Company [Report on right of way for Duluth, Rainy Lake River and Southwestern Railway through Bois Fort and Red Lake Reservations] . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30808527. Caption title. Report on right of way for Duluth, Rainy Lake River and Southwestern Railway through Bois Fort and Red Lake Reservations.  Alt Title: Duluth, Rainy Lake River and Southw'n Railway Co. Other: Nelson, Knute, 1843-1923.

3412.   . (1904). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsIndians of the Red Lake Reservation, Minn.  Report to accompany S.1490 . Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25480310

3413.   . (1933). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsPayment of $100 to enrolled Chippewa Indians of Red Lake Reservation, Minn. : report (to accompany H.R. 5083).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26694747

3414.   . (1940). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsPer capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 8369).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O..
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Caption title. "April 23, 1940."

3415.   . (1939). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsPer capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 3248).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28829704

3416.   . (1938). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsPer capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 8936).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28567595

3417.   . (1937). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsPer-capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 4539).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28524439

3418.   . (1935). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsProviding for payment of $25 to each enrolled Chippewa Indian, Red Lake Band of Minnesota : report (to accompany H.R. 4123).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28102303

3419.   . (1890). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsRed Lake and Western Railway and Navigation Company [Right of way through Red Lake Indian Reservation]  . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 33435096
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

3420.   . (1937). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsRed Lake Band, Chippewa Indians, Minnesota : report (to accompany H.R. 4540).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28524419

3421.   . (1888). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsRed Lake Chippewa Indians of Minnesota . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 33287855. Caption title.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

3422.   . (1884). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota  . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31071133
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: Caption title. Report on bill to allot lands in severalty to Chippewas and dispose of the remaining reservation under the homestead and pre-emption laws.

3423.   . (1886). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsRed Lake Indian Reservation [Report on lands occupied by Chippewas in Minn., calling for a cession of land and allotment of lands in severalty] . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30788132. Other: Peel, S. W. (Samuel West), 1831- 1924.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

3424.   United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian Affairs. (1926). Reservation courts of Indian offenses. Hearings before the Committee on Indian affairs, House of representatives, Sixty-ninth Congress, first session, on H. R. 7826. February 13 to May 20, 1926. Washington: Govt. print. off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Scott Leavitt, chairman.

3425.   . (1926). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Indian AffairsReservation courts of Indian offenses hearings before the Committee on Indian Affairs, House of Representatives, Sixty-ninth Congress, first session, on H. R. 7826 . Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31029764. Scott Leavitt, chairman.

3426.   United States. Congress. House. Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. (1992). Indian Tribal Justice Act : hearing before the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, second session, on H.R. 4004 ... hearing held in Pierre, SD, February 7, 1992. Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27122393

3427.   . (1983). United States. Congress. House. Committee on Interior and Insular AffairsProviding for the use and distribution of funds awarded the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in docket numbered 15-72 of the U.S. Court of Claims : report (to accompany S. 884) (including the cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 10080490. Caption title. Distributed to some depository libraries in microfiche. "September 28, 1983." ... accession: 18799687.

3428.   United States. Congress. House. Committee on Private Land Claims. (1825). Indian grant to Captain Carver : communicated to the House of Representatives January 28, 1825 . American State Papers. Class VIII, Public Lands, 4(444), 82-84 .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 16438842. Title from caption. Other: Peters, Samuel, 1735-1826.

3429.   United States. Congress. House. Committee on Resources. (1997). Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Act report (to accompany H.R. 948) (including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). Washington, D.C.  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Caption title. "October 28, 1997." Microfiche. Washington, D.C. : U.S. G.P.O., 1998. 1 microfiche : negative.

3430.   . (1998). United States. Congress. House. Committee on ResourcesThe Swan Creek Black River Confederated Ojibwa Tribes hearing before the Committee on Resources, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, second session, on H.R. 2822 ... October 7, 1998, Washington, DC.  Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

3431.   . (1930). United States. Congress. House. Committee on the LibraryMonument at the "Old crossing" in Red Lake River Valley, Minnesota ... Report. (To accompany H.R. 5271) ...  Washington: U.S. Govt. print. off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19616471.  Submitted by Mr. Hooper. "Committed to the Committee of the whole House on the state of the Union and ordered to be printed", April 10, 1930.

3432.   United States. Congress. Senate. (1889). Chippewa Timber Contracts and Allotments of Land, Senate Report to Accompany Bills 2522, 2582 and 2583. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Title from caption. Running titles: Chippewa allotments of land [left page]; Chippewa timber contracts [right page] Includes synoptical index.

3433.   . (1938). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Foreign RelationsFlowage easement on certain Chippewa Indian lands bordering Lake of the Woods, Warroad River, and Rainy River, Minn. : report (to accompany H.R. 8432) . Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Caption title. "January 5 ... 1938."

3434.   United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs. (1938). Divide funds between Red Lake and all other Chippewa Indians of Minnesota. Hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Seventy-fifth Congress, third session, on H.R. 4544, an act to divide the funds of the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota between the Red Lake band and the remainder of the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota, organized as the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. March 7, 1938. Washington: U.S. Govt. print. off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21661391, accession: 23246172.  Running title: Divide funds of Chippewa Indians of Minnesota. Printed for the use of the Committee on Indian Affairs. Elmer Thomas, chairman.

3435.   . (1938). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsDivide funds between Red Lake and all other Chippewa Indians of Minnesota : report (to accompany H.R. 4544).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29482547

3436.   . (1933). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsPayment of $100 to each Chippewa Indian of Red Lake Band : report (to accompany S. 1561).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26709220

3437.   . (1935). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsPer capita payment of $15 to Red Lake Chippewa Indians, Minnesota : report (to accompany H.R. 4123) . Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27927636

3438.   . (1937). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsPer-capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 4539).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29785263

3439.   . (1939). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsPer capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 3248).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30707595

3440.   . (1940). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs Per capita payment to Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany H.R. 8369)  . Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31069426.  Caption title. "September 24 ... 1940."

3441.   . (1938). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian AffairsRed Lake Band Chippewa Indians, Minnesota jurisdictional bill : report (to accompany H.R. 4540).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29585184

3442.   United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs. (1928). Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indian[s] Hearings before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Seventieth Congress, first session, on S. 3032, a bill to confer additional jurisdiction upon the Court of Claims under an act entitled An act authorizing the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota to submit claims to the Court of Claims, approved May 14, 1926. February 21, 1928. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21722680, accession: 23246278

3443.   United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs (1993- ). (1999). Jurisdictional issues : hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, second session, on Jurisdictional issues involving Indian Tribes in the State of Montana and the nation, April 8, 1998, Billings, MT. Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 40942360

3444.   . (1996). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs (1993- )Tribal Justice Act : hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session, oversight hearing on Public Law 103-176, Indian Tribal Justice Act, August 2, 1995, Washington, DC.  Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 34502655

3445.   . (1964). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interior and Insular AffairsProviding for the disposition of judgment funds now on deposit to the credit of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians : report (to accompany S. 3035).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31498997

3446.   United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Subcommittee on Indian Affairs. (1975). Tribal judicial reform : hearing before the Subcommittee on Indian Affairs of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fourth Congress, first session, on the need for Indian law enforcement and judicial reform on Indian reservations, February 24, 1975. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

3447.   . (1975). United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. Subcommittee on Indian AffairsTribal judicial reform hearing before the Subcommittee on Indian Affairs of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-fourth Congress, first session, on the need for Indian law enforcement and judicial reform on Indian reservations.  Washington : U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31272555

3448.   United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty. (1966). Menominee County aid hearings before the Subcommittee on Employment and Manpower of the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, United States Senate, Eighty-ninth Congress, first and second sessions on S. 1934, a bill authorizing the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare to make certain grants to Menominee County, Wisconsin, and for other purposes. Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  "November 10 and 11, 1965, and February 17, 1966." Originally issued by the subcommittee under its earlier name: Subcommittee on Employment and Manpower.

3449.   . (1992). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsFederal court review of tribal courts rulings in actions arising under Indian Civil Rights Act : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, first session ... November 20, 1991, Washington, DC.  Washington: U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26198531

3450.   . (1983). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsProviding for the use and distribution of funds awarded the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in docket numbered 15-72 of the U.S. Court of Claims : report (to accompany S. 884).  Washington, D.C.?  U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 9654698, 11594242.  Caption title. "May 5 ... 1983."

3451.   . (1985). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsS. 1349-S. 1398 : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-ninth Congress, first session, on S. 1349 ... July 17, 1985, Washington, DC . Washington: U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12904089

3452.   . (1988). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsTribal court systems and Indian Civil Rights Act : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, second session ... January 22, 1988, Washington, DC.  Washington: U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office, U.S. G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18423824

3453.   . (1991). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsTribal Courts Act of 1991 and report of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights entitled "Indian Civil Rights Act" : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, first session ... to provide support for and assist the development of tribal judicial systems and the implementation of the Indian Civl Rights Act by Indian tribal governments, September 10, 1991, Washington, DC.  Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27337894

3454.   . (1992). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsTribal Courts Act of 1991 : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, second session, on proposed substitute bill to S. 1752, the Indian Tribal Courts Act of 1991, April 7, 1991, Washington, DC . Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27033014

3455.   . (1991). United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Indian AffairsTribal Judicial Enhancement Act : hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, first session on S. 667 to provide support for and assist the development of tribal judicial systems, June 5, 1991, Washington, DC.  Washington: U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25120643.  Includes bibliographical references.

3456.   United States. Department of Commerce. National Telecommunications and Information Administration. (1999). Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (PTFP); Notices. Federal Register, 64(78), 20065-20087.
Abstract: File No. 99178CRB, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Public Broadcasting Corporation, 13386 W. Trepania Road Hayward, WI 54843. Contact: Ms. Camille Lacapa, Program Director, (715) 634-2100. Funds Requested: $99,881. Total Project Cost: $199,762. To improve public radio station WOJB-FM, 88.9 MHz in Hayward, WI, by replacing the damaged 16-year-old transmitter and purchasing test equipment. The project will also replace studio equipment with new DAT machines, CD players, a stereo generator, microphones, amplifiers and speakers. The station serves a population of 129,000 people.

3457.   United States. Department of Energy.  100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 246, Bytes: 1381

3458.   United States. Department of Energy.  An aerial radiological survey of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area. Final report, October 19, 1996--October 24, 1996 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports] Score: 217, Bytes: 2621

3459.   United States. Department of Energy.  An aerial radiological survey of the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 217, Bytes: 2593

3460.   United States. Department of Energy.  American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 350, Bytes: 3008

3461.   United States. Department of Energy.  Appendix G: American Indian comments for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Impact Statement .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 641, Bytes: 2352

3462.   United States. Department of Energy.  Blue Creek Winter Range: Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final environmental assessment .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 613, Bytes: 2502

3463.   United States. Department of Energy.  Changes in bird community composition in response to growth changes in short-rotation woody crop plantings .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]       Score: 371, Bytes: 2657

3464.   United States. Department of Energy.  College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 789, Bytes: 3163

3465.   United States. Department of Energy.  Compare harvest systems. Minnesota Agripower Project, Task II research report .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 341, Bytes: 1506

3466.   United States. Department of Energy.  Cooperative fish-rearing programs in Hanford Site excess facilities .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]    Score: 246, Bytes: 1749

3467.   United States. Department of Energy.  Decision-aids for enhancing intergovernmental interactions: The Pre- notification Analysis Support System (PASS) .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 338, Bytes: 2699

3468.   United States. Department of Energy.  Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and off- site locations in the State of Nevada. Volume 1, Appendix G: American Indian comments for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Impact Statement .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 733, Bytes: 2352

3469.   United States. Department of Energy.  Electric industry restructuring and environmental issues: A comparative analysis of the experience in California, New York, and Wisconsin .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 427, Bytes: 2696

3470.   United States. Department of Energy.  Environmental implications associated with integrated resource planning by public utilities in the western United States .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports] Score: 214, Bytes: 1894

3471.   United States. Department of Energy.  Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 769, Bytes: 3300

3472.   United States. Department of Energy.  Financial assistance to States and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 332, Bytes: 2344

3473.   United States. Department of Energy.  Fisheries habitat evaluation in tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Annual report, 1992 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 705, Bytes: 2796

3474.   United States. Department of Energy.  Great explorations: Children, seasons and cycles .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 491, Bytes: 1557

3475.   United States. Department of Energy.  Indian Summer .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]    Score: 840, Bytes: 2660

3476.   United States. Department of Energy.  Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 505, Bytes: 2033

3477.   United States. Department of Energy.  Large-scale biomass plantings in Minnesota: Scale-up and demonstration projects in perspective .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 459, Bytes: 2863

3478.   United States. Department of Energy.  Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States: An overview of current commercial regulations and concepts .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 241, Bytes: 2218

3479.   United States. Department of Energy.  Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project; Final environmental assessment .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 649, Bytes: 2289

3480.   United States. Department of Energy.  Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project; Final performance report, February 7, 1989--December 31, 1993 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 217, Bytes: 2762

3481.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota agri-power project. Quarterly report, January--March 1997 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]       Score: 420, Bytes: 1671

3482.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota Agri-Power Project. Quarterly report, January--March, 1998 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 479, Bytes: 2119

3483.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota Agri Power Project. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 320, Bytes: 2208

3484.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota AGRI-Power Project. Task V - community education. Community education. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 518, Bytes: 1734

3485.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota Agripower Project. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 342, Bytes: 1475

3486.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, April--June 1997 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 543, Bytes: 2481

3487.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota Agripower Project. Quarterly report, July 1996--September 1996 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]       Score: 337, Bytes: 1723

3488.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, October--December 1996 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]       Score: 423, Bytes: 1497

3489.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota Agripower Project, Task IV research report .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 426, Bytes: 1551

3490.   United States. Department of Energy.  Minnesota wood energy scale-up project 1994 establishment cost data .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 1000, Bytes: 3316

3491.   United States. Department of Energy.  Partnership for Environmental Technology Education: Tribal Colleges Initiative in Science and Environmental Education .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]    Score: 247, Bytes: 2061

3492.   United States. Department of Energy.  Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 617, Bytes: 1960

3493.   United States. Department of Energy.  [Pre-freshman enrichment program]. Past accomplishments and results from prior DOE and NSF support .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 277, Bytes: 2999

3494.   United States. Department of Energy.  Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 306, Bytes: 2441

3495.   United States. Department of Energy.  Proposed Amendment to Presidential Permit PP-63 and Associated Modifications to 500-kV International Transmission Line: Forbes, Minnesota to Manitoba, Canada, Northern States Power Company; Addendum to the final Environmental Assessment .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 505, Bytes: 2057

3496.   United States. Department of Energy.  Renewable energy in Indian country .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]

3497.   United States. Department of Energy.  Renewable energy in Indian country .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 1000, Bytes: 2710

3498.   United States. Department of Energy.  SKILL PREP Program for American Indian Students. Final report, 1994 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 560, Bytes: 1981

3499.   United States. Department of Energy.  State heating oil and propane program: Final technical report, 1991-92 heating season, Minnesota Department of Public Service .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 536, Bytes: 1763

3500.   United States. Department of Energy.  Time-series analysis for the episodic production and transport of methane from the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands, northern Minnesota. Final report .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 472, Bytes: 2980

3501.   United States. Department of Energy.  Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998 .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 250, Bytes: 1748

3502.   United States. Department of Energy.  University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 445, Bytes: 3251

3503.   United States. Department of Energy.   US hydropower resource assessment for Wisconsin .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 439, Bytes: 1948

3504.   United States. Department of Energy.  Watershed management program. Draft environmental impact statement  .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]     Score: 240, Bytes: 2285

3505.   United States. Department of Energy.  Yields of ten and eleven year-old hybrid poplars in the north central United States. Final report .
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 339, Bytes: 1765

3506.   United States. Department of Energy, & Conrad, D. (1993). CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report.
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 255, Bytes: 1618

3507.   United States. Department of Energy, & Gopher, D. (1994). CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report.
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 328, Bytes: 2425

3508.   United States. Department of Energy, & Perez, M. (1994). CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report.
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]      Score: 238, Bytes: 2428

3509.   United States. Department of Energy, & Steele, M. (1995). CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report.
Notes: Source: DOE Reports Bibliographic Database [electronic database, Fall 1999 search DOE Reports]   Score: 253, Bytes: 1708

3510.   United States. Department of Energy. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. (1999). Notice of Recreation Plan Amendment and Soliciting Comments, Motions to Intervene, and Protests, April 5, 1999. Federal Register, 64(68), 17361-17362.
Abstract: Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and is available for public inspection: a. Application Type: Amendment of Recreation Plan. b. Project No.: 2113-106. c. Date Filed: March 11,1999. d. Applicant: Wisconsin Valley Improvement Company. e. Name of Project: Wisconsin Valley Project. f. Location: This amendment will affect project lands on the shore of Rice Lake, in Oneida and Lincoln Counties, Wisconsin. The project utilizes U.S. Forest Service lands within the Nicolet and Ottawa National Forests, and lands of the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Chippewa Indians. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-825(r). h. Applicant Contact: Mr. Robert W. Gall, Wisconsin Valley Improvement Company, 2301 N. Third Street, Wausau, WI 54403, (715) 848- 2976. i. FERC Contact: Any questions on this notice should be addressed to Patti Pakkala, by e-mail at patti.pakkala@ferc.fed.us, or telephone at (202) 219-0025. j. Deadline for filing comments and or motions: May 13, 1999. All documents (original and eight copies) should be filed with: David P. Boergers, Secretary, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Mail Code: DLC HL-11.1, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426.
[[Page 17362]]
 Please include the project number (2113-106) on any comments or motions filed.

3511.   United States. Department of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (1999). Comprehensive Program Plan for Fiscal Year 1999; Notice. Federal Register:  64(131), 37273-37293.
Notes: Source: the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr09jy99-111]
Abstract: SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is publishing its Final Program Plan for fiscal year (FY) 1999.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eileen M. Garry, Director, Information Dissemination Unit, at 202-307-5911. 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is a component of the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 204(b)(5)(A) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq. (JJDP Act), the Administrator of OJJDP published for public comment a Proposed Comprehensive Plan describing the program activities that OJJDP proposed to carry out during Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The Proposed Comprehensive Plan included activities authorized in Parts C and D of Title II of the JJDP Act, codified at 42 U.S.C. 5651-5665a, 5667, 5667a. The public was invited to comment on the Proposed Plan by March 18, 1999. The Administrator analyzed the public comments received, and the comments and OJJDP's responses are provided below. The Administrator took these comments into consideration in developing this Final Comprehensive Plan describing the particular program activities that OJJDP intends to fund during FY 1999, using in whole or in part funds appropriated under Parts C and D of Title II of the JJDP Act. Notice of the official solicitation of grant or cooperative agreement applications for competitive programs to be funded under the Final Comprehensive Plan will be published at a later date in the Federal Register. No proposals, concept papers, or other forms of application should be submitted at this time.
Overview
 After a steady climb in the rates of juvenile violent crime arrests, resulting in an increase of 60 percent between 1988 and 1994, the Nation experienced a substantial, 23 percent decline in the 3 years between 1994 and 1997. More notable were the trends in the juvenile arrest rate for murder, which, after doubling between 1987 and 1993, dropped by more than 40 percent between 1993 and 1997. In addition, in the discussion of trends, it is important to note that in any given year less than \1/2\ of 1 percent of this country's juveniles ages 10 to 17 are arrested for violent crime. Even though rates have been dropping, however, they are still more than 20 percent higher than the average rate of the years between 1980 and 1988. The serious concerns engendered by the increase in violent juvenile crime in the 1980's led many States to enact legislation to address the changing nature of juvenile delinquency and to use a more accountability-based approach in dealing with serious violent juvenile offenders. At the same time, a national dialog began over how best to reform the juvenile justice system to make it more effective in preventing and intervening with juvenile delinquency and victimization and in protecting the public. In order to see this become a reality, the positive achievements of recent years should lead not to complacency, but to a renewed commitment to continue to pursue the research-based, comprehensive approach to problems of delinquency, violence, and victimization that OJJDP inaugurated with the publication in December 1993 of its Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent, and Chronic Juvenile Offenders. It is encouraging that in recent years communities have begun to take on this work and make the commitment needed to make a comprehensive strategy a reality. More and more communities are coming to the understanding that a long-term, consistent commitment will be required to reduce juvenile delinquency, violence, and victimization and to ensure public safety. This Final Comprehensive Plan describes OJJDP's plans for funding activities authorized under Part C (National Programs) and Part D (Gang-Free Schools and Communities; Community-Based Gang Intervention) of Title II of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. The activities authorized under Parts C and D make up part of OJJDP's overall responsibilities under the JJDP Act. These responsibilities are outlined briefly below. In 1974, the JJDP Act established OJJDP as the Federal agency responsible for providing national leadership, coordination, and resources to develop and implement effective methods to prevent and reduce juvenile delinquency and improve the quality of juvenile justice in the United States. OJJDP administers State Formula Grants under Part B of Title II, State Challenge Grants under Part E of Title II, and Community Prevention Grants under Title V of the JJDP Act to assist States and territories to fund a range of delinquency prevention, control, and juvenile justice system improvement activities. OJJDP provides support activities for these and other programs under statutory set-asides that are used to provide related research, evaluation, statistics, demonstration, and training and technical assistance services. OJJDP also funds Special Emphasis programs authorized under Part C; school and community-based gang prevention, intervention, and suppression programs under Part D; and mentoring programs under Part G of Title II of the JJDP Act; funds numerous research, evaluation, statistics, demonstration, training and technical assistance, and information dissemination activities through its National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; administers the Drug Prevention Program, the Underage Drinking Program, the Safe Schools Initiative, a Native American discretionary grants program, the Safe Start: Children Exposed to Violence Initiative, and the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grants program. OJJDP also coordinates Federal activities related to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention. OJJDP serves as the staff agency for the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, coordinates the Concentration of Federal Efforts Program, and administers both the Title IV Missing and Exploited Children's Program and programs under the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 13001 et seq. OJJDP focuses its assistance on the development and implementation of programs with the greatest potential for reducing juvenile delinquency and improving the juvenile justice system by establishing partnerships with State and local governments, American Indian and Alaska Native jurisdictions, and public and private agencies and organizations. OJJDP performs its role of national leadership in juvenile justice and delinquency prevention through a cycle of activities. These include
[[Page 37275]]
collecting data and statistics to determine the extent and nature of issues affecting juveniles; funding research that can lead to demonstrations funded by discretionary grants; evaluating demonstration projects; sharing lessons learned from the field with practitioners through a range of information dissemination vehicles; providing seed money to States through formula and block grants to implement projects or reform efforts; and providing training and technical assistance to assist States and local governments to implement programs effectively and to maintain the integrity of model programs as they are being replicated. It is important to note that OJJDP emphasizes coordination with other Office of Justice Program (OJP) components and other Federal agencies whenever possible to concentrate Federal resources to achieve maximum results from its programs and initiatives. This coordination, which is evidenced in many of the program descriptions that follow, includes joint funding, interagency agreements, and partnerships to develop, implement, and evaluate projects. More important, it is critical that the reader become familiar with the program activities of the other OJP Bureaus and Offices as reflected in the Office of Justice Programs Fiscal Year 1999 Program Plan. The work undertaken in OJP in many instances cuts across components and areas of practice; therefore, the work undertaken by OJJDP should be viewed as part of a larger OJP composite. Considering all the factors discussed above, OJJDP has prepared this Final Comprehensive Plan for FY 1999 for activities authorized under Part C (National Programs) and Part D (Gang-Free Schools and Communities; Community-Based Gang Intervention) of Title II of the JJDP Act, as described in the following pages. ...
Technical Assistance to Juvenile Corrections and Detention (The James E. Gould Memorial Program)
 The primary purpose of this program is to provide specialized technical assistance to juvenile corrections, detention, and community residential service providers. The grantee also plans and convenes an annual Juvenile Corrections and Detention Forum, which provides an opportunity for juvenile corrections and detention leaders to meet and discuss issues, problems, and solutions to emerging corrections and detention problems. The grantee also provides workshops and conferences on current and emerging national issues in the field of juvenile corrections and detention, conducts surveys, and offers technical assistance through document dissemination. OJJDP will continue this program, which began in FY 1995 under competitive grant for a 3-year period. The project will be implemented by the current grantee, the American Correctional Association. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999.
Technical Assistance to Native Americans
 The goal of this program is to build the capacity of the Gila River Indian community, the Pueblo of Jemez, the Navajo Nation, the Red Band of Chippewa Indians, other Native American and Alaskan Native communities, and urban jurisdictions where tribal people reside to address Indian youth crime, delinquency, violence and victimization. Project funds support the development of comprehensive, systemwide responses to these problems in tribal communities. In FY 1999, OJJDP will continue to provide technical assistance to Native Americans to enable tribes to further develop alternatives to detention, specifically targeting juveniles who are first or nonviolent offenders; design guidebooks for the tribal peacemaking process to be used in addressing juvenile delinquency issues that are reported to Family District Court systems; design and implement juvenile justice needs assessments to assist tribes in responding to juvenile detention and alternatives to detention needs; develop protocols to implement State Children's Code provisions that affect Native American Children; and establish sustainable, comprehensive community-based planning processes that focus on the needs of tribal youth. In FY 1997, American Indian Development Associates (AIDA) was selected to implement OJJDP's national technical assistance program for tribes and urban tribal programs across the country for a 3-year period. This program will be implemented by the current grantee, the American Indian Development Associates. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999. ...
Safe Kids/Safe Streets: Community Approaches to Reducing Abuse and Neglect and Preventing Delinquency
 This 5\1/2\ year demonstration program is designed to foster coordinated community responses to child abuse and neglect. Several components of the Office of Justice Programs joined in FY 1996 to develop this coordinated program response to break the cycle of early childhood victimization and later criminality and to reduce child abuse and neglect and resulting child fatalities. OJJDP awarded competitive cooperative agreements in FY 1997 to five sites (National Children's Advocacy Center, Huntsville, Alabama; the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Heart of America United Way, Kansas City, Missouri; Toledo Hospital Children's Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio; and the Community Network for Children, Youth and Family Services, Chittenden County, Vermont). Funds were provided by OJJDP, the Executive Office for Weed and Seed, and the Violence Against Women Grants Office. In FY 1999, continuation awards will be made to each of the current demonstration sites. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999.
 Dated: June 29, 1999. Shay Bilchik, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. [FR Doc. 99-17390 Filed 7-8-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410-18-P

3512.   United States. Department of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OJP (OJJDP)-1204]. (1999). Proposed Comprehensive Plan for Fiscal Year 1999; Notice. Federal Register, 64(20), 4939-4955.
Abstract: SUMMARY: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is publishing this notice of its Proposed Comprehensive Plan for fiscal year (FY) 1999.
DATES: Comments must be received on or before March 18, 1999.
ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed to Shay Bilchik, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 800 K Street, NW., Third Floor, Washington, DC 20531.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eileen M. Garry, Director, Information Dissemination Unit, at 202-307-5911. ...
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is a component of the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 204(b)(5)(A) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 5601 et seq. (JJDP Act), the Administrator of OJJDP is publishing for public comment a Proposed Comprehensive Plan describing the program activities that OJJDP proposes to carry out during Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The Proposed Comprehensive Plan includes activities authorized in Parts C and D of Title II of the JJDP Act, codified at 42 U.S.C. 5651-5665a, 5667, 5667a. Taking into consideration comments received on this Proposed Comprehensive Plan, the Administrator will develop and publish a Final Comprehensive Plan describing the particular program activities that OJJDP intends to fund during FY 1999, using in whole or in part funds appropriated under Parts C and D of Title II of the JJDP Act. Notice of the official solicitation of grant or cooperative agreement applications for competitive programs to be funded under the Final Comprehensive Plan will be published at a later date in the Federal Register. No proposals, concept papers, or other forms of application should be submitted at this time.
... OVERVIEW
 After a steady climb in the rates of juvenile violent crime arrests, resulting in an increase of 60 percent between 1988 and 1994, the Nation experienced a substantial, 23 percent, decline in the 3 years between 1994 and 1997. More notable were the trends in the juvenile arrest rate for murder, which, after doubling between 1987 and 1993, dropped by more than 40 percent between 1993 and 1997. In addition, in the discussion of trends, it is important to note that in any given year less than \1/2\ of 1 percent of this country's juveniles ages 10 to 17 are arrested for violent crime. Even though rates have been dropping, however, they are still more than 20 percent higher than the average rate of the years between 1980 and 1988. The serious concerns engendered by the increase in violent juvenile crime in the 1980's led many States to enact legislation to address the changing nature of juvenile delinquency and to use a more accountability-based approach in dealing with serious violent juvenile offenders. At the same time, a national dialog began over how best to reform the juvenile justice system to make it more effective in preventing and intervening with juvenile delinquency and victimization and in protecting the public. In order to see this become a reality, the positive achievements of recent years should lead not to complacency, but to a renewed commitment to continue to pursue the research-based, comprehensive approach to problems of delinquency, violence, and victimization that OJJDP inaugurated with the publication in December 1993 of its Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent, and Chronic Juvenile Offenders. It is encouraging that in recent years communities have begun to take on this work and make the commitment needed to make a comprehensive strategy a reality. More and more communities are coming to the understanding that a long-term, consistent commitment will be required to reduce juvenile delinquency, violence, and victimization and to ensure public safety. This Proposed Comprehensive Plan describes OJJDP's plans for funding activities authorized under Part C (National Programs) and Part D (Gang-Free Schools and Communities; Community-Based Gang Intervention) of Title II of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act. The activities authorized under Parts C and D make up part of OJJDP's overall responsibilities under the JJDP Act. These responsibilities are outlined briefly below. In 1974, the JJDP Act established OJJDP as the Federal agency responsible for providing national leadership, coordination, and resources to develop and implement effective methods to prevent and reduce juvenile delinquency and improve the quality of juvenile justice in the United States. OJJDP administers State Formula Grants under Part B of Title II, State Challenge Grants under Part E of Title II, and Community Prevention Grants under Title V of the JJDP Act to assist States and territories to fund a range of delinquency prevention, control, and juvenile justice system improvement activities. OJJDP provides support activities for these and other programs under statutory set-asides that are used to provide related research, evaluation, statistics, demonstration, and training and technical assistance services. OJJDP also funds Special Emphasis programs authorized under Part C; school and community-based gang prevention, intervention, and suppression programs under Part D; and mentoring programs under Part G of Title II of the JJDP Act; funds numerous research, evaluation, statistics, demonstration, training and technical assistance, and information dissemination activities through its National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; administers the Drug Prevention Program, the Underage Drinking Program, the Safe Schools Initiative, a Native American discretionary grants program, the Safe Start: Children Exposed to Violence Initiative, and the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grants program. OJJDP also coordinates Federal activities related to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention. OJJDP serves as the staff agency for the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, coordinates the Concentration of Federal Efforts Program, and administers both the Title IV Missing and Exploited Children's Program and programs under the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 13001 et seq. OJJDP focuses its assistance on the development and implementation of programs with the greatest potential for reducing juvenile delinquency and improving the juvenile justice system by establishing partnerships with State and local governments, American Indian and Alaska Native jurisdictions, and public and private agencies and organizations. OJJDP performs its role of national leadership in juvenile justice and delinquency prevention through a cycle of activities. These include
[[Page 4941]]
collecting data and statistics to determine the extent and nature of issues affecting juveniles; funding research that can lead to demonstrations funded by discretionary grants; evaluating demonstration projects; sharing lessons learned from the field with practitioners through a range of information dissemination vehicles; providing seed money to States through formula and block grants to implement projects or reform efforts; and providing training and technical assistance to assist States and local governments to implement programs effectively and to maintain the integrity of model programs as they are being replicated. It is important to note that OJJDP emphasizes coordination with other Office of Justice Program (OJP) components and other Federal agencies whenever possible to concentrate Federal resources to achieve maximum results from its programs and initiatives. This coordination, which is evidenced in many of the program descriptions that follow, includes joint funding, interagency agreements, and partnerships to develop, implement, and evaluate projects. More important, it is critical that the reader become familiar with the program activities of the other OJP Bureaus and Offices as reflected in the Office of Justice Programs Fiscal Year 1999 Program Plan. The work undertaken in OJP in many instances cuts across components and areas of practice; therefore, the work undertaken by OJJDP should be viewed as part of a larger OJP composite. Considering all the factors discussed above, OJJDP has prepared this Proposed Comprehensive Plan for FY 1999 for activities authorized under Part C (National Programs) and Part D (Gang-Free Schools and Communities; Community-Based Gang Intervention) of Title II of the JJDP Act, as described in the following pages. ...
Technical Assistance to Juvenile Corrections and Detention (The James E. Gould Memorial Program)
 The primary purpose of this program is to provide specialized technical assistance to juvenile corrections, detention, and community residential service providers. The grantee also plans and convenes an annual Juvenile Corrections and Detention Forum, which provides an opportunity for juvenile corrections and detention leaders to meet and discuss issues, problems, and solutions to emerging corrections and detention problems. The grantee also provides workshops and conferences on current and emerging national issues in the field of juvenile corrections and detention, conducts surveys, and offers technical assistance through document dissemination. OJJDP proposes to continue this program, which began in FY 1995 under competitive grant for a 3- year period. The project would be implemented by the current grantee, the American Correctional Association. No additional applications would be solicited in FY 1999.
Technical Assistance to Native Americans
 The goal of this program is to build the capacity of the Gila River Indian community, the Pueblo of Jemez, the Navajo Nation, the Red Band of Chippewa Indians, other Native American and Alaskan Native communities, and urban jurisdictions where tribal people reside to address Indian youth crime, delinquency, violence and victimization. Project funds support the development of comprehensive, systemwide responses to these problems in tribal communities. In FY 1999, OJJDP will continue to provide technical assistance to Native Americans to enable tribes to further develop alternatives to detention, specifically targeting juveniles who are first or nonviolent offenders; design guidebooks for the tribal peacemaking process to be used in addressing juvenile delinquency issues that are
[[Page 4955]]
reported to Family District Court systems; design and implement juvenile justice needs assessments to assist tribes in responding to juvenile detention and alternatives to detention needs; develop protocols to implement State Children's Code provisions that affect Native American Children; and establish sustainable, comprehensive community-based planning processes that focus on the needs of tribal youth. In FY 1997, American Indian Development Associates (AIDA) was selected to implement OJJDP's national technical assistance program for tribes and urban tribal programs across the country for a 3-year period. This program will be implemented by the current grantee, the American Indian Development Associates. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999. ...
Child Abuse and Neglect and Dependency Courts
National Evaluation of the Safe Kids/Safe Streets Program
 OJJDP will continue funding the grant competitively awarded in FY 1997 to Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD, for a national evaluation to document and explicate the process of community mobilization, planning, and collaboration that has taken place before and during the Safe Kids/ Safe Streets awards; to inform program staff of performance levels on an ongoing basis; and to determine the effectiveness of the implemented programs in achieving the goals of the Safe Kids/Safe Streets program. The initial 18-month grant began a process evaluation and determined the feasibility of an impact evaluation. This evaluation will be implemented by the current grantee, Westat, Inc. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999.
Safe Kids/Safe Streets: Community Approaches to Reducing Abuse and Neglect and Preventing Delinquency
 This 5\1/2\ year demonstration program is designed to foster coordinated community responses to child abuse and neglect. Several components of the Office of Justice Programs joined in FY 1996 to develop this coordinated program response to break the cycle of early childhood victimization and later criminality and to reduce child abuse and neglect and resulting child fatalities. OJJDP awarded competitive cooperative agreements in FY 1997 to five sites (National Children's Advocacy Center, Huntsville, Alabama; the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Heart of America United Way, Kansas City, Missouri; Toledo Hospital Children's Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio; and the Community Network for Children, Youth and Family Services, Chittenden County, Vermont). Funds were provided by OJJDP, the Executive Office for Weed and Seed, and the Violence Against Women Grants Office. In FY 1999, continuation awards will be made to each of the current demonstration sites. No additional applications will be solicited in FY 1999.
 Dated: January 27, 1999. Shay Bilchik, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. [FR Doc. 99-2326 Filed 1-29-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410-18-P

3513.   United States. Department of the Interior. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1999). 25 CFR Part 170: Notice of the Proposed Membership of the Negotiated Rulemaking Committee Under Section 1115 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). Federal Register, 64(28), 6825-6827.
Notes: Source: the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr11fe99-27]
Abstract: SUMMARY: As required by the Negotiated Rulemaking Act, the Secretary of the Interior has selected the proposed member of a committee to develop proposed rules for the Indian Reservation Roads program. Tribes in each of the twelve Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Areas were invited to nominate two representatives and two alternates to serve on the committee. After considering nominations, the Secretary proposes to appoint the persons named in this notice as committee members. Tribes, tribal organizations, and individual tribal members who believe that their interests will not be adequately represented by the persons identified in this notice may submit comments on the proposed selection, apply for membership on the committee, or submit other nominations.
DATES: Comments on the proposed committee membership to this negotiated rulemaking committee must be received no later than March 13, 1999.
ADDRESSES: Send nominations and comments to Mr. LeRoy Gishi, Chief, Division of Transportation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior, MS-4058-MIB, 1849 C Street NW, Washington, DC 20240. Nominations and comments received by the BIA will be available for inspection at the address listed above from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. LeRoy Gishi, Chief, Division of Transportation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, at the address listed above, or by telephone at (202) 208-4359 or fax at (202) 208-4696. Additional information may be posted on the Indian Reservation Roads web site at www.irr.bia.gov, as it becomes available.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: As required by 23 U.S.C. section 202, as amended by TEA-21, the Secretary shall, pursuant to a negotiated rulemaking process, issue regulations governing the Indian Reservation Roads program and establish a formula for allocating all contractible funds among Indian tribes for fiscal year 2000 and subsequent years. Section 202 also requires that in establishing this committee, the Secretary will (1) apply the procedures of negotiated rulemaking under subchapter III of chapter 5 of title 5 (the Negotiated Rulemaking Act) in a manner that reflects the unique government-to-government relationship between the Indian tribes and the United States, and (2) ensure that the membership of the committee includes only representatives of the Federal Government and of geographically diverse small, medium, and large Indian tribes. In negotiating a proposed regulation establishing a funding formula, the committee will base its proposal on factors that reflect (a) the relative needs of the Indian tribes, and reservation or tribal communities, for transportation assistance, and (b) the relative administrative capacities of, and challenges faced by, various Indian tribes, including the cost of road construction in each BIA Area, geographic isolation and difficulty in maintaining all-weather access to employment, commerce, health, safety, and educational resources. Also, the committee will develop a regulation governing the Indian Reservation Roads program. The Secretary invites organizations and individuals to comment on the nominations in this notice or nominate other persons for membership on the committee. The Secretary intends that the proposed committee (including any additional members selected) reflect balanced interests as follows: (1) Members of geographically diverse small, medium, and large Indian tribes; (2) Members of tribes identified as Direct Service, Self- Determination and Self-Governance tribes; and (3) Members of tribes with various levels and types of experience in the diverse concerns of transportation development and management (e.g., jurisdictional issues, complexity of transportation systems, climatic concerns, environmental issues, geographic isolation, etc.). The Secretary has determined that the proper functioning of the committee requires more than the 25 members recommended by the Negotiated Rulemaking Act (5 U.S.C. 565) in order to achieve balanced representation from geographically diverse small, medium, and large Indian tribes as required by Section 1115 of TEA-21. The Secretary has selected 29 tribal representatives and 13 Federal representatives for the committee, for a proposed total of 42 members. The first meeting of the committee is tentatively scheduled for March 16-18, 1999. The following membership for the committee is proposed:
Federal Representatives
Robert Baracker, Designated Federal Official, BIA Albuquerque Area Office LeRoy Gishi, Chief, BIA Division of Transportation Justin P. Patterson, Assistant Solicitor, Office of the Solicitor (One representative), BIA Juneau Area Office Cordell Ringel, Area Road Engineer, BIA Billings Area Office Wilfred Frazier, Area Road Engineer, BIA Navajo Area Office Vernon Palmer, Area Road Engineer, BIA Phoenix Area Office Robert Ecoffy, Superintendent, Pine Ridge Agency, BIA Aberdeen Area Office Joel Smith, Superintendent, Minnesota Agency, BIA Minneapolis Area Office Mike Smith, Assistant Area Director, BIA Sacramento Area Office (Three representatives) Department of Transportation
Representatives of Tribes, Tribal Organizations, and Individual Indians
ABERDEEN AREA Pete Red Tomahawk, Transportation Planner Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Fort Yates, ND Ted Danks, Transportation Planner Three Affiliated Tribes of Mandan, Arikara and Hidatsa New Town, ND
[[Page 6826]]
Alternates: Fern Peltier, Transportation Planner Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Belcourt, ND Diane Zephier, Transportation Planner Oglala Sioux Tribe Pine Ridge, SD ALBUQUERQUE AREA Edward Little, Director, Indian Pueblos Federal Development Corp. All Indian Pueblo Council Albuquerque, NM James Mark Wright, Tribal Roads Engineer Jicarilla Apache Tribe Dulce, NM David Wyaco, Sr, Tribal Council Pueblo of Zuni Zuni, NM Alternates: Delfino Calabaza, AIPC Program Administrator Pueblo of Santo Domingo Santo Domingo Pueblo, NM Robert Goffinett, Tribal Transportation Director Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Towaoc, CO ANADARKO AREA Chuck Tsoodle, Tribal Roads & Transit Director Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma Carnegie, OK Tim Ramirez, Tribal Roads Director Prairie Band of Potawatami Nation Mayetta, KS Alternates: Bill Tall Bear, Program Coordinator-Transportation Planner Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma Concho, OK John Barrett, Chairman Citizen Potawatomi Nation Shawnee, OK BILLINGS AREA John Smith, Transportation Planner Shoshone & Arapaho Tribes Fort Washakie, WY Norma Gorneau, Vice Chair Northern Cheyenne Tribe Lame Deer, MT Alternates: John Healy, Transportation Planner Fort Belknap Tribes Harlem, MT Caleb Shields, Tribal Council Ft. Peck Tribe Poplar, MT EASTERN AREA Eddie Tullis, Tribal Chairman Poarch Band of Creek Indians Atmore, AL Jody Clark, Transportation Manager Seneca Nation of Indians Salamanca, NY Alternates: Johnson Owle, Transportation Planner Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Cherokee, NC Clifford Francis, Tribal Council Pleasant Point Passamaquoddy Perry, ME JUNEAU AREA Loretta Bullard, President Kawarek, INC. Nome, AK Al Ketzler Sr., Chief Administrative Officer Tanana Chiefs Conference Fairbanks, AK Gideon James, Tribal Operations Director Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government Venetie, AK Alternates: Dugan Nielsen, Director, Land & Resources Bristol Bay Native Association Dillingham, AK Edward Thomas, President Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Juneau, AK MINNEAPOLIS AREA Jim Garrigan, Director of Tribal Roads Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians Red Lake, MN Mike Christensen, Tribal Roads Committee Lac Du Flambeau Chippewa Lac du Flambeau, WI Alternates: Bruce Danforth, Public Works Area Manager Oneida Nation Oneida, WI John Stewart, Tribal Engineer Prairie Island Indian Community Welch, MN MUSKOGEE AREA George Almerigi, Second Chief Muskogee Creek Nation Okmulgee, OK Everett Waller, Councilman Osage Nation Pawhuska, OK Alternates: Robert Endicott, Transportation Planner Cherokee Nation Tahlequah, OK Rebecca Torres, Chief Alabama Quassarate Tribal Town Henryetta, OK NAVAJO AREA Sampson Begay, Tribal Council Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ Andrew Simpson, Tribal Council Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ Alternates: Alfred Yazzie, Navajo Nation Council Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ Thomas Christie, Department of Justice Navajo Nation Window Rock, AZ PHOENIX AREA Alex Cabello, Councilman Hualapai Tribe Peach Springs, AZ Robyn Burdette, Chairperson Summit Lake Paiute Tribe Winnemucca, NV Wade Large, Asst. Economic Development Director Uintah & Ouray Ute Tribe Fort Duchesne, UT Alternates: Cecil Antone, Lieutenant Governor Gila River Indian Community Sacaton, AZ Rita Martinez, Councilwoman Tohono O ``odham Nation Sells, AZ PORTLAND AREA Michael Marchand, Colville Business Council Confederated Tribes of Colville Indians Nespelem, WA Dave Whitener, Chairman Squaxin Island Tribe Shelton, WA Della Cree, Community Development Planner Nez Perce Tribe Lapwai, ID Alternates: Andy Kampkoff, Construction Manager Lummi Indian Business Council Bellingham, WA Mike Clement, Economic Development Manager Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Warm Springs, OR SACRAMENTO AREA Anthony Largo, Spokesman Santa Rosa Indian Reservation Hemet, CA Mervin Hess, Chairperson Bishop Indian Reservation Bishop, CA Vlayn McCovey, Council Member Yurok Tribe Eureka, CA Alternates: Mac Hayward, Public Works Director Redding Rancheria Redding, CA Randolph Feliz, Tribal Vice Chair Hopland Band of Pomo Indians Hopland, CA
 If you believe that your interests will not be adequately represented by any person identified in the committee membership, you may apply or nominate another person for membership on the committee. Each application or nomination must include: (1) The name of the nominee. (2) The tribal interest(s) to be represented by the nominee (based on the interests listed above). (3) Evidence that the applicant or nominee is authorized to represent
[[Page 6827]]
parties related to the interest(s) the person proposed to represent. (4) The reasons that the proposed members of the committee identified in this notice do not represent the interests of the person submitting the application or nomination. (5) Your name, address, telephone number, and the name of the tribe or tribal organization with which you are affiliated. To be considered, comments and nominations must be received by the close of business on March 13, 1999, at the location indicated in the ``Addresses'' section.
 Dated: February 4, 1999. Kevin Gover, Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs. [FR Doc. 99-3301 Filed 2-10-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-02-P

3514.   United States. Department of the Interior. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (Indian Census, White Earth Agency. Records of the Bureau of Indian Afairs. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3515.   United States. Department of the Interior.  Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1999). Indian Child Welfare Act; Receipt of Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice [Indian Child Welfare Designated Agents]. Federal Register, 64(45), 11490-11499.
Abstract: SUMMARY: This notice is published in exercise of authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs by 209 DM 8.
    The regulations implementing the Indian Child Welfare Act provide that Indian tribes may designate an agent other than the tribal chairman for service of notice proceedings under the Act, 25 CFR 23.12. The Secretary of the Interior shall publish in the Federal Register on an annual basis the names and addresses of the designated agents.
    This is the current list of Designated Tribal Agents for service of notice, and includes the listings of designated tribal agents received by the Secretary of the Interior prior to the date of this publication. ...
Indian Child Welfare Designated Agents ... [emphasis mine]
Marilyn Poitra, ICWA Coordinator, Turtle Mtn. Band of Chippewa Indians, Child Welfare and Family Services, P.O. Box 900, Belcourt, ND 58316; (701) 477-5688 Fax: (701) 477-5797
Pattie Ross, ICWA Director, Red Horse Lodge, Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, P.O. Box 49, Fort Thompson, SD 57339; (605) 245-2322 Fax: (605) 245-2205
Tribal Chairman, Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy Reservation, Rural Route 1, Box 544, Box Elder, Montana 59521; (406) 395-4478 Fax: (406) 395-4497
Kathryn Lapointe, Tribal Social Services Director, Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, Route 2, Box 2700, Hayward, WI 54843; (715) 634-8934
Matt Weber, ICWA Director, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 67, Lac du Flambeau, WI 54538; (715) 588-3303
Delsey Treado, ICWA Director, Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan, P.O. Box 249--Choate Road, Watersmeet, MI 49969; (906) 358-4577
 Adrienne Adkins, Human Services Director, Minnesota Chippewa Tribe of Minnesota, P.O. Box 217, Cass Lake, MN 56633; (218) 335-8581
Nora A. Hiller, ICWA Director, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 529, Bayfield, WI 54814; (715) 779-3700
Michelle Koenig, ICWA Coordinator, Saginaw Chippewa Indians of MI, 7070 East Broadway Road, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858; (517) 772-5700
Nancy L. Kane, ICWA Director, Sokaogon Chippewa (Mole Lake) Community of Wisconsin, Route 1, Box 625, Crandon, WI 54520; (715) 478-2604
Joann Berg, ICWA Coordinator, St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 287, Hertel, WI 54845; (715) 349-2195
Jeri Jasken, ICWA Coordinator, White Earth Reservation Business Committee, P.O. Box 418, White Earth, MN 56591; (218) 983-3285
Catherine Blanchard, ICWA Coordinator, Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 39, Odanah, WI 54861; (715) 682-7111
Julia Jaakola, Social Services Coordinator, Fond du Lac Reservation Business Committee, 105 University Road, Cloquet, MN 55720; (218) 879-4953
Jan Gwuett, Grand Portage Reservation Business Committee, P.O. Box 428, Grand Portage, MN 55605; (218) 475-2277 or 2279 ...
    Dated: February 25, 1999.
Kevin Gover,
Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs.
[FR Doc. 99-5640 Filed 3-8-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-02-P

3516.   United States. Department of the Interior. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Indian Gaming. (1999). Notice of amendment to Approved Tribal-State Compact. Federal Register, 64(47), 12176.
Notes: Source: the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr11mr99-64]
Abstract: SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, Pub. L. 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the Secretary of the Interior shall publish, in the Federal Register, notice of approved Tribal-State Compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III (casino) gambling on Indian reservations. The Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, through his delegated authority, has approved the Amendments to the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1991, which was executed on January 15, 1999.
DATES: This action is effective March 11, 1999.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: George T. Skibine, Director, Indian Gaming Management Staff, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C. 20240, (202) 219-4066.
 Dated: March 4, 1999. Kevin Gover, Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs. [FR Doc. 99-6065 Filed 3-10-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-02-U

3517.   United States. Department of the Interior. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Indian Gaming. (1999). Notice of amendments to approved Tribal-State Compact. Federal Register, 64(58), 14746-14747.
Notes: Source: the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr26mr99-130]
Abstract: SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, Pub. L. 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the Secretary of the Interior shall publish, in the Federal Register, notice of approved Tribal-State Compacts for the purpose of engaging in Class III (casino) gambling on Indian reservations. The Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, through his delegated authority, has approved the Amendments to the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992, which was executed on December 18, 1998.
DATES: This action is effective March 26, 1999.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: George T. Skibine, Director, Indian Gaming Management Staff, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, D.C. 20240, (202) 219-4066.
 Dated: February 11, 1999. Kevin Gover, Assistant Secretary--Indian Affairs. [FR Doc. 99-7514 Filed 3-25-99; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310-02-P

3518.   United States. Department of the Interior. Fish and Wildlife Service, & [Fond du Lac Chippewa]. (1999). 50 CFR Part 20: Migratory Bird Hunting: Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 1999-2000 Season; Proposed Rule. Federal Register, 64(156), 44383-44395.
Abstract: (d) Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Cloquet, Minnesota (Tribal Members Only)
    In 1996, for the first time, the Service and the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians cooperated to establish special migratory bird hunting regulations for tribal members. The Fond du Lac's June 4, 1999, proposal covers land set apart for the band under the Treaty of 1854 in northeast Minnesota.
    The band's proposal for 1999-2000 is essentially the same as that approved last year. Specifically, the Fond du Lac Band proposes a September 11 to November 23, 1999, season on ducks, mergansers, coots and moorhens, and a September 1 to November 28, 1999, season for geese. For sora and Virginia rails, snipe, and woodcock, the Fond du Lac Band proposes a September 1 to November 28, 1999, season. Proposed daily bag limits would consist of the following:
    Ducks: 20 ducks, including no more than 10 mallards (only 5 of which may be hens), 4 black ducks, 4 redheads, 4 pintails, and 2 canvasbacks.
    Mergansers: 5 mergansers, including no more than 1 hooded merganser.
    Geese: 10 geese.
    Coots and Common Moorhens (Common Gallinules): 20 coots and common moorhens, singly or in the aggregate.
    Sora and Virginia Rails: 25 sora and Virginia rails singly, or in the aggregate.
    Common Snipe: 8 common snipe.
    Woodcock: 3 woodcock.
    The following general conditions apply:
    1. While hunting waterfowl, a tribal member must carry on his/her person a valid tribal waterfowl hunting permit.
    2. Except as otherwise noted, tribal members will be required to comply with tribal codes that will be no less restrictive than the provisions of Chapter 10 of the Model Off-Reservation Code. Except as modified by the Service rules adopted in response to this proposal, these amended regulations parallel Federal requirements in 50 CFR part 20 as to hunting methods, transportation, sale, exportation and other conditions generally applicable to migratory bird hunting.
    3. Band members in each zone will comply with State regulations providing for closed and restricted waterfowl hunting areas.
    4. Possession limits for each species are double the daily bag limit, except on the opening day of the season, when the possession limit equals the daily bag limit, unless otherwise noted above. Possession limits are applicable only to transportation and do not include birds which are cleaned, dressed, and at a member's primary residence. For purposes of enforcing bag and possession limits, all migratory birds in the possession or custody of band members on ceded lands will be considered to have been taken on those lands unless tagged by a tribal or State conservation warden as having been taken on-reservation. All migratory birds which fall on reservation lands will not count as part of any off-reservation bag or possession limit.
    The Band anticipates harvest will be fewer than 500 ducks and geese and 150 coots.
    We propose to approve the request for special migratory bird hunting regulations for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewas.

3519.   United States. Department of the Interior. Fish and Wildlife Service, & [Grand Traverse Chippewa]. (1999). 50 CFR Part 20: Migratory Bird Hunting: Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 1999-2000 Season; Proposed Rule. Federal Register, 64(156), 44383-44395.
Abstract: (e) Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Suttons Bay, Michigan (Tribal Members Only)
    In the 1995-96 migratory bird seasons, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians and the Service first cooperated to establish special regulations for waterfowl. The Grand Traverse Band is a self-governing, federally recognized tribe located on the west arm of Grand Traverse Bay in Leelanau County, Michigan. The Grand Traverse Band is a signatory tribe of the Treaty of 1836. We have approved special regulations for tribal members of the 1836 treaty's signatory tribes on ceded lands in Michigan since the 1986-87 hunting season.
    For the 1999-2000 season, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians proposes a tribal member duck season that would run from September 20, 1999, through January 20, 2000. A daily bag limit of 10 would include no more than 1 pintail, 1 canvasback, 1 hooded merganser, 2 black ducks, 2 wood ducks, 2 redheads, and 5 mallards (only 2 of which may be hens). For Canada geese, the tribe proposes a September 1 through November 30, 1999, and a January 1 through February 8, 2000, season. For white-fronted geese, brant, and snow geese, the tribe proposes an October 1 through November 30, 1999, season. The daily bag limit for all geese (including brant) would be 5 birds. Based on our information, it is unlikely that any Canada geese from the Southern James Bay Population would be harvested by the tribe.
    For woodcock, snipe, and sora rail, the tribe proposes a September 1 to November 14, 1999, season. The daily bag limit shall not exceed 5 birds per species.
    All other Federal regulations contained in 50 CFR part 20 would apply. The tribe proposes to closely monitor harvest through game bag checks, patrols, and mail surveys. In particular, the tribe proposes monitoring the harvest of Southern James Bay Canada geese to assess any impacts of tribal hunting on the population.
    We propose to approve the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indian's requested 1999-2000 special migratory bird hunting regulations.

3520.   United States. Department of the Interior. Fish and Wildlife Service, & [Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa]. (1999). 50 CFR Part 20: Migratory Bird Hunting: Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 1999-2000 Season; Proposed Rule. Federal Register, 64(156), 44383-44395.
Abstract: (f) Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, Odanah, Wisconsin (Tribal Members Only)
    Since 1985, various bands of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians have exercised judicially recognized off-reservation hunting rights for migratory birds in Wisconsin. The specific
[[Page 44388]]
regulations were established by the Service in consultation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC, which represents the various bands). Beginning in 1986, a tribal season on ceded lands in the western portion of the State's Upper Peninsula was developed in coordination with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, and we have approved special regulations for tribal members in both Michigan and Wisconsin since the 1986-87, hunting season. In 1987, the GLIFWC requested and we approved special regulations to permit tribal members to hunt on ceded lands in Minnesota, as well as in Michigan and Wisconsin. The States of Michigan and Wisconsin concurred with the regulations, although Wisconsin has raised some concerns each year. Minnesota did not concur with the regulations, stressing that the State would not recognize Chippewa Indian hunting rights in Minnesota's treaty area until a court with jurisdiction over the State acknowledges and defines the extent of these rights. We acknowledge the State's concern, but pointed out that the United States Government has recognized the Indian hunting rights decided in the Voigt case, and that acceptable hunting regulations have been negotiated successfully in both Michigan and Wisconsin even though the Voigt decision did not specifically address ceded land outside Wisconsin. We believe this is appropriate because the treaties in question cover ceded lands in Michigan (and Minnesota), as well as in Wisconsin. Consequently, in view of the above, we have approved special regulations since the 1987-
88 hunting season on ceded lands in all three States. In fact, this recognition of the principle of reserved treaty rights for band members to hunt and fish was pivotal in our decision to approve a special 1991-
92 season for the 1836 ceded area in Michigan.
    Recently, certain GLIFWC member bands have brought suit to resolve the issue of hunting, fishing and gathering rights in the Minnesota ceded areas covered under the 1837 and 1854 treaties. The Federal Government has intervened in support of the bands.
    In a June 3, 1999, letter, the GLIFWC proposed off-reservation special migratory bird hunting regulations for the 1999-2000 seasons on behalf of the member tribes of the Voigt Intertribal Task Force of the GLIFWC (for the 1837 and 1842 Treaty areas) and the Bay Mills Indian Community (for the 1836 Treaty area). Member tribes of the Task Force are: the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians, The Lake Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians, the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians, the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians, the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, the Sokaogon Chippewa Community (Mole Lake Band), the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians in Minnesota, the Lac Vieux Desert Band of Chippewa Indians, and the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community in Michigan. Details of the proposed regulations are shown below. In general, the proposal is essentially the same as the regulations approved for the 1998-99 season.
    Results of the 1998-99 hunter survey show that 599 ducks and 177 geese were harvested under an anticipated harvest of 3,000 ducks and 900 geese. Under the proposed regulations, harvest is expected to be similar to last year and most likely would not exceed 2,500 ducks and 800 geese.
    We believe that regulations advanced by the GLIFWC for the 1999-
2000 hunting season are biologically acceptable and recommend approval. If the regulations are finalized as proposed, we would request that the GLIFWC closely monitor the member band duck harvest and take any actions necessary to reduce harvest if locally nesting populations are being significantly impacted.
    The Commission and the Service are parties to a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) designed to facilitate the ongoing enforcement of Service-approved tribal migratory bird regulations. Its intent is to provide long-term cooperative application.
    Also, as in recent seasons, the proposal contains references to Chapter 10 of the Migratory Bird Harvesting Regulations of the Model Off-Reservation Conservation Code. Chapter 10 regulations parallel State and Federal regulations and, in effect, are not changed by this proposal.
    The GLIFWC's proposed 1999-2000 waterfowl hunting season regulations are as follows:
Ducks
A. Wisconsin and Minnesota 1837 and 1842 Zones
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 20 ducks, including no more than 10 mallards (only 5 of which may be hens), 4 black ducks, 4 redheads, 4 pintails, and 2 canvasbacks.
B. Michigan 1836 and 1842 Treaty Zones
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 10 ducks, including no more than 5 mallards (only 2 of which may be hens), 2 black ducks, 2 redheads, 2 pintails, and 1 canvasback.
Mergansers
A. Wisconsin and Minnesota 1837 and 1842 Zones
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 5 mergansers.
B. Michigan 1836 and 1842 Treaty Zones
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 5 mergansers, including no more than 1 hooded merganser.
    Geese: All Ceded Areas:
    Season Dates: Begin September 1 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 10 geese.
Other Migratory Birds: All Ceded Areas
A. Coots and Common Moorhens (Common Gallinules)
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 20 coots and common moorhens (common gallinules), singly or in the aggregate.
B. Sora and Virginia Rails
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 25 sora and Virginia rails singly, or in the aggregate.
C. Common Snipe
    Season Dates: Begin September 15 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 8 common snipe.
D. Woodcock
    Season Dates: Begin September 7 and end December 1, 1999.
    Daily Bag Limit: 5 woodcock.
General Conditions
    1. While hunting waterfowl, a tribal member must carry on his/her person a valid tribal waterfowl hunting permit.
    2. Except as otherwise noted, tribal members will be required to comply with tribal codes that will be no less restrictive than the provisions of Chapter 10 of the Model Off-Reservation Code. Except as modified by the Service rules adopted in response to this proposal, these amended regulations parallel Federal requirements in 50 CFR Part 20 as to hunting methods, transportation, sale, exportation and
[[Page 44389]]
other conditions generally applicable to migratory bird hunting.
    3. Tribal members in each zone will comply with State regulations providing for closed and restricted waterfowl hunting areas.
    4. Possession limits for each species are double the daily bag limit, except on the opening day of the season, when the possession limit equals the daily bag limit, unless otherwise noted above. Possession limits are applicable only to transportation and do not include birds which are cleaned, dressed, and at a member's primary residence. For purposes of enforcing bag and possession limits, all migratory birds in the possession or custody of tribal members on ceded lands will be considered to have been taken on those lands unless tagged by a tribal or State conservation warden as having been taken on-reservation. In Wisconsin, such tagging will comply with applicable State laws. All migratory birds which fall on reservation lands will not count as part of any off-reservation bag or possession limit.
    5. Minnesota and Michigan--Duck Blinds and Decoys. Tribal members hunting in Michigan and Minnesota will comply with tribal codes that contain provisions that parallel applicable State laws concerning duck blinds and/or decoys.

3521.   United States. Department of the Interior. Fish and Wildlife Service, & [White Earth Band of Chippewa]. (1999). 50 CFR Part 20: Migratory Bird Hunting: Proposed Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 1999-2000 Season; Proposed Rule. Federal Register, 64(156), 44383-44395.
Abstract:  (t) White Earth Band of Chippewa, White Earth, Minnesota (Tribal Members Only)
    The White Earth Band of Chippewa is a federally recognized tribe located in northwest Minnesota and encompasses all of Mahnomen County and parts of Becker and Clearwater Counties. The reservation employs conservation officers to enforce conservation regulations. For the first time in the 1999-2000 season, the tribe proposes to establish migratory bird hunting seasons on reservation lands.
    In a July 28, 1999, letter, the tribe proposed a duck, merganser, and coot season of September 18 to November 30, 1999. The daily bag limit of 7 would include no more than 2 mallards and 1 canvasback through September 24 and no more than 2 hen mallards and 2 canvasbacks through the remainder of the season. The merganser daily bag limit would be 5 with no more than 2 hooded mergansers, and the coot daily bag limit would be 20. For geese, the tribe proposes a September 1 to November 30, 1999, season with a daily bag limit of 5 geese.
    For dove, rail, woodcock, and snipe, the tribe proposes a September 11 to December 1, 1999, season with daily bag limits of 25 rails, 10 snipe, 10 woodcock, and 25 doves. Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Non-toxic shot is required.
    Based on past harvest surveys, the tribe expects a harvest of less than 500 Canada geese and 1000 ducks.
    We propose to approve the White Earth Band of Chippewa's requested 1999-2000 special migratory bird hunting regulations.

3522.   (1978). Washington, D.C. 20240: Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3523.   United States. Department of the Interior. National Park Service. (1999). Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains, Associated Funerary Object, and Unassociated Funerary Object in the Possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN. Federal Register, 64(71), 18445-18446.
Abstract:     Notice is hereby given in accordance with provisions of the Native American
[[Page 18446]]
Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 43 CFR 10.9, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe.
    In 1938, human remains representing one individual were removed from Osufen Mound (21-IC-02), MN, a site within the exterior boundaries of the Leech Lake Reservation, by L.A. Wilford of the University of Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The associated funerary object is a metal axe.
    Based on the associated funerary object, this burial has been identified as Native American from the historic period. The Osufen Mound site is located within the exterior boundaries of the Leech Lake Indian Reservation.
    The cultural item is a ceramic vessel.
    In 1944, this ceramic vessel was donated to the University of Minnesota by George Kremer. University of Minnesota indicates this vessel was removed from an eroding burial on Lake Winnibigoshish, MN. Lake Winnibigoshish is located within the exterior boundaries of the Leech Lake Indian Reservation.
    Based on the above mentioned information, officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have also determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2), the one object listed above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(2)(ii), the one cultural item is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of an Native American individual. Lastly, officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (e), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between these Native American human remains, associated funerary object, and the unassociated funerary object and the Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe.
    This notice has been sent to officials of the Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe and the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these human remains and associated funerary objects should contact James L. (Jim) Jones, Cultural Resource Specialist, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 1819 Bemidji Ave. Bemidji, MN 56601; telephone: (218) 755-3825, before May 14, 1999. Repatriation of the human remains, associated funerary object, and unassociated funerary object to the Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe may begin after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
Dated: April 8, 1999.
Francis P. McManamon,
Departmental Consulting Archeologist,
Manager, Archeology and Ethnography Program.
[FR Doc. 99-9327 Filed 4-13-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-70-F

3524.   United States. Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. (1872). Chippewa half-breeds of Lake Superior. Letter from the Secretary of the Interior in answer to a resolution of the House of December 20, 1871, relative to the issuance of scrip to the half-breeds or mixed-bloods belonging to the Chippewas of Lake Supererior. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Title from caption. "March 15, 1872.--Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to be printed." F.A. Walker, commissioner of Indian affairs.

3525.   United States. Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. (1934). Circular Number 80426. Circular letter.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3526.   United States. Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. (1934). Circular Number 81642 82069.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

3527.   United States. Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Lists showing the degree of blood of certain persons holding land on the White Earth Reservation, Minnesota.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[archived at the Minnesota Historical Society]

3528.   United States. Department of Transportation. Federal Highway Administration. (1999). 23 CFR Part 661: [FHWA Docket No. FHWA-98-4743]: RIN 2125-AE57:  Indian Reservation Road Bridge Program: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT: Interim final rule. Federal Register, 64(137), 38565-38575.
Notes: Source: the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr19jy99-10]
Abstract: SUMMARY: Section 1115 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century establishes a nationwide priority program for improving deficient Indian reservation road (IRR) bridges and reserves $13 million of IRR funds per year to replace and rehabilitate bridges that are in poor condition. The FHWA, Federal Lands Highway (FLH), and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Division of Transportation (BIADOT), intend to implement the IRR bridge program (IRRBP) to promptly address the deficient IRR bridges. Toward that end, the FLH and the BIADOT, in consultation with Indian tribal governments (ITG)s and other public commenters, have developed interim project selection/fund allocation procedures for uniform application of the legislation. In this document, the FHWA is announcing interim project selection/fund allocation procedures for the IRRBP.
DATES: This rule is effective on July 19, 1999.
ADDRESSES: Your signed, written comments must refer to the docket number appearing at the top of this document and you must submit your comments to the Docket Clerk, U.S. DOT Dockets, Room PL-401, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590-0001. All comments will be available for examination at the above address between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., e.t., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Those desiring notification of receipt of comments must include a self- addressed, stamped envelope or postcard.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Wade F. Casey, Federal Lands Highway, HFPD-9, (202) 366-9486; or Ms. Grace Reidy, Office of Chief Counsel, HCC-32, (202) 366-6226; Federal Highway Administration, 400 Seventh Street SW., Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., e.t., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
Electronic Access
 Internet users can access all comments received by the U.S. DOT Dockets, Room PL-401, by using the universal resource locator (URL): http://dms.dot.gov. It is available 24 hours each day, 365 days each year. Please follow the instructions online for more information and help. An electronic copy of this document may be downloaded by using a modem and suitable communications software from the Government Printing Office's Electronic Bulletin Board Service at (202) 512-1661. Internet users may reach the Federal Register's home page at: http:// www.nara.gov/fedreg and the Government Printing Office's database at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara.
Background
 Section 1115 of TEA-21, amended title 23, U.S.C., to require the Secretary to establish a nationwide priority program for improving deficient IRR bridges. Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for IRRs for each fiscal year beginning with FY1998 and continuing through FY2003, section 1115 requires the Secretary, in cooperation with the Secretary of the Interior, to reserve not less than $13 million for projects to replace, rehabilitate, seismically retrofit, paint, apply calcium magnesium acetate to, apply sodium acetate/formate or other environmentally acceptable, minimally corrosive anti-icing and de-icing compositions, or install scour countermeasures for deficient IRR bridges, including multiple-pipe culverts. The statute provides that, to be eligible to receive funding under the Nationwide Priority Bridge Program, a bridge must: (i) Have an opening of 20 feet or more; (ii) be on an IRR; (iii) be unsafe because of structural deficiencies, physical deterioration, or functional obsolescence; and (iv) be recorded in the national bridge inventory (NBI) administered by the Secretary under 23 U.S.C. 144(b). The statute further provides that the funds to carry out IRR bridge projects shall be made available only on approval of plans, specifications, and estimates (PS&E) by the Secretary. In order to implement the IRRBP established in section 1115 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), Pub. L. 105- 178, 112 Stat. 107, codified at 23 U.S.C. 202(d)(4)(A), and in order to promptly address the deficient IRR bridges, the FHWA and the BIADOT, in consultation with Indian tribal governments (ITG)s and other interested parties, have developed project selection/fund allocation procedures which will be incorporated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) as an interim final rule.
Comments Received on the IRRBP
 The FHWA solicited comments through informal meetings with tribal representatives in early December, 1998. A two page summary requesting comment on interim guidance was provided to the tribal representatives and also sent out to tribes not in attendance at those meetings. The two page summary was forwarded via the tribal local technical assistance program centers and the BIA area offices to Indian tribal governments( ITG)s. Following this, the FHWA published a notice in the Federal Register on February 12, 1999, requesting comments on the project selection/fund allocation procedures being considered for the IRRBP. The notice provided for a 30-day public comment period ending March 15, 1999. Comments were received from five ITGs, seven Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) offices, one county, and one State Department of Transportation. The FHWA considered all comments
[[Page 38566]]
received in developing project selection/fund allocation procedures that are set forth in this notice as interim final rules for the IRRBP. While FHWA is issuing these interim final rules to make funds available as soon as possible this fiscal year, we welcome any comments on them. As discussed subsequently in the ``RULEMAKING ANALYSES'' portion of this preamble, there exists good cause in this instance for adopting interim final rules to ensure that funds may be readily dispersed under the IRRBP. We emphasize that the rule adopted here will be ``interim'' in nature. Prior to issuance of the final rule, the FHWA will invite and actively consider comments introduced concerning this action and will assess how the IRRBP is working, including the fund allocation process based on experience with these rules. As the FHWA gathers more experience and feedback with the project selection/fund allocation process under the interim final rules, the FHWA will revisit the funding allocation process and propose appropriate changes as necessary to insure the operational effectiveness of the IRRBP. The FHWA intends to fully utilize IRRBP funds and to continually monitor the performance of the program to insure that all IRRBP funds are fully utilized. The funding allocation procedures will be influenced by our experience under these interim final rules. Comments introduced in response to general issues concerning the IRRBP raised in the prior notice are addressed in the Section-by- Section Analysis, that follows.
Section-by-Section Analysis …
11. What Percent of the Contract Authority in any Fiscal Year is Available for Use on BIA Owned Bridges and non-BIA Owned IRR Bridges? (Sec. 661.35)
 The majority of the commenters wanted to see 100 percent of the IRRBP funds going toward BIA owned IRR bridges. FHWA Response: The statute established this program for deficient IRR bridges and did not simply prescribe the IRRBP funds for sole use on BIA owned IRR bridges. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians commented that there should be no distinction in ownership. Another commenter, Isabella County in Michigan, felt that non-BIA IRR bridges serve Tribal communities and to limit the annual funding for these bridges would be a disservice to the Tribal community. FHWA Response: While the Federal government has both a trust responsibility and ownership of the BIA bridges on Indian reservations, States and counties also have a responsibility and themselves own other IRR bridges. Therefore, the IRRBP which is funded exclusively by the Federal government, should not bear the full burden of rehabilitation and replacement costs associated with non-BIA owned IRR bridges. Ownership is relevant in determining the percentage of funding for non- BIA IRR bridges and is an issue since the States and counties have ownership and primary responsibility for their bridges. The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan stated that the eastern tribes were being penalized. FHWA Response: Under the former ``not less than 1 percent'' Highway Bridge Replacement and Rehabilitation Program (HBRRP), funding was State specific and the bulk of funding was provided for the tribes east of the Mississippi River. The IRRBP is correcting an inequity that the HBRRP created. Under the IRRBP, funding is not State specific, but can be used in any State. The only tribes that are penalized are ones which fail to submit PS&E packages for IRRBP funding. The Cherokee Nation commented that the Oklahoma tribes are not treated fairly under the proposed procedures. FHWA Response: While the 80-20 split is designed to provide the bulk of the funding for BIA bridges, it also takes into account the need to fund non-BIA owned IRR bridges. The $2.6 million provided each fiscal year (1998-2003) will enable the elimination of numerous deficient non-BIA owned IRR bridges in Oklahoma or any other State regardless of geographic location to the extent ITGs are willing to participate. Presently there is $5.2 million available for non-BIA owned IRR bridges under the 80-20 split approach (representing FY 1998 and FY 1999 available funds). We modified our position announced in the prior notice to provide carryover funding for non-BIA owned IRR bridges from one fiscal year to the next, to provide a uniform carryover policy for both BIA and non- BIA owned IRR bridges. It reads as follows. Up to 80 percent ($10.4 million) of funding in any fiscal year would be available for use on BIA owned IRR bridges. This would leave 20 percent ($2.6 million) of funding in any fiscal year that would be available for use on non-BIA owned IRR bridges. A smaller percentage of available funds has been set aside for non-BIA IRR bridges, since States and counties have access to Federal-aid and other funding to replace and rehabilitate their bridges and that 23 U.S.C. 204(c) requires that IRR funds be supplemental to and not in lieu of other funds apportioned to the State. The program policy will be to maximize the number of IRR bridges participating in the IRRBP in a given fiscal year regardless of ownership. ...
20. Once Eligibility of a Bridge Project has Been Determined, how Will the Project be Funded/Programmed? (Sec. 661.9)
 Several alternatives were set forth in the prior notice and we considered them fully in our review. For ease of
[[Page 38570]]
reference, the alternatives are presented in tabular form at the end of this topic. For BIA owned IRR bridges, the Pueblo of Zuni, BIA Aberdeen Area Office and BIA Great Lakes Agency generally preferred alternative 1; the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians preferred alternative 1 along with a modified alternative 4; the New York State DOT preferred alternative 2; the Cherokee Nation preferred a combination of alternatives 2, 3 and 5 coupled with an Indian population factor; the Navajo Nation and the BIA Navajo Area Office preferred alternative 3; the BIA Billings Area Office and BIA Fort Belknap Agency preferred alternative 4; and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation preferred alternative 5. The BIA Phoenix Area Office wanted to see a triage approach involving funding of the ``worst first''. Most commenters did not want to see funding for non-BIA owned IRR bridges. Four commenters, the Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan and Isabella County, desire funding for non-BIA owned IRR bridges. FHWA Response: The purpose of the IRRBP is to optimize the number of IRR bridges rehabilitated or replaced with the intent of eliminating as many deficient IRR bridges as possible during the TEA-21 period of authorization. Alternative 4 provides a first in and first out approach to fund these projects and, as such, would meet the program objective. Alternative 5, priorization of projects, would be used in cases where application packages arrive at the same time and the procedure outlines a method to settle any issues if such a situation were to occur. Alternative 4 is believed to maximize the number of IRR bridges participating in the IRRBP in a given fiscal year. Funding for the IRRBP should be fully utilized in a given fiscal year to eliminate deficient IRR bridges which pose a potential safety problem for the Tribes and motoring public; to maximize the number of bridges participating in the IRRBP; and to reduce the impact of obligation limitation deductions on the IRR program from one fiscal year to the next by fully obligating available IRRBP funding. We realize that this whole program hinges on ITGs using their regular IRR program funds for development of PS&E packages regardless of the approach being used. For non-BIA IRR bridges, the procedures using 20 percent of the IRRBP funds should parallel the same procedures adopted for the BIA owned IRR bridges. While alternative 1, deficient bridge deck area percentage, provides allocation of funds to be set aside for at a specific BIA Area Office, it has the potential to tie bridge program funds up among the 12 BIA area offices for an unknown period of time. There is the likelihood of some BIA Area Offices not having PS&E packages in order to use up all of the available funding under this alternative. This being the case, it would impact the other BIA Area Offices regarding the amount of regular IRR funds available in the following fiscal year. Alternative 1 is not likely to maximize the rehabilitation and replacement of deficient IRR bridges. Alternative 2, deficient bridge deck area percentage--State specific, follows along the same line as alternative 1, but would be State specific. Alternative 3, percentage of deficient bridges, does not reflect a true measure for programming bridges since it is based on numbers of deficient bridges. A small bridge will have the same value as a larger, more costly bridge. The costs will not be proportional and therefore not maximize the use of the IRRBP funding. Alternatives 1, 2 and 3 essentially have similar limitations imposed on the bridge program as the previous ``not less than 1 percent'' HBRRP which many people complained about. Congress eliminated the ``not less than 1 percent'' HBRRP with the TEA-21 Restoration Act. The basis of the complaints had to do with inequities in funding with more going toward bridges east of the Mississippi River when a greater number of deficient IRR bridges are actually to the west of the Mississippi River. In some cases the HBRRP funding was not being fully utilized. We believe that after determination of bridge project eligibility, funding and/or programming should consist of a combination of alternatives 4 and 5. Based on the preceding discussion, the response to the question of how projects will be funded/programmed is as follows: Funding and/or programming of construction projects for BIA owned IRR bridges would be based on the order of receipt of a complete application package, i.e., eligibility requirements met, PS&E package is complete, etc. All application packages would be placed in a queue upon submission to the BIADOT and date stamped. This submission queue would form the basis for prioritization during any fiscal year. After the queue for the FY is filled up, that is, the obligation limitation is used up, a queue for the following FY would be established. In those cases where application packages have arrived at the same time, application packages would be ranked and prioritized based on: (i) Bridge sufficiency rating; (ii) bridge status with structurally deficient having precedence over functionally obsolete; (iii) bridges on school bus routes; (iv) detour length; (v) ADT; and (vi) truck ADT. Funding and approval would be based on this priority ranking.
 Alternatives for the IRR Bridge Program 

3529.   United States. Dept.  (1848). [Selected files relating to Minnesota and nor ...
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

3530.   United States. Dept. of the Army. (1975). Final environmental impact statement, operation and maintenance activities, Red Lake and Clearwater Rivers Project, Minnesota. St. Paul, Minn.: Dept. of the Army.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  United States. Dept. of the Army. Operation and maintenance activities, Red Lake and Clearwater Rivers Project, Minnesota. Red Lake and Clearwater Rivers Project, Minnesota.

3531.   United States. Dept. of the Interior. (1901). Hearing before the Secretary of the Interior in the matter of certain contracts for the sale and purchase of dead and down timber on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation, in the state of Minnesota : held at the Interior Department, Thursday, December 20, and Friday, December 21, 1900. Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 10621150.  Other: United States. Dept. of the Interior. Certain contracts for the sale and purchase of dead and down timber on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation, in the state of Minnesota.

3532.   . (1884). United States. Dept. of the InteriorMille Lac [sic] Indian Reservation in Minnesota. Letter from the acting Secretary of the Interior, transmitting report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs relative to Mille Lac [sic] Reservation, in answer to resolution of the House of Representatives of March 21 . Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25472572. Title from caption. April 29, 1884.--Referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs and ordered to be printed. M.L. Joslyn, acting secretary.

3533.   . (1908). United States. Dept. of the InteriorModification of agreement with Red Lake Indians letter from the Secretary of the Interior, recommending modification of agreement with the Red Lake Indians . Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 17087201

3534.   United States. Dept. of the Interior. (1949). "Open house," Red Lake Reservation, commemorating a century of conservation by Department of the Interior, 1849-1949. Red Lake, Minn.?
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Cover title. Title page missing, replaced by slip (tipped in): Centennial (1849-1959 [sic]) tourist guide (open house-) on Red Lake Reservation (300 copies)

3535.   United States. Dept. of the Interior. Bureau of Indian Affairs. (1938). Rocky Boy's Preliminary Project Plan for Land Acquisitions Under the Indian Reorganization Act . in available at the National Archives, Pacific NW Region, Fort Belknap Indian Agency, Land Acquisitions Project Files, 1937-47.
Notes: Source: cited by Cosens, Barbara A.  (Winter 1998:footnote 84).  The actual outlines of the maximum purchase area were not articulated until 1939 in a report accompanying an Act of Congress. See infra note However, it appears that the area arose from the recommendations of a group of federal officials who met in Great Falls in 1936 to discuss the needs of Montana's landless Indians. See Letter from Superintendent Wooldridge to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, (Dec. 10, 1936).

3536.   . (1975). United States. Dept. of the Interior. Office of the SolicitorDraft model code to govern the administration of justice by courts of Indian offenses on Indian reservations . Washington : United States. Dept. of the Interior. Office of the Solicitor [The Solicitor].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 31790735.  Title supplied from first page of "Notice". Notice signed: Kent Frizzell, Solicitor.
Abstract: Model code to govern the administration of justice by courts of Indian offenses on Indian reservations.

3537.   United States. Dept. of the Interior. Solicitor. (1975). Draft model code to govern the administration of justice by courts of Indian offenses on Indian reservations . Washington: The Solicitor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Title supplied from first page of "Notice". Notice signed: Kent Frizzell, Solicitor. Photocopy of typescript.

3538.   . (1980). United States. Economic Development AdministrationForest products marketing study; Red Lake Indian Reservation [Red Lake forest products marketing study] . [Washington, D.C.] : Economic Development Administration.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search). Cover title: Forest products marketing study; Red Lake Indian Reservation.  Other: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians. United States. Economic Development Administration. Walter Butler Company. Forest products marketing study; Red Lake Indian Reservation.

3539.   United States. Economic Development Administration, & Mater Engineering, LTD. (1971). A study of feasibility of additional forest industry on Red Lake Indian Reservation, Redlake Minnesota . Corvallis, Or.  Mater Engineering.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 3267394.  Contract no. 0-35406. "This technical assistance study was accomplished by professional consultants under contract with the Economic Development Administration. ..."

3540.   United States. General Accounting Office, & United States. Indian Claims Commission. (1959). Petitions of the Red Lake, Pembina, Turtle Mountain, et al., Bands of Chippewa Indians. Washington, D.C.  General Accounting Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  "Indian Claims Commission, nos. 18-A, 18-E, 18-G, 18-H, 18-J, 18-K, 18-L, 18-M, 113, 191 and 246." At head of title: General Accounting Office Report.

3541.   United States. General Land Office. (1896). Ceded Chippewa pine lands, Minnesota. (Red Lake Reservation). Instructions, minutes of examinations, and schedule of appraisements. Act of January 14, 1889 ... as amended by act of February 26, 1896 ... Approved April 24, 1896. Washington: Govt. Print. Off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ... accession: 31632262. Title from cover. "Approved April 21, 1896."

3542.   United States. General Land Office. (1898). Ceded Chippewa pine lands, Minnesota (Red Lake Reservation) : instructions, minutes of examinations, and schedule of appraisements. Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Title from cover. "Approved June 14, 1898." Signed: Binger Hermann, Commissioner, General Land Office. Chiefly tables.  Other: United States. General Land Office. Chippewa pine lands, Minnesota.

3543.   United States. General Land Office. (1910). Chippewa agricultural lands, Minnesota. Washington, D.C.  G.P.O.
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 10035658. Title from caption. Signed: S.V. Proudfit, Assistant Commissioner, General Land Office, May 10, 1910.

3544.   United States. General Land Office. (1911). Chippewa agricultural lands, Minnesota  . Washington, [D.C.] : G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21478101.  Title from caption.

3545.   United States. General Land Office. (1904). Rules and regulations under the act of February 20, 1904 (Public--no. 23), for the sale of a part of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in the state of Minnesota . Washington, D.C.  General Land Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21460633.  Title from caption. "May 10, 1904." Circular.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

3546.   Aeromagnetic map of parts of Pennington, Red Lake, Beltrami, Clearwater, and Polk Counties, Minnesota : total intensity contours relative to arbitrary datum . (1958). Washington, D.C.  Geological Survey (U.S.).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21053747.  "Aeromagnetic survey flown 500 feet above surface in 1952 by W.J. Dempsey and L.A. Anderson. Geology by G.M. Schwartz." Includes text, index map, and map. Sheet 1. Aeromagnetic map -- sheet 2. Aeromagnetic profiles ..., traverses 105-133.
 Other: Books, Kenneth G. Aeromagnetic profiles of parts of Pennington, Red Lake, Beltrami, and Clearwater Counties, Minnesota, traverses 105- 133. Pennington, Red Lake, Beltrami, and Clearwater and Polk Counties, Minnesota, aeromagnetic map.

3547.   Aeromagnetic map of Western Red Lake and Central Polk Counties, Minnesota : total intensity contours relative to arbitrary datum . (1958). Washington, D.C.  Geological Survey (U.S.).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21053762.  Other: Books, Kenneth G. Aeromagnetic profiles of Western Red Lake and Central Polk Counties, Minnesota, traverses 133-156. Western Red Lake and Central Polk Counties, Minnesota, aeromagnetic map.
Abstract: "Aeromagnetic survey flown 500 feet above surface in 1952 by W.J. Dempsey and L.A. Anderson. Geology by G.M. Schwartz." Includes text, index map, and map. Sheet 1. Aeromagnetic map -- sheet 2. Aeromagnetic profiles ..., traverses, 133-156.

3548.   Map of Red Lake and its vicinity. (1895). [Washington, D.C.] : USGS.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26368511. Relief indicated by hachures. Includes notes on vegetation.

3549.   . (1914). United States. Geological Survey.Red Lake Reservation, Minn. letter from the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting a report of the drainage survey of the Red Lake Diminished Reservation, Minn.  Washington, D.C.  Hovt. Print. Off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27646529.  Ordered printed, with illustrations, May 22, 1914. Report made by the United States Geological Survey.

3550.   Upper Red Lake quadrangle, Minnesota 1:100 000-scale series (topographic) . (1978). Reston, Va.  U. S. Geological Survey .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Relief shown by contours and spot heights. "Compiled in 1977 ... ." Includes location map and index to 1:24 000-scale orthophotomaps. "N4800--W9400/30x60."

3551.   Reconnaissance of the Red Lake River, Minnesota [Red Lake River, Minnesota]. (1969). Washington, D.C.  Geological Survey (U.S.).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 20866991
Abstract: Includes text, bibliography, and index map. Sheet 1. Physical characteristics and recreational facilities. Surficial geologic map (after Leverett, 1932). Glacial map of Minnesota. Topographic maps -- sheet 2. Description. History. Biota. Map showing areas of forest and prairie in the 1800's. Hydrology I-II. Water quality I- IV

3552.   United States. Indian Affairs, Committee on (Senate, 57:1.). (1902). Agreement with Red Lake and Pembina bands of Chippewa Indians of Minnesota. April 12, 1902. Washington.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  n.t-p. U.S. 57. cong., 1. sess. Senate rept. 1087

3553.   United States. Indian Claims Commission. (1976). Before the Indian Claims Commission, docket nos. 113, 246, 191 and 221, Turtle Mountain band of Chippewa Indians, Red Lake and Pembina bands, Little Shell band of Chippewa Indians, plaintiffs, v. the United States of America, defendant : government's brief, requested findings of fact and objections to plaintiffs' proposed findings of fact.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Chippewa Indians, plaintiff. United States, defendant.

 

 

 

 

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