Ojibwe Bibliography – part 4

[01-19-04]

 

 

1691.   Jones, V. H. (1936). Some Chippewa and Ottawa uses of sweetgrass. Papers of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters for 1935, 21, 21-31.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56)

1692.   Fisher, M. W. (1939). Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin. Washington, D.C.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1693.   Jones, W. (1913). Kickapoo ethnological notes. American Anthropologist, 15, 332-335.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1694.   Jones, W. (1915). Kickapoo Tales. Publications of the American Ethnological Society, 9.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
published in New York

1695.   Jones, W. (1916). Ojibwa tales from North Shore of Lake Superior. Journal of American Folklore, 29, 368-391.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56)

1696.   Jones, W. (1917). Ojibwa Texts. T. Michelson (editor), Publications of the American Ethnological Society  Vol. 7, Chap. Part 1, ).
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1697.   Jones, W. (1919). Ojibwa Texts. Publications of the American Ethnological Society Vol. 7, Chap. part 2, ). New York.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1698.   Jung, P. J. (1998). Forge, destroy and preserve the bonds of empire: Euro-Americans, Native Americans and Metis on the Wisconsin frontier, 1634-1856. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Marquette University.
Abstract: This study seeks to resolve the historiographical controversy concerning the nature of the American frontier experience by applying anthropological theories of domination and resistance to a limited geographical area, namely present-day Wisconsin, to examine the interaction between Euro-Americans, Native Americans, and mixed-blood metis. When applied to this region, these theories reveal a process whereby colonial powers such as the French, British, and Americans attempted to gain control over the Indian and metis inhabitants, but these groups always maintained enough cultural and political autonomy to be able to resist complete domination. In most cases, this resistance was subtle and did not threaten the sovereignty of the colonial powers, but at times it was violent and sought to upset their rule. This was particularly true of the Fox Wars during the French regime, Pontiac's Rebellion under the British, and the 1827 Winnebago Uprising and the 1832 Black Hawk War under the United States. When the colonial powers encountered such resistance, they always used coercive power to force recalcitrant communities back into their empires, but they also used persuasive techniques that the Italian social theorist Antonio Gramsci has described as hegemony. This study focuses upon the American phase of colonial rule in the region of present-day Wisconsin since the Americans ultimately gained final sovereignty. An analysis of the federal government's program for gaining domination over the region further indicates that two distinct processes occurred. From about 1815 to 1832, the United States was not able to exert much more control over the region than the French or British had, and the Indian and metis inhabitants retained a large measure of autonomy. This phenomenon has been described by Richard White as the 'middle ground,' and in this study it is labeled the 'frontier phase.' After the Black Hawk War, the United States was able to bring much more coercive and hegemonic power to bear over the region, and the power shifted inalterably to the side of the federal government. This was the 'pioneer phase,' and it led to a destruction of the cultural and political autonomy of the Indian and metis communities of Wisconsin.

1699.   Juniper, G. D. (1992). The state, natives and the economy of the Northwest Territories: 1945-1990 (Native Americans). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada).
Abstract: A number of Marxian derived concepts on the modern state and capital are drawn upon to explore the argument that the continued disadvantaged socio-economic position of the majority of the north's native population is primarily the result of the northern state's accumulation strategy set in motion during the 1950s. As part of this strategy, the state set out to provide a largely subsistence based Inuit, Indian and Metis population with southern styled community infrastructure, which included an educational system. The central thrust of the state's development strategy has failed for all but a small percentage of the native labour force. Since the mid-1970s, the state has increased its support for the subsistence economy. The state has taken the lead with affirmative action programs and is now the single largest employer of native people in the north. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

1700.   Justice, M. A. (1996). Orality, literacy and the electronic age in Louise Erdrich's fiction. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Northeast Missouri State University.
Abstract: This thesis links Walter Ong's theories in Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word to the issues of rising literacy in Louise Erdrich's fiction. Using Ong's theories I analyze Erdrich's novels, Tracks, Love Medicine, and The Bingo Palace, beginning with her use of oral tradition, portrayal of the clash between orality and literacy, and incorporation of electronic media. While Ong's perspective stems from a more global, objective point of view, Erdrich demonstrates the powerful and often devastating effect of literacy on the Chippewa community from which she draws the central characters of her novels.

1701.   Kaczmarek, J. A. (1999). The dream dance: an examination of its music and practice among woodlands and central subartic Indians (Manitoba, Ontario, North Dakota, Minnesota). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Manitoba (Canada).
Abstract: The Dream Dance religion, which originated among the Santee Sioux of North Dakota around 1870, was subsequently transferred to the Minnesota Ojibwe, where it became an important ceremony of the Indian nations west and south of Lake Superior. The requirement for the transfer of the ceremony, together with the Drum, dance attire, and the special songs and dances which are integral to the ceremony, are believed to have taken the Dream Dance as far north as the Berens River region of Manitoba and northwestern Ontario. This belief is based on historical evidence: information pieced together from journals, letters, photographs and personal interviews. In the course of the more recent investigations, former participants in the Berens River ceremonies shared some of the songs which formed part of their ceremony. It is on these songs that this paper focuses. The process involved a comparison of the two ceremonies, and a comprehensive examination and analysis of the musicological features of the ceremonial songs from both regions. It was determined that although each ceremony likely served a different purpose, the songs performed in the Berens Rivers ceremony, allowing for certain specified variations, derived from that of the Dream Dance ceremony.

1702.   Kalinoski, L. L. (1983). The termination crisis: the Menominee Indians versus the federal government, 1943-1961 (Wisconsin). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Toledo.
Abstract: In the 1950's native Americans faced a series of political challenges which threatened to make wide reaching changes in the nature of tribal life. The most crucial of these was the attempt by members of Congress and white economic interests to curtail or greatly restrict the scope of federal aid to Indians. The Menominee Indians of Wisconsin, considered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs to be one of the wealthiest and most advanced tribes in the country, were a principal target of those whites who believed Indians should be forced to assimilate in to white society. The tribe's status as a target of the budget-cutters was, in part, a reaction to the Menominees' success in pressing their claims against the federal government. The Court of Claims, in 1950, found the federal government guilty of negligence and mismanagement. The movement to terminate all federal aid to Indians was first expressed with the passage of the Indian Claims Commission Act of 1946 which was envisioned as a way of settling long-standing Indian claims so that the government could subsequently reduce its support of the tribes. The crisis over the Menominee Termination Act lasted from 1954 until 1973 when Congress passed The Menominee Restoration Act which permitted the Menominees to regain their federally protected status. During that period, the Menominees saw their tribal reserves of $10,500,000 wiped out by the expenses mandated by termination. The only solution posed by federal and local officials was the sale of tribal lands. By the time the Restoration Act was passed, the Menominees were broke and embittered by the struggle. Many commentators have blamed termination on Senator Arthur V. Watkins of Utah. While it is true that the Senator was a leading supporter of the program, it is unfair to blame him alone for the disaster that termination became. The actual origins of termination lay within the attitudes of the white majority toward native Americans and their protected status. Since the days of discovery, whites have denigrated Indian culture and have insisted that Indians be assimilated within an alien society. Termination was an inevitable political manifestation of these assimilationist goals. This dissertation utilizes numerous government documents, tribal records, state and federal archives, and material unavailable elsewhere, including information made available by tribal members and Bureau of Indian Affairs' officials. The irony of the termination crisis is that it helped to create a resurgence of interest among Indians in tribal life and culture when it sought to promote assimilation.

1703.   Kamrud, O. N. (1967). A study of school transition problems experienced by Indian students who are residents of Independent School District #25, Ponsford, Minnesota : a research paper  . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, North Dakota State University, Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11189067

1704.   . (1989). J. J. KanassategaThe full faith and credit clause and the American Indian judiciary  .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 41780621. "Submitted to Professor Ralph Johnson, Indian Law Seminar, Law B584, May 1989." Includes bibliographical references.

1705.   Kane, P. (1859). Wanderings of an artist among the Indians of North America from Canada to Vancouver's Island and Oregon, through the Hudson's Bay Company's Territory and back again ... London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans and Roberts.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56), "reprinted, ed. J. W. Garvin, Toronto: The Radisson Society of Canada, 1925."

1706.   Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa Cultural Center. (1991). Old Kahnawake, an oral history of Kahnawake, [from the] photographic  archives [of the] Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa Cultural  Center. Caughnawaga, P. Q., Canada: Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa Cultural  Center [and] Quebec Government Ministry of Cultural  Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Text in English, French and Indian  languages.

1707.   Kantar, A. K. (1988). The Indian series books for boys by Dietrich Lange: a critical study of the application of natural history in fifteen novels published betwen 1912-1930. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.

1708.   Kaplan, A. E. (1955). A study of folksinging in mass society. Sociologus, 5(I), 14-28.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology (1955:I-2757)

1709.   Kaplan, P. A. (1994). When States' American Indian Teacher Preferences In Public Schools Violate Equal Protection Under The Fourteenth Amendment: Krueth v. Independent Sch. Dist. No. 38, Red Lake, Minn., 496 N.W.2d 829 (Minn. App. 1993) review denied, April 20, 1993. Hamline Law Review, 17(3), 477.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

1710.   Kapper, J. (1984). Red Lake Falls, Minnesota : a sociolinguistic survey . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Dakota.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 12626148

1711.   Kapper, J. (1985). Red Lake Falls, Minnesota: A Sociolinguistic Survey. Grand Forks, North Dakota : North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks.
Abstract: Preliminary versions of the papers from the 1985 Summer Institute of Linguistics presented at the University of North Dakota session include: "Referential Distance and Discourse Structure in Yagua" (Thomas E. Payne); "A Note on Ergativity, S', and S'' in Karitiana" (Daniel Everett); "Some Aspects of Zapotecan Clausal Syntax" (Stephen A. Marlett); "Syllable Structure and Aspect Morphology in Isthmus Zapotec" (Stephen A. Marlett and Velma B. Pickett); "Numi Mixtec Syllable Structure and Morphology" (Laura Gittlen and Stephen A. Marlett); "Fortis/Lenis Consonants in Guichicovi Mixe: A Preliminary Acoustic Study" (J. Albert Bickford); "The Inflectional/Derivational Distinction" (David Tuggy); "The Koh Verbal System" (Suellyn H. Glidden); and "Red Lake Falls, Minnesota: A Sociolinguistic Survey" (James Kapper). (MSE)

1712.   . (1904). C. J. Kappler (compiler and editor), Indian Affairs.  Laws and Treaties ...  Washington, D. C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56)

1713.   Indian Treaties, 1778-1883. (1972). reprint of volume 2, Treaties: C. J. Kappler (compiler and editor), Indian Affairs.  Laws and Treaties ... Vol. [volume 2 of original edition]). New York: Interland Pub.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56)

1714.   Kapust, W. H. (1998). Universality in noun classification. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, San Jose State University.
Abstract: It is the purpose of this paper to provide cross-linguistic evidence for the non-arbitrariness in nominal categorization. The lexical organization and the official classification system of six unrelated, areally disparate languages (German, Swahili, Vietnamese, Dyirbal, Ojibwa, Jacaltec) are examined and compared. The findings indicate that the nominal lexicon of all languages in the sample is structured identically. However, a positive correlation between the lexical organization and the respective classificatory system only holds for three of the languages examined (Vietnamese, Jacaltec, German). Based on the evolutionary path of classifying units, it is concluded that noun classification is not arbitrary. It is motivated by cognitive principles of classification and linguistic evolutionary processes. Three focal points of linguistic development are suggested: Lexical, lexico-syntactic, and syntactic. As evidenced by the sample, languages are expected to be at different stages along this path resulting in synchronic cross-linguistic variation.

1715.   Kasiske, B. L., & Chakkera, H. (1998). Successful Renal Transplantation in American Indians. Transplantation, 66(2), 209-214.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The incidence of end-stage renal disease is rapidly growing among American Indians, but there have been no detailed reports of outcomes after renal transplantation in this population. METHODS: We compared the effects of race on risks and outcomes for renal transplants performed at a single center. There were 68 transplants in American Indians, 55 in African-Americans, 32 in Asians, 33 in other races, and 1253 in Caucasians (total = 1441 transplants). RESULTS: American Indian transplant recipients had a high prevalence of risk factors. American Indians were more likely to be diabetic (45.6%) compared with African-Americans (21.8%), Asians (9.4%), other races (15.2%), and Caucasians (25.9%); overall P<0.001. American Indian transplant recipients were more likely to be obese (25.0% had body mass index >30 kg/m2) compared with African-Americans (12.7%), Asians (3.1%), other races (6.1%), and Caucasians (9.7%); overall P<0.01. The percent of patients with peak panel-reactive antibody >50% was higher for American Indian recipients (32.4%) compared with African-Americans (16.4%), Asians (21.9%), other races (27.3%) and Caucasians (15.6%); P<0.01. Despite these differences in risk, there were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of acute rejection, patient survival, or graft survival between American Indians and other racial groups in univariate survival analysis. In a Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for multiple risk factors, graft survival was not different for American Indians (P=0.71), African-Americans (P=0.60), or other races (P=0.34) compared with Caucasians, whereas Asians were only 44% as likely to have graft failure (P=0.07). Patient survival was not different among races. CONCLUSION: Outcomes for renal transplantation are excellent for American Indians, despite a high prevalence of risk factors.  (Abstract by: Author)

1716.   Kasiske, B. L., Rith-Najarian, S., Casper, M. L., & Croft, J. B. (1998). American Indian Heritage and Risk Factors for Renal Injury. Kidney International, 54(4), 1305-1310.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the causes and consequences of renal disease among American Indians in the Great Lakes region of the United States. METHODS: We examined clinical correlates of albumin/creatinine ratios among 1368 participants in the three tribal communities of the Inter-Tribal Heart Project using univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Compared to 1086 participants without albuminuria, the 240 with microalbuminuria (30 to 299 mg/g) and the 42 with macroalbuminuria (>300 mg/g) were more likely to report a history of a myocardial infarction (6.4%, 16.0%, and 23.8%, respectively, P < 0.001). Similarly, compared to patients without albuminuria, those with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria were more likely to report a history of stroke (2.3%, 8.4% and 26.2%, respectively, P < 0.001). In a multiple linear regression model, independent correlates of albumin excretion (P < 0.05) included: fasting blood sugar, treated diabetes, treated hypertension, higher systolic blood pressure, lower diastolic blood pressure, abnormal electrocardiogram, a history of stroke, the degree of American Indian heritage, and lower household income. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary albumin excretion is associated with cardiovascular disease outcomes and risk factors among American Indians of the Great Lakes region. Both heredity and socioeconomic status appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of renal injury in this population.  (Abstract by: Author)

1717.   Katz, P. (1981). Psychotherapy With Native Adolescents. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry - Revue Canadienne De Psychiatrie, 26(7), 455-459.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Psychotherapy with native adolescents requires that the therapist learn about a different set of values, develop new communication skills, and re-examine many of his practices. Varying with the individual tribe, the attitudes to time, property and anger may be significantly different from the values of the white culture. Many of the Indian adolescents rely heavily on non-verbal communication, requiring an increased sensitivity by the therapist to this form of communication. The therapist may need to review his office setting, with an eye to making it less alien, and because of the different attitude to time, he may have to adjust the time structure of his practice, often using more than the fifty-minute hour. Treatment begins with an exploration of Indian-White difficulties, especially the stereotyping of all whites. It then focuses on helping the adolescents to establish their own individual identity, bucking the stereotypes that are projected on them. Examples are given from the author's own practice with Cree and Saulteaux-Ojibway adolescents.  (Abstract by: Author)

1718.   Katz, P. (1979). Saulteaux-Ojibway Adolescents: The Adolescent Process Amidst A Clash Of Cultures. Psychiatric Journal Of The University Of Ottawa, 4(4), 315-321.
Notes: Source: Family Studies Database [University of Minnesota online databases], August 1999 search

1719.   Katzer, B., 1935-. (1972). The Caughnawaga Mohawks : occupations, residence and the maintenance of community  membership . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), Abstracted in Dissertation abstracts  international, v. 33 (1972) no. 5, p. 1903-B. University Microfilms order no. 72-28,057. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1972. Bibliography: leaves 297-306. Microfilm of typescript. Ann Arbor [Mich.] : University  Microfilms, 1972. - 1 reel ; 35 mm.

1720.   Kaufman, A., Brickner, P. W., Varner, R., & Mashburn, W. (1972). Tranquilizer Control. Journal of the American Medical Association, 221, 1504-1506.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: A comprehensive program to reduce the distribution of tranquilizing drugs was established in a clinic serving an American Indian population of 6,000.

1721.   Kay-Raining Bird, E., & Vetter, D. K. (1994). Storytelling in Chippewa-Cree Children. Journal of Speech & Hearing Research, 37(6), 1354-1368.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The structure and content of self-generated narratives were compared for 20 traditional and 20 nontraditional Chippewa-Cree children in four age groups (5, 7, 9, and 11 years). A majority of the stories contained temporally and causally related events and goal-based action. MLT-unit of the narratives was longer and highly structured stories were constructed more frequently with increasing age. The two traditionality groups differed developmentally in their use of obstacles and causally connected episodes. The stories of 11-year-old traditional children were significantly more likely to contain these elements than their 5-year-old counterparts, whereas similar comparisons for nontraditional children revealed no such developmental change. In terms of story content, intrapersonal obstacles were found to be employed by the oldest groups only and were used more frequently by these Chippewa-Cree children than had been previously reported (e.g., Stein, 1988). Several later-developing aspects of story content were identified that seemed to reflect a Cree cultural influence. These results provide evidence for the use of episodic structure by Chippewa-Cree children, but suggest that the developmental course for particular story structure and content can vary as a function of culture.  (Abstract by: Author)

1722.   Kay- Raining Bird, E., & Vetter, D. K. (1994). Storytelling in Chippewa-Cree Children. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 37(6), 1354.
Notes: Source: UnCover

1723.   Kaye, J. D., & Piggott, G. L. (1973). On the cyclical nature of Ojibwa T-palatalization. Linguistic Inquiry, 4(3), 345-362.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIX (1975:78)

1724.   Keating, W. H. (1959). Narrative of the Expedition to the Source of St. Peter's River.  Ross & Haines Old Books Company.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1725.   Keating, W. H. (1824). Narrative of an expedition to the source of St. Peter's River, lake Winnepeek, Lake of the Woods, &c. &c. performed in the year 1823, by order of the Hon. J. C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, under the command of Stephen H. Long, Major, U. S. T. E. Comp.  From the notes of Major Long, Messrs. Say, Keating & Calhoun ... Philadelphia: H. C. Carey and I. Lea.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:56-7), "also later appears later under the title Travels in the Interior of North America ..., 2 vols., London: G. B. Whittaker, 1828]

1726.   Keating, W. H. (1828). Tavels in the Interior of North Amrica ... London: G. B. Whittaker.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:57)

1727.   Keeshig-Tobias, L. (1982). My grandmother is visiting me. Canadian Woman Studies /Les Cahiers De La Femme, 4(1), 8-9.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women's Studies Database], August 29, 1999 search

1728.   Keeshig-Tobias, L. (1988-1989). Reclaiming the Native voice: Interview with Lenore Keeshig-Tobias. Fireweed, 26, 45-52.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women's Studies Database], August 29, 1999 search

1729.   Keeshig-Tobias, L. (1986). Resources For Feminist Research /Documentation Sur La Recherche Feministe [review of  April Raintree (1984) by Beatrice Culleton]. Resources For Feminist Research /Documentation Sur La Recherche Feministe, 15(1), 58.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women's Studies Database], August 29, 1999 search--reviewed by Lenore Keeshig-Tobias in Resources For Feminist Research /Documentation Sur La Recherche Feministe, March 1986

1730.   . (1939). F. M. KeesingThe Menomini Indians of Wisconsin . Philadelphia.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1731.   Keesing, F. M. (1971). Menomini Indians of Wisconsin: A Study of Three Centuries of Cultural Contact & Changes.  Johnson Reprint Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1732.   Kehoe, A. B. (1994). The Ojibwa of Berens River, Manitoba - Ethnography Into History - Hallowell, A. I. Ethnohistory, 41(2), 349-351.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1733.   Keiser, A. (1922). The work among the Chippewas in Michigan and Minnesota. in Lutheran Mission work among the American Indians  (pp. 55-94). Minneapolis, MN: Aubsburg Publishing House.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:57)

1734.   Keller Jr., R. J. (1972). On teaching Indian history: legal jurisdiction in Chippewa treaties. Ethnohistory, 19(3), 209-218.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XX (1976:66)

1735.   Keller, R. The Treaty of Eighteen Forty-Two Between the United States & the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi & Lake Superior.  Institute for the Development of Indian Law.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1736.   Keller, R. The Treaty of Eighteen Thirty-Six Between the Ottawa & Chippewa Nations of Indians & the U. S. Government.  Institute for the Development of Indian Law.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1737.   Keller, R. H. (1989). America's Native Sweet: Chippewa Treaties and the Right to Harvest Maple Sugar. American Indian Quarterly., 13(2), 117-135.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1738.   Kelly, A. C. M. (1986). Marriage record of Caughnawaga Reformed  Church, Fonda, New York : now the Reformed Church of Fonda, 1772-1899 . Rhinebeck, N.Y.  A.C.M. Kelly.
Notes: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search).  Includes indexes.  Caughnawaga Reformed Church (Fonda,  N.Y.)

1739.   Kelton, D. H. (1920). Indian names and history of the Sault Ste. Marie Canal ... Detroit, MI: Detroit Free Press Printing.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:57)

1740.   . (1888). D. H. KeltonIndian names of places near the Great Lakes  Vol. I). Detroit: Detroit Free Press Printing.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:57)

1741.   Kennedy, M. A. (1998). The Whiskey Trade of the Northwestern Plains: A Multidisciplinary Study.  Peter Lang Publishing, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1742.   Kennedy, T. J. (1993). The origins of Creek Indian nationalism: contact, diplomacy, clans and intermarriage during the colonial and early national periods. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Houston.
Abstract: From their earliest contacts, English settlers in North America attempted to establish close diplomatic relations with the Indians. In the eighteenth-century, colonial South the English enjoyed some success when they employed Scots traders as diplomats. Since Scotsmen were from a clan-based society similar to that of the Indians, they quickly adapted to Indian life. Scots-Indian intermarriage created an English metis community whose members were steeped both in British common law and custom, and in Indian matrilineal culture. After the Revolution, the Anglo-American tendency to treat Indians to the full rigor of the law and to assume that they were members of true nations, created a concept of Indian nationalism, which was most effectively projected by the adroit Creek Indian diplomat, Alexander McGillivray. McGillivray's extraordinary legal intelligence and diplomatic finesse created a genuine and viable nationalism among the Creek elites. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)

1743.   Kermoal, N. J. (1997). Le temps de Cayoge: la vie quotidienne des femmes metisses au Manitoba de 1850 a 1900 (French text, daily life, women). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada).
Abstract: Si les nombreuses etudes sur l'histoire des Metis ont souligne que la disparition de la traite des peaux de bisons et les evenements de 1870 a la Riviere-Rouge avaient bouscule l'organisation de la societe, aucune ne pose la question de savoir de quelle maniere les femmes ont ete touchees par ces bouleversements, conment elles se sont adaptees a la nouvelle situation, et si elles ont trouve de nouvelles formes de legitimation de leurs roles. En ce qui a trait au cadre de vie quotidien des femmes metisses de souche francophone, on s'apercoit qu'il a enormemenent change au cours des annees 1850-1900. Dans les annees 1850 jusqu'a la disparition du bison, la nature offrait une plethore de produits necessaires a la survie. Les Metis dependaient de cette natue pour la fabrication de leurs moyens de transport, la construction de leurs maisons et pour la confection des vetements. L'arrivee de nouveaux habitants dans les annees 1870 et 1880 suscita l'importation de nouvelles technologies. Les maisons se moderniserent peu a peu et l'ameublement se diversifia. Les femmes furent particulierement touchees par ces changements puisqu'ils ne concernerent pas seulement la structure des maisons, mais aussi l'ameublement. Elles durent apprendre a cuisiner sur un fourneau plutot que dans une cheminee et la confection des vetements fut facilitee par l'introduction de la machine a coudre dans certains foyers. Certaines coutumes disparaissent pour laisser place a des pratiques culturelles qui rapprochent les experiences quoddiennes des Metisses a celles des autres femmes, comme dans le domaine de la sante. Jusqu'a l'invasion de maladies contagieuses vehiculees par les nouveaux arrivants, les Metisses jouaient un role fondamental dans les communautes car elles s'occupaient de la sante des familles en faisant appel a un savoir medical herite de leurs ancetres autochtones. A partir des annees 1870, la confiance face aux remedes naturels diminue constamment car les femmes ne connaissent pas de cures pour assurer d'eventuelles guerisons contre la diphterie, la fievre typhoide ou la tuberculose. La gravite des maladies, l'influence du clerge et des Canadiens-francais les poussent, elles et leurs enfants, a venir se faire soigner a l'hopital. L'etude des registres des hopitaux de Saint-Boniface et de Saint-Roch revele que les femmes etaient plus nombreuses que les hommes a venir se faire soigner dans les institutions des Soeurs Grises. Mais l'element revelateur de notre etude de ces registres, est que des les annees 1870, la tuberculose prime sur les autres maladies. Cette tendance, qui ne fera que s'accentuer avec les annees, souligne deja l'emergence d'un probleme specifique aux conditions de vie des nations autochtones et metisses du Canada. En ce qui a trait au statut economique des femmes, il s'est peu a peu deteriore au cours de la periode etudiee. Dans les annees 1850, les preoccupations feminines depassaient les limites du foyer car elles etaient essentielles au depecage et au decoupage de la viande de bison et a la preparation du. Leurs activites etaient centrales a la bonne marche de l'entreprise et leur expertise grandement appreciee, car sans elles, la traite des peaux de bisons n'aurait pas existee. Apres la disparition de cet animal, les activites des Metisses se sont concentrees principalement autour de la maison. Comme le montre notre etude, le role economique des femmes n'en reste pas moins indispensable.  (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

1744.   . (1990). F. R. Kestler, 1929-The Indian captivity narrative : a woman's view  . New York : Garland Pub.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 20318506
Abstract: Includes bibliographical references (p. 557- 576) and index. The seventeenth century : two brave ladies -- King Philip's War -- Mary White Rowlandson : background -- The narrative of the captivity and restoration of Mrs. Mary White Rowlandson -- Editions of Mary Rowlandson's Narrative -- England versus France and the Indians -- Hannah Duston : background -- Cotton Mather's Dux femina facti -- Hawthorne's The Duston family -- Thoreau : A week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers -- Caverly's Heroism of Hannah Duston -- Fiedler's Return of the vanishing American -- The eighteenth century -- Mary Jemison : background -- Howard Peckham's Golden haired Seneca -- Lois Lenski's Indian captive -- James Seaver's The life of Mary Jemison -- Jemima Howe : background -- Samuel Drake's A particular account of the captivity of Mrs. Jemima Howe -- John Frost's Mrs. Howe -- Susannah Willard Johnson : background -- Horace Bailey's A narrative of the captivity of Mrs. Johnson -- End of the eighteenth century -- The Hall sisters : background -- Narrative : 1832 version -- Elmer Baldwin's History of La Salle County -- Frances Slocum : background -- John Meginness' Biography of Frances Slocum -- The Comanches - - Sarah Ann Horn : background -- E. House's edition : Captivity of Mrs. Horn -- Cynthia Ann Parker : background -- James DeShields' Cynthia Ann Parker, the story of her capture -- Howard Peckham's Comanche captives -- The Civil War (1861- 1865) -- The Apaches -- Olive Oatman : background -- Captivity of the Oatman girls -- The Sioux Indians -- Miss Abigal Gardiner : background -- Lee's History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! -- Mrs. J.E. De Camp Sweet : background -- Mrs. J.E. De Camp Sweet's narrative of her captivity in the Sioux outbreak of 1862 -- Mary Schwandt-Schmidt : background - - The story of Mary Schwandt -- Nancy McClure-Faribault- Huggan : background -- The story of Nancy M'Clure -- Fanny Kelly : background -- Narrative of my captivity among the Sioux Indians -- Sarah L. Larimer The capture and escape : or, Life among the Sioux -- The Cheyennes -- The German sisters : background -- Girl captives of the Cheyennes -- The Winnebagoes -- Emeline L. Fuller : background -- Left by the Indians : the story of my life -- The Utes : final outbreak -- Josephine Meeker : background -- The Ute Massacre! : brave Miss Meeker's captivity! -- Submission of the Red Man -- Value of the captivity narrative.

1745.   Ketcham, W. H. (1920). The Chippewa missions of Minnesota. The Indian Sentinel, 2, 161-4.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:57)

1746.   Key, W. B. (1974). Subliminal Seduction, ad media's manipulaiton of a not so innocent America.  Signet Classics.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

1747.   Kidwell, C. S. (1978). The Power of Women in Three American Indian Societies. Journal Of Ethnic Studies , 6(3), 113-121.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women, Race & Ethnicity Database], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: Kidwell examines women's access to power in traditional Ojibwa, Winnebago, and Menominee cultures.

1748.   (1926). [Audiovisual]. M. P. Killy, 1910- .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30798002
Abstract: Photographed and compiled by Monroe P. Killy, includes a few photographs by Albert Rich. Views of Ojibway Indians on northern Minnesota Indian reservations, including Mille Lacs, Nett Lake, Leech Lake, White Earth, Grant Portage, Red Lake and White Earth. Shows a maple sugar camp, various Indian crafts, birch bark canoe construction, wild ricing, games and ceremonies, including participation in the 1933 Schoolcraft pageant and the Minnesota Territoral Centennial pageant at Lake Itasca. Also includes views of Indian sites in North and South Dakota, Dakota Indians at Prairie Island, Minn. and copies of artwork by George Catlin.

1749.   Kilroe, P. (1991). Spatial-marking affixes and the expression of time in Ojibwa. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 22, 193-202.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1750.   Kindscher, K., & Hurlburt, D. P. (1998). Huron Smith's Ethnobotany of the Hocak (Winnebago). Economic Botany , 52(4), 352-372.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Abstract: The Hocak, commonly known as the Winnebago, are one of the original tribes in the present state of Wisconsin. The field notes of Huron Smith, compiled in the late 1920s and early 1930s, document the extensive use of plant materials by Hocak people. Smith's notes contain references to 199 vascular plant species in 74 families, with recorded uses for 153 of these species. Medicinal plants (with 117 species) comprise the largest category, followed by food (37 species), and fiber and material uses (22 species). Smith's work is unique for its time because he thoroughly explored the tribal uses of the plants in addition to collecting voucher specimens and photographic plates, and because it remains the most extensive Hocak ethnobotanical study. Added to Smith's other works of tribes in Wisconsin (Menominee, Meskwaki, Ojibwe and Potawatomi), the Hocak ethnobotany broadens the cultural base of his regional compilation of Native North American plant uses. In addition, this is an important body of information for the Hocak people and those interested in their use of plants.

1751.   . (1979). N. King, & L. AgardReminiscences of Nina King, Red Lake band of Chippewa, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22906309

1752.   King, R. M. (1989). Assessment of the Native American treaty spear fishery in northwestern Wisconsin : a DJ report for the Cumberland area . Wisconsin?
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

1753.   (1973). Kingbird Family Singers. Phoenix, AZ: Canyon Records.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:39)
Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 74760822. Performed by the Kingbird Singers of Ponemah, Minn. Notes by T. Vennum, Jr. on slipcase.

1754.   Kingsbury, D. L. (1898). The United States government publications . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's ! northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

1755.   Map of Minnesota and Dakota : showing the route of the Northwestern Indian Expedition of 1864 . (1864). United States .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7498642

1756.   Kingsbury, D. L. (1898). Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

1757.   Kinietz, W. V. (1965). Indians of the Western Great Lakes, 1615-1760.  University of Michigan Press.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1758.   Kinietz, W. V. (1965). Indians of the Western Great Lakes Region.  University of Michigan Press.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1759.   . (1947). W. V. KinietzChippewa Village: The Story of Katikitegon . Bloomfield Hills, MI: Cranbook Press.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 2, item 14
Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:58), citing the publisher as "Cranbook Institute of Science" and the bulletin number as "25"

1760.   . (1940). W. V. KinietzThe Indian Tribes of the Western Great Lakes . Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:58)

1761.   Kiniew, K. A. (1995). Manito Gitgaan governing the great spirits garden: wild rice in Treaty Number 3.  An example of indigenous government public policy making and intergovernmental relations between the boundary waters Anishinaabeg and the Crown, 1869-1994 (Ontario, Manitoba). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Abstract: This thesis offers an example of indigenous government public policy making and intergovernmental relations between the Boundary Waters Anishinaabeg and the Crown, from the mid nineteenth to late twentieth centuries. The case of Manomin (wild rice) in the Treaty #3 Boundary Waters territory (at the juncture of Ontario, Manitoba and Minnesota) is examined as a symbol of the constitutional conflict between Crown and Anishinaabe governments: is wild rice a natural resource owned by the Crown or a gift from the Creator given to the Anishinaabe? Secondly, the history of wild rice and the Anishinaabe science and system of management is the story of one of longest continuing forms of indigenous self-government in Canada. Thirdly, manomin stands as a metaphor for the struggles of the Anishinaabe peoples in asserting their treaty and aboriginal rights, through years of suppression. An organic model of the suppression and expression of aboriginal, treaty and Anishinaabe rights is presented. The study draws from data collected from archival and government files from 1860s to 1980s, as well as interviews of Anishinaabe leaders, Elders, rice harvesters and business people, Crown government negotiators, and the insight of a key informant. This is an interdisciplinary study, drawing upon the methodology and frameworks offered by Anthropology, Political Studies, Native Studies and Law.

1762.   Kirkby, W. W. (William West), 1827-1907. (1880). Manual of devotion in the Beaver Indian  dialect compiled from the manuals of the Venerable Archdeacon Kirkby  . London: [So]ciety for Promoting Christian  Knowledge.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Bompas, William Carpenter, 1834- 1906.

1763.   Kirkham, E. K.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

1764.   Kirkham, E. K. (1980). The native American : records that establish individual and family identity. [Salt Lake City?]: Corporation of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saijnts.
Notes: At head of title: World Conference on records ; preserving our heritage, August 12-15, 1980. "Series 302." Includes bibliography.
Other: World Conference on Records (1980 : Salt Lake City, Utah) Preserving our heritage.

1765.   Kirkham, E. K. Our Native Americans and their Records of Genealogical Value. Logan, UT: Everton Publishers, Inc.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

1766.   Klassen, H. M. (1997). The development of resiliency in American Indian adolescents (Native Americans. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Harvard University (advised by Janine Bempechat).
Abstract: Resiliency in an adolescent refers to successful social and psychological adaptation despite risk and adversity (Masten, 1994).   It is the capacity to recover from disappointment, obstacle, or setback (Demos, 1989). While the research literature reveals that  many Native American youth experience difficulties in coping effectively with stress, there exists an unstudied group of American  Indian adolescents who thrive under adversity. In examining the  process by which resiliency develops in the life of resilient American Indian adolescents, this thesis focuses on the following research questions: (1) By what social and psychological process does  resiliency develop in the life of eight Chippewa Indian adolescents? (2) What role does the extended family system, individual attributes, and culture play, if any, in fostering resiliency in these eight adolescents? (3) What implications does this research present for educational practices, intervention strategies, and future research?  The data were collected during a five week educational program designed to enhance leadership and educational skills in Native American youth. The qualitative case study methods used were clinical interviews, participant observations, and document analysis of such materials as school records. The findings of this study suggest that biculturalism, a positive tribal identity, and a supportive extended family system place the adolescent on a positive developmental trajectory that fosters a positive outcome. In addition, resilient American Indian adolescents tend to develop a resilient perspective in the aftermath of a significant loss, to maintain supportive relationships, to use insight in understanding how to cope with pathology, and to be self-reliant when facing obstacles. Taken  together these cultural and individual attributes form a model that explains the development of resiliency in American Indian adolescents. Educational implications for this research include the importance of developing a positive and long term relationship with the American Indian student while incorporating culturally relevant teaching methods and materials within the curriculum. Suggestions for future research include a prospective longitudinal study, a replication of the study with different American Indian tribes and larger numbers, and a study that examines the development of resiliency in adolescents who drop-out of the educational system.

1767.   . (1994). T. L. Klein, & United States. Geological Survey Geochemical analyses of bedrock samples from drill holes on and near Red Lake Indian Reservation lands, northern Minnesota . Reston, Va.? : Denver, Colo: U.S. Geological Survey ; Books and Open- File Reports Section, distributor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 33118523.  Cover title. ... accession: 30799493. Chiefly tables. Includes bibliographical references (leaf 2)

1768.   . (1994). T. L. Klein, & United States. Geological SurveyGraphic lithologic and alteration logs from diamond drill holes on and near the Red Lake Indian Reservation lands in the International Falls, Roseau, and Bimidji 10 x 20 quadrangles, northern Minnesota  . [Reston, VA] : [Denver, Colo. ]: U.S. Geological Survey ; Open-File Reports Section, distributor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30991744.  Imprint from transmittal sheet. Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 3-4). ... accession: 33217709

1769.   . (1994). T. L. Klein, & United States. Geological SurveyTabulated geochemistry and assays of bedrock samples from mineral exploration drill holes on and near Red Lake Indian Reservation lands, northern Minnesota  . Reston, Va. .? : Denver, Colo.  U.S. Geological Survey ; Books and Open- File Reports Section, distributor .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30785821. Cover title. Chiefly tables. ... accession: 33118519

1770.   Knight, Y. T., & Preloznik, J. F. (1973). The Menominee Restoration Act 93rd Congress, 1st Session, H.R. 7421 and S. 1687 : legal analysis . Boulder, Colo.  Native American Rights Fund.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

1771.   Knuth, H. E. (1974). Economic and historical background of Northeastern Minnesota lands ceded by Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior September 30, 1854, Royce Area 332, for valuation as of January 10, 1855 (date of ratification) ... in D. A. Horr (editor and compiler), Chippewa Indians III  (pp. 181-295). New York: Garland Press.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:45-6, 50, 58)

1772.   Koenig, D. M. (1981). Cognitive styles of Indian, Metis, Inuit and non-natives of northern Canada and Alaska and implications for education. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Saskatchewan (Canada).
Abstract: The present study investigated the cognitive styles of Indian, Metis, Inuit and non-native adults and adolescents of northern Canada and Alaska. The study identified three relational and two analytical cognitive styles. The styles differed significantly from each other in relation to cultural background, language facility, level of post-secondary education, sex and age of the respondents. Cultural background was found to be the most significant discriminator of those under investigation. Procedure of the study involved the collection of verbalized responses to five open-ended questions concerning education from one hundred northern residents. A total of 528 minutes 32 seconds of tape-recorded responses was available from twenty treaty and status Indians, twenty Metis, twenty Inuit and forty non-natives. Subjects included parents, university students, high school students, teacher trainees, teachers, education administrators, native politicians and general community members. The data were submitted to content analysis procedures with items coded according to the Data Analysis of Cognitive Style (DACS) Scale which had been adapted for use in the present study from the work of E. S. Schneidman (1966). Scale item frequencies for each respondent were tabulated and submitted for statistical analyses to the SPSS program discriminant analysis. This analysis identified significantly different functions which translated into patterns of thinking or cognitive styles. In addition this analysis identified the relative importance of functions as discriminators among group and computed predictability scores which showed the percentage of respondents who were correctly classified according to cognitive styles and demographic variables. Findings of this study must be considered in relation to the following limitations: the size and nature of the stratified random sample; the reliability of the coders; the use of the unvalidated DACS scale; the ability of the analytical procedures to correctly discriminate among the study groups. The study found that the groups which tended to think in relational styles were: Natives (Indian, Metis, Inuit), people with no university education or with less than one year at university; bilinguals (English and a native language); males; people under twenty years and over forty years of age. The terms Conflict-relational, Moral-relational and Inexact-relational were used to more precisely identify differing cognitive behaviors within the overall relational category. The groups which were found to exhibit analytical cognitive style behaviors included: the non-native group; those respondents with two to four years of university education; and respondents between thirty and forty years of age. Subcategories within analytical styles were Conflict-analytical and Inexact-analytical. When the Indian, Metis and Inuit respondents were combined into a 'native' cultural group they strongly identified with the Moral-relational cognitive style (people-oriented, subjective, holistic, concerned with morals and ethics). The non-native group showed a strong negative relationship to this style. However, when each cultural group was analyzed separately, it was found that the Indian and Inuit subjects were somewhat more analytical (objective, linear, field-independent) than the Metis but less so than the non-natives. On the analysis of four groups, the non-natives were found to relate to both relational and analytical styles of thinking, indicating a wide range of differences within the group. It was concluded that significant differences existed in the cognitive styles preferred by respondents of different cultural, language, education, sex and age groups in this study. Cultural background was found to be the strongest discriminator in relation to cognitive style differences. It was further concluded that according to extrapolation of findings to the theoretical model it may be possible and desirable to modify curricula content and teaching techniques to achieve a closer match between teaching styles and cognitive and learning styles of students of indigenous cultural backgrounds.

1773.   Kohl, J. G. (1860). Kitchi-Gami. London: Chapman and Hall.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 2, item 20
Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1774.   . (1985). J. G. KohlKitchi-Gami: life among the Lake Superior Ojibway . St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Translation of: Kitschi-Gami. Originally published: London : Chapman and Hall, 1860. Includes index.

1775.   . (1860). J. G. KohlKitchi-Gami.  Wanderings around Lake Superior ...  London: Chapman and Hall.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:58), "Wraxall omited considerable information.  For a complete account of these travels, see Koh'ls Kitchi-Gami; oder, Erzälungen von Obern See.  Ein Beitrag Zur Charakteristic der amerikanischen Indianer ... 2 vols. in 1, Bremen: C. Schüneman, 1859."

1776.   Kohl, J. G. (1956). Kitchi-Gami: wanderings around Lake Superior. Minneapolis: Ross & Haines.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. III (1959:3-2032)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"

1777.   . (1859). J. G. KohlKitschi-Gami: oder Erzählungen vom Obern See.  Ein Beitrag Zur Charakteristik der amerikanishchen Indianer ...  Bremen: C. Schünemann.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:58)

1778.   Kolar, J. C. (1984). Hungry Hall and late woodland populations of the upper Great Lakes. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada).
Abstract: Hungry Hall is a Late Woodland Blackduck burial mound site in northwest Ontario. Excavated in 1959 and 1969, the skeletal material from the site has remained unanalyzed except for an unpublished manuscript describing the remains from Mound II. The thesis has three purposes. In addition to the description of the skeletal biology of the Mound I collection, the hypothesis that lower and upper Mound I represent different populations is examined. The third purpose is to evaluate the hypothesis that Blackduck represents more than one population with biological affinities to different historic Plains tribes, as well as suggestions that skeletal populations over a wide geographic range from the Upper Great Lakes to Manitoba form a single 'Northern Woodlands' population.  Data regarding the problem of whether Mound I represents a single population are equivocal. Radiocarbon dates suggest that upper Mound I and Mound II are very close temporally. There are no radiocarbon dates for lower Mound I. Cultural data, in the form of ceramics and burial practices, indicate a consistent pattern throughout the Hungry Hall mounds which could indicate a single population. Biological data also are equivocal. The biological affinities of lower and upper Mound I are slightly different, though both appear closely related to Mound II. The differences could reflect statistical error due to small sample size. The comparative analysis employs cranial non-metric data from Late Woodland sites in Ontario, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Manitoba, as well as data from historic Plains tribes. The statistic used is Smith's Measure of Divergence (MD) with the Freeman-Tukey inverse sine transformation of trait frequencies. Comparative analysis indicates that Mound I is closely related to Mille Lacs, north Arvilla and north Blackduck and distinct from south Blackduck. Together with north Arvilla and north Blackduck, Mound I appears related to the historic Cheyenne. South Blackduck is ancestral Dakota. The data support the hypothesis of the dual nature of the Blackduck peoples.  Evidence for a 'Northern Woodlands' population is not apparent from the non-metric comparisons. The skeletal populations from Minnesota, Ontario, and the Plains periphery differ significantly from those in Michigan and northern Wisconsin.

1779.   Konrad, H. (1997). The Ojibwa of Western Canada - Peers, L. Journal of the West, 36(2), 109-110.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

1780.   Koolage Jr., W. W. (1975). Conceptual negativism in Chipewyan ethnology. Anthropologica, 17(1), 45-60.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXI (1978:173)

1781.   Kosova, W. (1990). Race Baiting: Every spring Wisconsin's Chippewa exercise their ancestral right to spearfish, and do battle with angry rednecks. The New Republic, 202(24), 16.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1782.   Krippner, S. (1980). A suggested typology of folk healing and its relevance for parapsychological investigation. Journal for the Society for Psychical Research, 50(786), 491-500.  51 refs.
Notes: Source: Parapsychology Abstracts International, Dec 1986:18
Abstract: The author presents an outline of folk healing in which the following types of healers are distinguished: shamanic, spiritist, esoteric, religious ritual, and intuitive healers.  Persons usually classified as psychic healers were placed in the latter category.  In addition to providing expamples of each type of healer with references to relevant literautere, Krippner discusses the possible interlay of psi phenomena, particularly PK, with ostensible psychic healing.  Finally, the author draws some suggestions for PK experimentation from his discussion. -N.L.Z.

1783.   Krips, H. (1997). Fetishes and the native subject. Boundary 2, 24(1), 113 (24).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: An analysis of a Hopi initiation ritual, totemism among the Ojibwa and Algonquin tribes, and the Greek Oedipus myth, illustrate Freudian concepts of fetishism. The discussed examples all involve the disavowal of a reality in an effort to maintain a myth. Hopi gods, Ojibwa totems, and Oedipal desires represent conscious denials of facts in an effort to preserve the power of a myth or object.

1784.   Krist, F. J. Jr., & Brown, D. G. (1994). GIS Modeling of Paleo-Indian Period Caribou Migrations and Viewsheds in Northeastern Lower Michigan. PE&RS : Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing, 60(9), 1129.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Spatial relationships between viewsheds from three archaeological sites and the simulated pathways indicated that these sites were suitable locations for hunting caribou during theEarly Holocene.

1785.   Kroeber, A. L. (1939). Cultural and natural areas of Native North America. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1786.   Kroska, R. C. A. (1966). Comparative physical growth study of Minnesota white and Indian children age 6 through 12 years: appraisan of leanness-fatness. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota, Photocopy of typescript. Ann Arbor, Mich. : Xerox University Microfilms, 1976. 21 cm.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 5462683

1787.   Krumm, B. L. (1997). Leadership roles of American Indian women tribal college presidents (women administrators). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Nebraska--Lincoln.
Abstract: Examining the experiences of four American Indian women tribal college presidents and how they perceived their leadership roles was the purpose of the study. Questions focused on the leadership roles, the presidents' visions for their colleges, behaviors and strategies they used, and their perceptions and insights on leadership. The four participants in the multi-case study were: Janine Pease Windy Boy Pretty on Top, founding president of Little Big Horn Community College, Crow Agency, Montana; Verna Fowler, founding president of College of the Menominee Nation, Keshena, Wisconsin; Tanya Ward, president of Cheyenne River Community College, Eagle Butte, South Dakota; and Margarett Campbell, former president of Fort Belknap College, Harlem, Montana. Multiple sources provided information for the study; participant interviews conducted on-site and telephone interviews provided the primary data. Tribal colleges have a common mission of restoring and preserving tribal culture and language; culture defines the purpose, process, and product. Existing leadership theories may not provide the framework to contextualize tribal college leadership; however, if culture is viewed as an aspect of the context, environment, or situation, then the leadership of the four participants may approximate situational leadership. Although the women in this study preferred to use a participative style of leadership--high in supportiveness and low in directiveness--the situations often demanded a more highly directive leadership style. Completing the task took priority in determining the appropriate decision-making process. Participants identified finances and politics as their primary concerns, as well as achieving and maintaining accreditation. The women in this study held differing perceptions of the influence gender had on leadership. The tribes of the participants did not appear to create barriers that prevented women from assuming leadership positions; leadership in education is congruent with the role of woman as care giver and nurturer. Tribal college leadership is the embodiment of a lifestyle, an expression of learned patterns of thought and behaviors, values and beliefs. Tribal college leadership is inseparable from culture. The value of this study is that it gives voice to the participants, enabling them to tell their stories in their own words. The study also provides information that is beneficial in creating a bridge of understanding between cultures.

1788.   Krupat, K. (1991). Native American autobiography and the synecdochic self . in American autobiography : retrospect and prospect  . Madison, Wis.  University of Wisconsin Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: Includes bibliographical references and index. Introduction / Paul John Eakin -- [Part I. Four centuries of American autobiography] -- The prehistory of American autobiography / Daniel B. Shea -- Autobiography in the American Renaissance / Lawrence Buell -- 'Self'-conscious history : American autobiography after the Civil War / Susanna Egan -- Modern American autobiography : texts and transactions / Albert E. Stone -- [Part II. Varieties of American autobiography] -- The making of ethnic autobiography in the United States / William Boelhower -- Immigrant autobiography : some questions of definition and approach / Sau-ling Cynthia Wong -- Native American autobiography and the synecdochic self / Arnold Krupat -- African-American autobiography criticism : retrospect and prospect / William L. Andrews -- Nineteenth-century autobiographies of affiliation : the case of Catharine Sedgwick and Lucy Larcom / Carol Holly -- Speaking her own piece : Emma Goldman and the discursive skeins of autobiography / Blanche H. Gelfant -- The way we work / Jane Hallowell Coles and Robert Coles.

1789.   Kudalis, E. (1996). Circle of life: a school addition and renovation finds inspiration in traditional American Indian imagery. Architecture Minnesota, 22(5), 26-29.
Notes: Source: U of M architecture bibliographic database (October, 1999 search). 
Abstract: Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe School near Hayward, Wisc. Architects: Dovolis

1790.   Kudalis, E. (1997). Tribal union. Architecture Minnesota, 23(1), 28-29.
Notes: Source: U of M architecture bibliographic database (October, 1999 search). 
Abstract: Grand Portage Community Center in Grand Portage, Minn., which serves the
Chippewa tribe. Architects: Damberg, Scott, Peck & Booker

1791.   Kuehnle, W. R. (1966). Appraisal of Royce area 242 in the states of Wisconsin and Minnesota : ceded to the United States by Minnesota Chippewa Indians, et al. Valuation date: June 11, 1838. Docket no. 18-C before the Indian Claims Commission . Chicago : W.R. Kuehnle.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 17963958. Other: United States. Dept. of Justice.

1792.   Kugel, R. (1998). An Annotated Listing of Ojibwa Chiefs, 1690-1890. American Indian Culture & Research Journal, 22(3), 227-230.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

1793.   Kugel, R. (1987). Factional alignment among the Minnesota Ojibwe, 1850-1880. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 9(4), 23-47.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1794.   Kugel, R. (1994). Of Missionaries and Their Cattle - Ojibwa Perceptions of a Missionary as Evil Shaman. Ethnohistory : the Bulletin of the Ohio Valley ..., 41(2), 227-244.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search
Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: In the 1830s, the Ojibwa of Fond du Lac first encountered Euro-American missionaries. The relationship quickly became strained by missionary assaults on Ojibwa culture. Puzzled by the missionaries' contradictory actions, the Ojibwa concluded that the missionaries were spiritually powerful but malevolent. Striking confirmation of missionary witchcraft occurred when an Ojibwa was charged by a missionary's cow. The article further examines Ojibwa attitudes toward domestic cattle and the ways Ojibwa perceptions of missionaries and cattle reinforced one another. [References: 134]

1795.   Kugel, R. (1990). Religion Mixed with Politics: The 1836 Conversion of Mang'osid of Fond du Lac El. Ethnohistory : the Bulletin of the Ohio Valley, 37(2), 126-157.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1796.   Kugel, R. (1998). To Be the Main Leaders of Our People: A History of Minnesota Ojibwe Politics, 1825-1898.  Michigan State University Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1797.   Kugel, R. A. (1986). 'To go about the earth': an ethnohistory of the Minnesota Ojibwe; 1830-1900. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles.

1798.   Kuhlmann, A. (1999). Bingo, Blackjack, and one-armed bandits in the northwoods: a sociology of American Indian gaming in the United States (Ho Chunk, Wisconsin, casinos, gambling). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Kansas.
Abstract: This dissertation analyzes Indian gaming and the surrounding issues on the national, state, and tribal levels. It examines Indian-White relations with special attention to its history and the contemporary role of self-determination legislation, originally passed in the 1970s, and related litigation in regard to gaming. Since states vary in the manner in which they address the issue, Wisconsin, where the researcher resides, was chosen as a case study. Similarly, Indian tribes differ greatly in the manner in which they deal with gaming, so the Ho-Chunk Tribe of Wisconsin was selected as a case study. The research for this dissertation relies on library research, telephone interviews with each of the Wisconsin tribes, and interviews with tribal members and tribal and non-tribal employees of the Ho-Chunk Casino. The telephone interviews are designed to understand the diversity of Indian gaming, the goals, and problems from the perspective of the tribes involved. The interviews with Ho-Chunks and casino employees focus on clarifying the structure of the casinos and the impact of gaming on the culture, economy, and politics of the tribe. The dissertation argues that the controversy over Indian gaming is not primarily over Indian casinos. Instead, it is the arena in which states are trying to push back the political and legal gains tribes made in the 1970s. In this arena the conflict between states and tribes over political control of Indian resources, land, and people is carried out. This means that on the state level historical forces continue to operate while the position and attitudes of tribes have changed. This study further shows that on the tribal level gaming has led to significant population increases but also an intensification of tensions between tribal factions. The tribe continues to have problems with identifying new needs and goals and developing appropriate management strategies and business plans in a short amount of time. The ensuing intratribal controversies can be understood as conflicts over acculturation and cultural maintenance.

1799.   Kuhm, H. W. (1952). Indian place names in Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Archaeologist, 33, 1-157.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59)

1800.   Kullen, D. (1994). Comstock Trace: a Huber phase earthwork and habitation site near Joliet, Will County, Illinois. MCJA: Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology, 19(1), 3-38.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1801.   Kunitz, S. J. (1976). A Survey of Fertility Histories and Contraceptive Use Among a Group of Navajo Women. Lake Powell Research Project Bulletin , (No. 21), 83p.
Notes: ERIC NO: ED139554
Abstract: In an effort to determine female Navajo fertility histories, patterns of contraceptive use, educational levels, residence patterns, and modes of communication re: family planning, a five-part questionnaire (personal data, marital history, pregnancy history, knowledge of contraception, and comments on family planning) was administered to 42 women in LeChee, 34 in Red Lake, and 63 in South Tuba (the northwestern portion of the Navajo Reservation). Respondents were 18 years of age or older and they did not constitute a randomized sample. Results indicated: fertility had been and continued to be high, having fluctuated in the past with economic conditions but gradually declining; peak fertility was lower and occurred at younger ages than in the past; contraceptive use was as common among young women with few children as it was among older women with many children; desired family size among young women was declining but was still large; communication about the use of contraception appeared to be limited among women and between spouses (there was evidence of correlation between residence patterns and discussion of contraception)//the majority favored improvement of existing family planning programs; older women felt family planning should be used primarily in the case of health jeopardy; younger women wanted more and better information than is currently available. (JC)

1802.   Kurath, G. P. (1954). Chippewa sacred songs in religious metamorphosis. Scientific Monthly, 79, 311-317.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59)

1803.   Kurath, G. P. (1966). Michigan Indian festivals. Ann Arbor, MI: Ann Arbor Pub.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59)

1804.   Kurtzke, J. F., Beebe, G. W., & Norman, J. E., Jr. (1979). Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Usa Veterans: 1. Race, Sex and Geographic Distribution. Neurology, 29(9 Part 1), 1228-1235.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: World War II and Korean conflict veterans (5305) who are compensated by the Veterans Administration for multiple sclerosis (MS) were matched to controls based on age, date of entry into military service and branch of service. Case/control ratios for white males, white females and black males were 1.04, 1.86 and 0.45, respectively. The coterminous 48 states, divided into 3 tiers based on latitude, exhibited the well-known north-south gradient in risk. For all races and both sexes, case/control ratios were 1.41, 1.00 and 0.53 for the north, middle and south tiers. Both white females and black males showed this same north-to-south variation in risk. The case/control ratio for males of races other than black or white was 0.23, with possible deficits in risk for American Indians and Japanese-Americans. Filipinos and Hawaiian Japanese were significantly low-risk groups. A racial and possibly a genetic predisposition, and a geographically determined differential exposure to an environmental agent, are apparently related to the risk of MS.

1805.   Kurzweil, E. (1980). The age of structuralism: Lévi-Strauss to Foucault. New York: Columbia University Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1806.   Kushner. (1984). Chippewa: Caravan for the Young Child.  Nazarene Publishing House.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1807.   Kutch, J. M., Jr. , & Schmit, S. (1988). Staff at Red Lake Hospital Designed, Implemented, and Evaluated a Staff Training Program on Aids [Letter]. Military Medicine, 153(12), 650-1.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1808.   Kvigne, V. L., Bull, L. B., Welty, T. K., Leonardson, G. R., & Lacina, L. (1998). Relationship of Prenatal Alcohol Use With Maternal and Prenatal Factors in American Indian Women. Social Biology, 45(3-4), 214-222.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Demographic factors and patterns of substance use among women who did not consume alcohol during pregnancy were compared to women who did consume alcohol during pregnancy. One-hundred seventy-seven Northern Plains Indian women who received prenatal care at an urban clinic in a rural state were screened for substance use as part of the validation study with a self-administered questionnaire. Women who drank during pregnancy were more likely to be single and have less education than women who did not drink. While most of the women in the study had available transportation resources, the women who drank during pregnancy were less likely to have transportation than the women who did not drink. Women who drank during pregnancy consumed more alcohol more frequently before pregnancy than did women who drank before but not during pregnancy. Compared to women who did not drink during pregnancy, women who drank during pregnancy were more likely to smoke cigarettes and use illicit drugs, to have parents who drank, to feel they drank the same or more than other pregnant women, or to have experienced more relationship breakups and physical and emotional abuse. Prenatal patients who drink alcohol during pregnancy need more intensive counseling regarding their multiple risk behaviors.  (Abstract by: Author)

1809.   La Barre, W. (1972). The ghost dance: origins of religion. London: Allen and Unwin.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1810.   Lacourte, J. A. (1998). Strengthening traditional American Indian education: an oral history curriculum approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Wisconsin--Madison.
Abstract: This dissertation examines the use of an oral history curriculum intervention project with American Indian youth in sixth grade. Beginning by examining common characteristics of traditional forms of American Indian Education and continuing with a retelling of formal Indian Education in this country, it becomes evident that traditional ways of learning, specifically oral traditions, have been severely damaged. Many American Indian tribes throughout the country are actively seeking ways to revitalize traditional practices. Using oral history in the classroom is one practice that schools can use in their efforts to help tribal communities. An oral history curriculum was created for use with American Indian students attending both public and tribal schools located on two reservations in northern Wisconsin. A review of the curriculum and the phases of the intervention design are discussed in detail. The evaluation of the curriculum intervention contains three major components: preliminary analyses, formative evaluation and short-term outcome evaluation. Preliminary analyses were calculated to help identify characteristics of those students most interested in tribal history and culture. Formative evaluation explores ways in which to improve the curriculum by examining critical, primary questions. Short-term outcome evaluation focuses on students' knowledge and skill levels and the extent to which the intervention has had an impact on their understanding of oral history. The intervention attempts to strengthen a traditional approach to learning indigenous to two American Indian communities. Oral ways of learning are acknowledged as legitimate and valid ways of gathering information. Family, relatives and community elders become actively involved in the education their youth receive and the school becomes a site for supporting and encouraging that participation. This intervention represents research that is conducted in collaboration with American Indian communities. School administration, school boards, teachers, students and community members were all involved in the process and design of the intervention. The author describes some of the difficulties and challenges of researching within her home community while also adhering to academic standards of research.

1811.   . (1979). N. W. LaDue, & C. KelseyReminiscences of Naomi Warren LaDue, White Earth band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23017537

1812.   Ladue, R. A. (1982). Standardization of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for the Colville Indian Reservation (Washington). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Washington State University.

1813.   LaDuke, V. (1983). Sun Bear, the path of power: as told to Wabun and to Barry Weinstock. Spokane, WA: Bear Tribe Publ.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXIX (1986:263)

1814.   LaDuke, W. (1995). Once and Future Harvests. Sojourners, 24(4), 24.
Notes: Source: UnCover
Abstract: Challenging absentee landholders and environmental damage, the Anishinabeg of Minnesota rebuild their land-based community. 

1815.   LaDuke, W., & Heyworth, E. (1990). Third World housing development and indigenous people in North America. Canadian Woman Studies/Les Cahiers De La Femme, 11, 12-14.
Notes: Source: Women's Resources International, Women Studies Abstracts [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 1999 search
In whole issue: Women and Housing/Les femmes et le logement dedicated to Katherine Lundy and Elspeth Heyworth; Editorial by Judith Kjellberg Bell and Pamela Sayne, p. 5, and The right to housing: housing language, housing reality? by Pamela Sayne, p. 6, with excerpts from the United Nations 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights.
Abstract: This article is about the experience of North American indigenous peoples in providing themselves with secure community-based housing. It illustrates that cultural differences require different responses and that the underlying problems of systematic discrimination within colonial and paternalistic socio-economic structures impoverish and oppress women and children. This article is part of a larger study commissioned by the Seventh Generation Fund, a non-profit Native foundation in Hoopa, California that supports Native grassroots advocacy and economic development. Housing initiatives undertaken by federal agencies in Canada and the USA are essentially "top-down" programs and in many cases have been mismatched with local values, land use patterns and needs. They thus reinforce dependency and feelings of powerlessness. An example is the relocation of, and a housing program for, the Ojibway of Ontario. JOURNAL INTRODUCTION/SW.

1816.   LaFarge, O. (1960). The American Indians. New York: Golden Press.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "A complete and valuable history for children of the Indians in North America.  Excellent resource book."

1817.   Lahache, M. (1939). Kanawake teieriwakwata = the Caughnawaga hymnal .
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

1818.   Laidlaw, G. E. (1915). Ojibwa myths and tales. in Ontario Provincial MuseumTwenty-seventh annual archaeological report 1915 being part of Appendix to the report of the Minister of Education, Ontario  (pp. 71-90). Toronto: A. T. Wilgress.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59), "for further examles of myths and legends published in this serial, see also: 1914:pp. 77-79; 1916, pp. 84-92; 1918, pp. 74-110; 1920, pp. 66-85; 1921, pp. 84-99, and 1924, pp. 34-80."

1819.   . (1960). E. J. Lajeunesse (editor),  The Windsor border region, Canada's southernmost frontier; a collection of documents . Toronto: The Champliain Society.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59), "texts in English and French"

1820.   Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian. (1998). Report of the Lake Mohonk Conference 1st-[35th]; 1883-[1929]. Philadelphia, PA : Executive Committee of the Indian Rights Association.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Title varies. No conference held 1917-1928 inclusive. Issued under earlier names of the conference as follows: 1883- 1884, Lake Mohonk Conference in Behalf of the Civilization and Legal Protection of the  Indians of the United States; 1885-1903, Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian; 1904-1913, Lake Mohonk Conference of the Indian and other Dependent Peoples; 1914-1916, Lake Mohonk Conference on the Indian and Other Dependent Peoples. Microfilm. Washington, D.C. : Brookhaven Press, [1998]. 2 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

1821.   Lake States Interpretive Association. (1980). What does the earth say? : a collection of papers presented by Voyageur National Park in cooperation with the Lake States Interpretive Association, the Minnesota Humanities Commission, and the National Endowment for the Humanities at Rainy River Community College, International Falls, Minnesota. International Falls, MN : Lake States Interpretive Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18927020. Other: Voyageurs National Park (Minn.) Minnesota Humanities Commission. National Endowment for the Humanities.
Abstract: Historic preservation in the national park system / F.A. Ketterson, Jr. -- The Value of the outdoor experience / George Stoiber -- Attitudes and traditions in the use of natural resources / Dr. Fred Witzig -- Wealth in the waters: a local history of commercial fishing / Dr. Larry Van Horn -- Fire, logging and the face of the forest / Dr. Lawrence Rakestraw. Oral histories - outside the classroom / Barb Sommer -- Archeology in the Voyageurs National Park area / Dr. Mark Lynott -- Underwater archeology and the fur trade / Robert C. Wheeler -- Indian traditions with a message for today/ Paul Schultz -- Some thoughts on the stewardship of land and of time / Robert Treuer -- Traditional basketry in the Voyageurs National Park region / Richard Weis.

1822.   Landes, R. (Anthropologist).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995), worked for the B.I.A. at Red Lake

1823.   Landes, R. (1937). The Ojibwa of Canada. in M. Mead (editor), Cooperation and competition among primitive peoples  (pp. 87-126). New York and London: McGraw Hill.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 1, item 7
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:59-60)

1824.   Landes, R. Ojibwa Sociology.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1825.   Landes, R. (1937). Ojibwa Sociology. New York: Columbia Universitiy Press.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 1, item 2
Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:60)

1826.   Landes, R. (1938). Ojibwa sociology. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University.

1827.   Landes, R. Ojibwa Woman.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1828.   Landes, R. (1938). The Ojibwa woman. New York: Columbia Universitiy Press.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 1, item 8
Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:60)
Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database:  New Books on Women & Feminism Database, Women, Race & Ethnicity Database], August 29, 1999 search
Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVII (1973:122)
Abstract: Originally published in 1938, this ethnographic study of women in the Ojibwa culture of Western Ontario was one of the first book-length examinations of the lives of native women. Landes devotes the bulk of her text to the life cycle of Ojibwa women (youth, marriage, occupations, "abnormalities"). A final chapter presents three brief life histories.

1829.   Landes, R. (1971). The Ojibwa woman. New York: Norton.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVII (1973:122)

1830.   Landes, R. (1968). Ojibway religion and the Midéwiwin. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIV (1970:121)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:60)

1831.   Landes, R. (1970). Ojibway religion and the Midéwiwin. Wisconsin: Wisconsin University Press.
Notes: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVI (1972:121)

1832.   Landin, G. (1972). A Study of Three Chippewa Families at Warroad, Minnesota and Their Historical and Cultural Contributions. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Moorhead State College.
Notes: ERIC NO: ED092304
Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: The study presents some aspects of American Indian history and culture of the Warroad, Minnesota region, examining three well- known Chippewa families--Ka-Kay-Geesick, Lightning, and Thunder. These families were selected because of their significance in the area--Ka-Kay-Geesick was a well-known medicine man//the Lightning name is associated with craftwork//the Thunder family has had a succession of five chiefs, including the present chief. The material was gathered over a 2-year period, principally by personal interviews with family members. The study includes a literature review, the stories of these three families, including the Warroad Indian today, family photographs, and economic trends. A discussion of the arts, crafts, and industry of the Chippewas includes picture stories, folklore, and a Wendigo folktale. The appendixes give Treaty No. 3, a historical review of the Red Lake Indians, the Indian census role, Margaret Lightning's personal story, excerpts of 1904 promotional materials, and a discussion of the Buffalo Point Project and the Council for Quality Education. (KM)

1833.   Lane, R. B. The Treaties of Puget Sound, 1854-1855.  Institute for the Development of Indian Law.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1834.   Lang, A. (1885). The comparative study of ghost stories. Nineteenth Century, 17, 623-632. 4 refs.
Notes: Source: Parapsychology Abstracts International, Dec 1985:30-31
Abstract: A standard explanation for the widespread belief in ghosts found among primitive peoples is that such beliefs derive from dreams of the dead.  But this theory does not take into consideration the more-or-less well-authenticated cases in which primitive people have seen ghosts of the sort reported in modern society.  This is the type of apparation studied by the Society for Psychical Research.  Anthropologists have established their own theories about belief in ghosts without considering whether the appearances of genuine apparations may have actually helped form and confirm these beliefs.  Psychic researchers, on the other hand, have not considered the rich parallels between anthropological reports of psychic happenings and more modern accounts.  Although the traditional "ghost stories" of these people have little bearing on the study of apparitions, the parallels between mediiumistic performances and primitive shamanism call for an explanation.  Several cases of apparitions and hauntings drawn from folklore and anthropological literature are cited and compared with contemporary accounts. --D.S.R.

1835.   Lang, G. C. (1979). Survival strategies of Chippewa Indian drinkers in Minneapolis. Central Issues in Anthropology, 1(2), 19-40, tabl., bibliogr.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXV (1982:143)

1836.   Lange B. K. (1988). Ethnographic Interview: an Occupational Therapy Needs Assessment Tool for American Indian and Alaska Native Alcoholics. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, 8(2), 61-80.
Notes: Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search. (34 Ref)

1837.   Langevin, H., Sir, 1826-1906. (1869). Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 23d April, 1869; for a Return shewing what progress has been made in opening up communication between Fort William and the Red River settlement; also what amount has been expended upon said work, together with names of parties to whom amounts have been paid in connection with such work, and for what service. Ottawa.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21955381.  Caption title. At head of title: 32 Victoria. Sessional papers (no. 42) A.1869.  Other: Dawson, S. J. (Simon James), 1820-1902. Snow, John A. The line of route between Lake Superior and the Red River settlement.

1838.   Lantz, R. C. (1993). Ottawa & Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1855-1868: Including Some Swan Creek & Black River of the Sac & Fox Agency for the Years 1857, 1858 & 1865.  Heritage Books, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1839.   Lantz, R. C. (1991). Ottawa & Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1870-1909.  Heritage Books, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1840.   Lantz, R. C. (1992). Potawatomi: Indians of Michigan, 1843-1904.  Heritage Books, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1841.   Lanzi, R. G., Pascoe, J. M., Keltner, B., & Ramey, S. L. (1999). Correlates of Maternal Depressive Symptoms in a National Head Start Program Sample. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 153(8), 801-807.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Objective: To examine correlates of maternal depressive symptoms in a diverse, national sample of mothers whose kindergarten-aged children attended a Head Start program.

1842.   LaPierre, M. (1992). Le reve d'une litterature sauvage d'Alfred Desrochers a Jacques Ferron. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universite de Montreal, Canada.
Abstract:  L'auteur de cette these tente de montrer la continuite historique entre les idees d'Alfred Desrochers (1901-1978) et celles de Jacques Ferron (1921-1985) sur la creation, au Quebec, d'une litterature autochtone, c'est-a-dire affranchie de la domination culturelle etrangere, francaise en particulier. En plus d'aborder dans les oeuvres de ces deux ecrivains l'aspect theorique de la question, il analyse dans leur ecriture la mise en pratique de leur vision identitaire autour de themes communs tels que l'obsession de la geographie, la hantise d'une identite nord-americaine, la fascination du paradis perdu, la conscience de la misere tribale et la croyance en la primaute de l'oral sur l'ecrit. Pour atteindre ce but, l'auteur tire profit des methodes eprouvees de l'histoire litteraire et de la critique thematique. Il souligne avant tout que les deux ecrivains annexent le patrimoine amerindien a l'heritage culturel du Quebec. Ce qui constitue, explique-t-il, le fondement meme de leur conception de la litterature sauvage. Si l'on poursuit sur les grandes lignes de la these, on constate que, dans cette optique sauvagiste, Ferron et Desrochers font un rapprochement entre la litterature americaine et  la litterature canadienne-francaise, accordent beaucoup d'importance a l'enfance, au folklore et a la religion, s'inscrivent dans la tradition liberale, gardent leur distance par rapport au nationalisme qu'ils voient comme une doctrine europeenne de droite inadaptee a notre condition. Malgre une parente indeniable entre les deux oeuvres, il ne faut pas confondre les personnalites bien marquees des deux ecrivains. Desrochers recuse avec force l'etiquette de terroiriste dont on l'affuble, se veut formaliste, elabore une theorie du canadianisme integral en s'appuyant sur la primaute de la 'forme' par rapport au 'fond', a de l'amour une conception qui tranche sur le puritanisme de l'epoque et sombre souvent dans un miserabilisme auquel l'abus de l'alcool et les difficultes financieres ne sont pas etrangers. Quant a Ferron, il enrichit les idees de Desrochers sur le caractere amerindien de l'identite canadienne-francaise au point d'assimiler son peuple au tiers monde, de se defier aussi bien de l'Anglais que du Francais, de voir dans notre catholicisme une religion nationale plus nord-americaine qu'europeenne, d'adopter (par opposition a ce qu'il entend par nationalisme) une attitude anticolonialiste, resolument de gauche. De plus, sa 'folie' suicidaire influence grandement ses ecrits. Ce qui explique en partie son  etrange protestation contre un pretendu complot mediatique, etats-unien et d'extreme droite visant a precipiter l'extinction des primitifs et meme des petits peuples. Il voit dans ces victimes de la 'civilisation petroliere' le Sauvage Redempteur du monde, figure deja esquissee dans la poesie de Desrochers. Ferron souhaite que la litterature du Quebec, en tentant de transcrire l'univers oral, devienne le temoignage d'une reconciliation entre l'Occident et le tiers monde. Finalement, on decouvre que l'idee de litterature autochtone forme chez Desrochers et chez Ferron un reve philosophique plutot qu'une notion litteraire precise. Ce qui nous permet de voir dans leurs oeuvres une coherence profonde et de mieux saisir la continuite historique qui les unit. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

1843.   LaPointe, J. J. (1993). Analyse des besoins de perfectionnement des maitres oeuvrant en milieu Amerindien au Quebec en applications pedagogiques de l'ordinateur. Canada.
Abstract: Nous avons voulu, par cette etude, faire l'analyse des besoins de pertectionnement en applications pedagogiques de l'ordinateur, aupres des mai tres tant allochtones qu'autochtones oeuvrant en milieu amerindien du Quebec. Pour ce faire, une banque de quarante-sept (47) competences a ete constituee par le biais de la litterature et de la consultation de quelques personnes ressources. Cette banque fut ensuite soumise au jugement de cent quatre-vingt deux (182) repondants, enseignants, directeurs d'ecole et quelques autres intervenants en education travaillant en milieux algonquin, attikamekw, huron-wendat, mic-mac, mohawk et montagnais. Ces repondants oeuvraient au prescolaire, primaire et secondaire. L'analyse des besoins fut faite a partir de la mesure de l'ecart entre la situation desiree par les repondants, soit l'importance qu'ils attachaient au fait de posseder des competences en micro-informatique et la situation actuelle, soit le degre de mai trise de ces memes competences, detenu au moment de l'enquete. Nous avons utilise quatre approches de mise en priorite des besoins pour en venir a une mise en rang finale des competences contenues dans la banque. L'etude demontre qu'il existe un besoin important de perfectionnement des mai tres en applications pedagogiques de  l'ordinateur et cela peu importe le milieu de travail. On constate egalement que les allochtones accordent une moins grande importance que les autochtones au fait de mai triser l'ensemble des competences questionnees en micro-informatique. De plus, il existe un plus grand besoin de perfectionnement en ce qui a trait a la micro-informatique utilisee comme outil de gestion et de preparation de classe que comme outil/objet d'enseignement.

1844.   Lappegaard, R. (1958). The Indian welfare situation . Minnesota Welfare, 10(12), p. 1-18 : ill. ; 19 cm.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24120356. Caption title. Detached from: Minnesota welfare, v. 10, no. 12 (summer 1958).

1845.   Laprise, H. (1994). Decrochage scolaire ches les Amerindiens. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universite Laval, Canada.
Abstract: Au Quebec, les Amerindiens sont fortement touches par l e phenomene du decrochage scolaire. Les difficultes a s'integrer a une autre culture y sont pour beaucoup. Pourtant, l'ecole est l'objet d'un enjeu important pour les Amerindiens carelle leur permet de reproduire les tradions ancestrales et aussi de former les jeunes Amerindiens pour le marche du travail. Mais pour accomplir cette double mission, on ne sait pas jusqu'a quel point l'integration a la culture allochotone est necessaire et quelles valeurs proposer aux etudiants et etudiantes. Ce memoire questionne ce role de l'ecole et fait etat de ce dilemme. Il pose le probleme du choc culturel. Il demontre que l'integration harmonieuse des deux cultures et la reciprocite sont les options du developpement et de la reussite scolaire.

1846.   Laroche, F. A. (1999). Selected screening instruments implemented in the study of alcoholism in the American Indian population (Native Americans). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, United States International University.
Abstract: The problem. Instruments implemented as screening devices for detection of alcohol use and abuse may not be a valid or reliable measure for use with American Indians as many of the sample norms were developed for use with the dominant society (Dana,  1993). The reliability is partly dependent on the population on which the instrument is normed and whether the instrument performs the same in both cultures (Dana, 1993). The validity of the items may not be culturally relevant to American Indians because many of the                              items were developed with the Caucasian population in mind (Dana,  1993). Therefore, many instruments used with Indians would not adequately measure Indian alcohol use (Trimble, 1990). Method.  This is a critical review of the literature on selected self-report alcohol screening instruments used with American Indians. The review includes the available literature on alcohol screening instruments including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), MacAndrews Alcoholism scale (MAC), Michigan Alcoholism Screening Inventory (MAST), Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI), CAGE screening instrument, Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-L),  and ethnographic interviews used in screening for alcohol use or abuse. Results. Research was reviewed regarding the difference in performance on instruments utilized for American Indians. These research findings provide evidence of instruments that may be utilized with certain tribes of Indians such as the Southern Cheyenne.  Some instruments were modified for use with American Indians  Also, the research indicates a difference in scoring on some instruments primarily due to ethnic and cultural differences. Data on the reliability and validity of most of the instruments found did not indicate whether the use of the instrument was reliable or valid for the American Indian. The American Indian was not usually included in the norming samples used to validate the use of the instrument.  Most of the research done is sparse and does not include data significant in determining whether the screening instrument for determining alcohol use and abuse in the American Indian is reliable or valid for that population.

1847.   Larocque, R. (1991). Une etude ethnohistorique et paleoanthropologique des epidimies en Huronie. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universite de Montreal, Ontario, Canada.
Notes: 
Abstract: Cette these traite des epidemies qui ont largement contribue a decimer les populations amerindiennes du sud-est de l'Ontario l'arrivee des Europeens dans le Nord-Est americain a la fin du XVIe et au debut du XVIIe siecles. De quelque 30 000 qu'ils etaient au moment des premiers contacts directs avec les Francais en 1609, les Hurons ne se comptaient plus que par centaines en 1650. Bien connues des chercheurs, ces epidemies, d'origine europeenne, n'ont jamais ete analysees de facon approfondie et plusieurs questions demeuraient non resolues. Notre recherche comporte deux volets complementaires, car les epidemies pouvaient etre documentees a la fois par des documents ethnohistoriques et par des collections de squelettes humains. Nous avons exploite cette double approche pour mieux comprendre comment les facteurs biologiques, culturels et environnementaux ont interagi lors du genocide. De nombreux chercheurs ont voulu identifier les maladies qui ont balaye la Huronie entre 1634 et 1650, mais aucun n'a traite la question en profondeur sur le plan medical. Nous sommes donc repartis a zero. Tous les documents historiques relatifs aux Hurons ont ete analyses et reinterpretes a la lumiere des caracteristiques epidemiologiques des maladies qui pouvaient etre en cause. Nous en concluons que l'epidemie de 1634, le plus souvent imputee a la rougeole, aurait plutot ete causee par la variole, et qu'en 1636 et 1637, il n'y eut pas deux mais une seule epidemie d'influenza. La variole a certainement participe a celle de 1639-1640, mais elle aurait eu des complices: la rougeole, l'influenza, la varicelle, la coqueluche et la scarlatine ont aussi ete evoquees. Nous voulions aussi voir si les epidemies pouvaient etre detectees a l'analyse de restes humains. Nous avons donc compare les squelettes de trois ossuaires: ceux de Fairty (ca1400 A.D.), de Kleinburg (ca 1600 A.D.) et d'Ossossane (1636A.D.). Il en ressort que la composition demographique et la frequence de certaines lesions osseuses de la collection prehistorique s'ecartent nettement de celles des deux autres collections, respectivement protohistorique et posterieure a la premiere epidemie connue. Les attributs des deux collections recentes sont compatibles avec l'existence d'epidemies et attestent que des epidemies ont sevi en Huronie avant la premiere rencontre connue entre les Hurons et les Francais. Nous avons demontre par cette recherche comment les documents anciens et les restes humains permettent de documenter les epidemies du passe et combien il peut etre profitable d'utiliser conjointement ces deux sources de donnees.

1848.   Larom, H. (1962). Ride like an Indian. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "A boy spends a summer on a dude ranch and learns from an Indian boy how to train his pony to run with the swiftest horses."

1849.   Larson, S. (1993). Fragmentation of a tribal people in Louise Erdrich's Tracks. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 17(2), 1-13.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1850.   Lass, W. E. (1965). The "Moscow Expedition.". Minnesota History, 39, 337-240, illus., map., port., bibliographical footnotes.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19341718

1851.   . (1905). S. E. LathropA historical sketch of the "Old Mission" and its missionaries to the Ojibway Indians, on Madeline Island, Lake Superior; Wisconsin ...  Ashland, WI: The Author.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:60)

1852.   . (1946). W. Lathrop, 1892- Black river captive . New York: Random House.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: While searching for his missing relatives during the French and Indian War, a young boy is captured by the Indians, but plans an escape which leads him to his father.

1853.   LaVigne, L.-A. (1992). Portrayals of oppression in Canadian literature (Native Tribes). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada).
Abstract: In Canadian literature, the consequences of oppression are often portrayed in the experiences of characters who belong to marginalized groups. Included in this study are accounts of people from various Native tribes and the Metis. Peter Such's Riverrun and Rudy Wiebe's The Temptations of Big Bear depict historical events where the Indigenes suffered social injustices. An Antane Kapesh retells the gradual loss of language, culture, spiritual beliefs and land in Qu'as-tu fait de mon pays? And in Tchipayuk ou le chemin du loup and in The Diviners, Ronald Lavallee and Margaret Laurence recount ordeals of Metis life in Canada. The state of oppression is further illustrated in Timothy Findley's novel, Not Wanted on the Voyage, where a hateful patriarch seeks vengeance by destroying the world. The relationship between man and nature forms the basis of the conflicting ideologies. The Europeans believe that man is a superior being who should subjugate and control his physical environment while the aboriginal people see themselves as belonging to an organic environment which they respect and revere since they depend on the earth for their survival. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

1854.   . (1935). I. Lavine, & W. J. LaMarreSummary report of Lake Traverse - Bois de Sioux Project and Red River Project  . [Bismarck, N.D.] : North Dakota State Planning Board, University of North Dakota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 11047368.  Cover title. May 25, 1935. Mimeographed.  Other: LaMarre, W. J. North Dakota. State Planning Board. United States. National Resources Board. University of North Dakota

1855.   Lawrence, W. J. (1970). The Legal system of the Red Lake Reservation . Grand Forks, N.D.  University of North Dakota, School of Law.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 11864442.  "To fulfill requirements of law 493, advanced legal research." Bibliography: p. 27-32.  ... accession: 20514627.

1856.   Lawson, P. B. (1920). The Potawatomi. Wisconsin Archaeologist, 19, 41-116.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1857.   . (1925). V. E. Lawson (Victor Emanuel), 1871-1960The first settlements in the Kandiyohi region and their fate in the Indian outbreak  .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4121244

1858.   Le Roy de la Potherie, C.-C., & Le Roy, C. C., Bacqueville de la Potherie (published as). (1911-1912). History of the savage peoples who are allies of New France. in The Indian tribes of the upper Mississippi valley and region of the Great lakes as described by Nicolas Perrot, French Commandant in the Northwest; Bacqueville de la Potherie, French royal Commissioner to Canada; Morrell Marston, American Army officer, and Thomas Forsyth, United States agent at Fort Armstrong ... Vol. vol. 1//vol. 2 (pp. 273-372//12-136). Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Co.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:60-1)

1859.   Lea-McKeown, M. Y. (1988). The importance of native music culture in education at a Manitoba Ojibwa reserve from an ethnological perspective. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada).
Abstract: The purpose of the study was to investigate the importance of current musical practice on an Ojibwa Indian Reserve, relating this to the provision of music education. Ethnological research methods were used among the research population with the researcher becoming a participant observer in the community and at the school. Additional information was obtained through interview questionnaires concerning musical practice and the people's perceptions of native music and music education. The findings of the study indicate that fiddling and jigging are the current musical practices on the reserve, these being considered native music by the majority. The adults desired these cultural items to be reinforced and continued in music instruction programmes developed for children. The children exhibited a partial disengagement from the musical culture of their environment. None actually played the fiddle although they actively participated in jigging. The majority of children expressed a desire for guitar instruction in school. The school has recently implemented music classes for elementary grades, the content presently consisting of singing with musical concepts introduced through that medium. The music curriculum does not follow the Manitoba music curriculum guide and the teachers are not music specialists, being assigned to their positions rather than being musically qualified. The music curriculum, oral in the community and formal in the school, is not fulfilling the expressed mandate of the people 'to continue Indian culture' and 'to give the children an interest in music.' The community curriculum, although largely native in content, is not motivating the younger generation to seriously embark into fiddling. The school programme has no observable native content and contributes little to the child's understanding of his heritage in music. The fiddling traditions of Ebb and Flow are becoming defunct. A carefully implemented music curriculum with trained personnel acting in concert with skilled community musicians is suggested as a solution to the problems of poorly motivated children and the loss of valued cultural items. Such a curriculum could stimulate the child's pride in his heritage, forming a familiar foundation from which to explore other musics.

1860.   Lea-McKeown, M. Y. (1985). The role of music in a Saulteaux community. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Manitoba, Ottawa. National Library of Canada. National Library of Canada, Canadian theses on microfiche = Theses canadiennes sur microfiche, 57488 0227-3845.  ISBN: 0315095709.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search)

1861.   Leacock, E. The Montagnais `Hunting Territory' and the Fur Trade. American Anthropologist , 56 [Part 2, Memoir No. 78](5), 1-2.
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

1862.   League of Women Voters of Minneapolis. (1964). League of Women Voters tour of Indian reservations . Minneapolis, [Minn.] : League of Women Voters of Minneapolis.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6106025. Caption title.

1863.   League of Women Voters of Minnesota. (1963). Capitol letter on Indian affairs : a report on the 1963 Minnesota Legislature . Minneapolis, Minn.  League of Women Voters of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6108727. Cover title.

1864.   League of Women Voters of Minnesota. (1962). Indians of Minnesota. Minneapolis.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"

1865.   League of Women Voters of Minnesota. (1968). Pre-legislative conference on Indian affairs : December 10, 1968, Christ Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill. [St. Paul?, Minn.] : League of Women Voters of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 5882300. Caption title.

1866.   League of Women Voters of St. Paul. Indian Housing Study Committee. (1973). Indian Housing Study Committee working papers. St. Paul : League of Women Voters of St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4693003. Caption title. Bibliography: p.[12].

1867.   League of Women Voters of St. Paul. Indian Study Committee. (1974). Indian Study Committee working papers. St. Paul : League of Women Voters of St. Paul. Indian Study Committee.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4075650. Caption title. "Second of a two-part study." Needs of the American Indian in St. Paul in education, employment, chemical dependency and human rights.

1868.   Leary, J. R. (1960). Cultural variation, personality and values among the Chippewa. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.

1869.   Leavitt, J. (1962). America and Its Indians. New York: Grosset and Dunlap, Incorporated.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Coast to coast review of the distinctive features of American Indian culture.  Food, clothing, crafts, customs, forms of government, social slive, and religion from the prehistoric times to the present.  Grades 3-6."

1870.   Leckie, R. (1959). Fire at Red Lake . New York : Simon and Schuster.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ...
Abstract: While on a camping trip in the northern Minnesota woods three boys get caught in a forest fire and help the Air Force locate a missing A-bomb. ... accession: 31931638.

1871.   Lee, A. R. (1995-1996). 'Ojibway Tales' - Johnston,B. American Book Review, 16(5), 19.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1872.   Lee, D. H., Clites, A. H., & Quinn, F. H. (1997). Impact of the Niagara River Chippawa Grass Island Pool on Lakes Erie and Michigan-Huron. 40th Conference of the International Association for Great Lakes Research, Buffalo, New York, USA Buffalo, NY.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1873.   Lee, E. T., Cowan, L. D., Welty, T. K., Sievers, M., Howard, W. J., Oopik, A., Wang, W., Yeh, J., Devereux, R. B., Rhoades, E. R., Fabsitz, R. R., Go, O., & Howard, B. V. (1998). All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Three American Indian Populations, Aged 45-74 Years, 1984-1988. The Strong Heart Study [See Comments]. American Journal of Epidemiology, 147(11), 995-1108.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Community mortality surveillance for 1984-1988 was conducted by researchers of the Strong Heart Study, which examined the incidence, prevalence, and risk factors of cardiovascular disease in three American Indian populations, aged 45-74 years, in Arizona, Oklahoma, and South/North Dakota. All-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality rates were determined through the use of death certificate data. Cardiovascular disease deaths were confirmed by independent systematic review of medical records. In all three populations, men had higher all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality rates than did women. Oklahoma exhibited slightly lower 5-year, age-adjusted, all-cause mortality (96/1,000) than did Arizona (107/1,000) and South/North Dakota (114/1,000). The leading cause of death among both sexes in Oklahoma and in South/North Dakota was cardiovascular disease. Diabetes mellitus led among Arizona women. The other major causes of death were cancer, liver disease including cirrhosis, and injury. When compared with the rates in each state, average annual all-cause mortality rates were higher for the American Indian populations in almost every age group. The all-cause annual mortality rates in the three Indian populations were close to rates in the US black population and higher than the rates of the entire US population and of US whites. This trend was amplified in the 45- to 64-year age group. Only in the 65- to 74-year age group did mortality rates in the Indian population approach those of the US population. Cardiovascular disease mortality rates were close to the US averages in Arizona and Oklahoma, but they were more than two times higher in South/North Dakota among those between 45 and 64 years of age. Thus, American Indians in Arizona, Oklahoma, and South/North Dakota exhibit high all-cause mortality rates. In particular, the South/North Dakota population cardiovascular disease death rate appears to present a potential target for community-based programs to intervene on known risk factors to promote healthy lifestyles.  (Abstract by: Author)

1874.   Lee, T. D., Zhao, T. M., Chow, M. P., & Lee, G. (1990). Hla, Gm, Km, and Diego Blood Group Typing of Chippewa Indians. Transfusion, 30(8), 728-732.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: This is the first report characterizing HLA antigen distribution in North American Indians of the Chippewa tribe. One hundred seventy-four Chippewa from Minnesota underwent HLA-A,B,C,DR, and DQ typing in a search for a single unrelated bone marrow donor. The high matching rate of this successful search is attributed to homozygosity and the extreme frequency of certain antigens in this small ethnic community. It is emphasized that smaller donor pools are required in searches within a minority population. GM and KM allotype typing as well as blood group Diego typing show patterns similar to those reported in other North American Indian groups.  (Abstract by: Author)

1875.   Leekley, T. B. (1965). The world of Manabozho: tales of the Chippewa Indians. New York: Vanguard Press.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XI (1967:152)

1876.   LeGare, E. I. (1997). 'Nobody speaks for the nation anymore': Canda's problems with itself (Metis, cultural identity, aboriginal). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Duke University.
Abstract: This dissertation analyzes the reformation of Metis identity produced by the politics of cultural identity in Canada. My purpose is to understand how the meanings underlying the discursive practices of Canadian, Aboriginal, and Metis nationalists establish and organize the collectivities called forth by the identity categories, 'Canadian,' 'Aboriginal,' and 'Metis.' This dissertation questions the naturalistic and objectifying presuppositions that sustain and organize these collectivities as they are envisioned and fought out within the framework of a multiculturally diverse nation that accords political significance to cultural identities. Equally, I seek to uncover how relations of power are embedded within, organized through, and in turn, help structure the meanings that underpin these competing nationalisms and their versions of the Canadian nation. I argue Metis identity formation cannot be adequately analyzed using a state-centered approach. Equally, it cannot be understood if the framework of analysis is limited to the Metis or even a pan-Aboriginal community. I analyze Metis identity formation as a dialogic process, using data obtained from interviews, conversations, and observations of representations of Canadian, Aboriginal, and Metis identities. I am particularly interested in the public sphere of Canadian society. I argue Canadian nationalism represents the real Canadian as a culturally unmarked citizen. As a culturally identified category, Aboriginal People are positioned apart from the national community. Similarly, Aboriginal nationalism represents the Aboriginal and White/Euro-Canadian as mutually exclusive categories. I argue Metis nationalism seeks to reinsert the Metis between the poles of identity Aboriginal and Canadian. I conclude that, within the space of signification produced by these competing nationalisms, Metis are identified as Aboriginal. The real Canadian is the culturally unmarked Canadian and Aboriginal Canadians are encapsulated and subordinated within Canadian society. I conclude Aboriginal People are permitted a voice but it is carefully circumscribed; Aboriginal People are within but not members of the Canadian nation. They are not real Canadians. Thus, I conclude the understandings that sustain the Canadian community and the culturalization of difference within Canada curtails, even undermines Aboriginal participation in Canadian society.

1877.   Leinbach, R. B. (1979). Crafts and culture contacts: the effects of donor cultures on the crafts production of the Chippewa Indians of Michigan. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University.

1878.   Leitch, A. (1955). Porcupine Crafts.  Canadian Geographical Journal, 51(3), 128-129.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology (1955:I-914)
Abstract: Luxury handicrafts of Ojibways [sic] Indians in Pony Island

1879.   . (1889). R. LennoxLittle Crow, or, The tomahawk and scalping- knife in Minnesota : a thrilling story of the Indian massacre and war of 1862 . New York : F. Tousey.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13229848. Caption title. Little Crow / by Robert Lennox -- A blue enameled ring / by an English detective

1880.   Lensen, S. L. (1996). Protohistoric butchering at four Oldman River Dam Reservoir sites (Bison, Metis, Alberta). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Calgary (Canada).
Abstract: The bison remains of the Protohistoric components of four sites in the Oldman River Dam Reservoir area are examined. These sites include two kill sites (DjPm-80 and DjPm-126) and two campsites (DjPm-100 and DjPm-115). Intra- and inter-site variation in the portioning and marking of the bones during butchering is discussed. Although there are some differences in the manner of butchering at these sites, the overall similarities suggest that there was a consistent butchering pattern in this area in the Protohistoric. Comparisons to evidence from Metis sites indicates that the Metis butchering pattern contrasts with several aspects of butchering at these sites, thus supporting the existence of a distinctive Native butchering pattern.

1881.   Lepper, B. T. (1987). Early Paleo-Indian land-use patterns in the central Muskingum River basin, Coshocton County, Ohio. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University.
Abstract: The archaeological record of the late Pleistocene human occupation of eastern North America appears to consist of a diffuse scatter of diagnostic projectile points across the landscape with a few documented concentrations of material associated with prominant chert outcrops. Coshocton County, Ohio has been identified as one major center of Paleo-Indian activity in this region. The outcrops of Upper Mercer chert here have been claimed to be the source of raw material for Paleo-Indian artifacts strewn across the entire northeast. From 1983 to 1985 a survey of private and public collections recorded 410 fluted points and 67 fluted point yielding localities within Coshocton County. In order to interpret these data in terms of late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer land use, they were incorporated into a 'siteless survey.' This approach recognizes the importance of isolated artifacts for contributing to a complete understanding of hunter-gatherer land use patterns. Four general types of 'settlement' were defined including large and small workshop/occupations, chert processing loci, and food procurement/processing loci. The distribution of these sites in relation to various features of the local environment suggests that Paleo-Indian bands aggregated during the spring and summer at base camps near quarries and dispersed for the autumn and winter into protected environmental situations. Food procurement activities seem to have focused primarily on dispersed, non-aggregated game species such as white-tailed deer. The concentration of Paleo-Indian artifacts in Coshocton County and similar regions may simply reflect the high redundancy in the Paleo-Indian land use system in areas with limited loci of availability for critical chert resources. The scattered finds of Upper Mercer chert artifacts in Paleo-Indian contexts from Wisconsin to New York may reflect the gradual northward dispersion of southeastern populations through Ohio into the upper Great Lakes region.

1882.   Lesser, A. (1961). Who speaks for the American Indian? Midway, 8, 1-17.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:56)

1883.   Lester, T. (1986). Daughters of the country - a profile of Gladys Taylor. Herizons, 4(2), 31.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women's Studies  Database], August 29, 1999 search

1884.   Levasseur, E. (1898). The question of the sources of the Mississippi River . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's ! northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

1885.   Levi, C. (1956). Chippewa Indians of yesterday and today. New York: Pageant Press.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. II (1956:2-3972)
Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"

1886.   Lewis, C. F. M., & Anderson, T. W. (1989). Oscillations of Levels and Cool Phases of the Laurentian Great Lakes Caused by Inflows From Glacial Lakes Agassiz and Barlow-Ojibway Canada. Journal of Paleolimnology, 2(2), 99-146.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Two distinct episodes of increased water flux imposed on the Great Lakes system by discharge from upstream proglacial lakes during the period from about 11.5 to 8 ka resulted in expanded outflows, raised lake levels and associated climate changes.  The interpretation of these major hydrological and climatic effects, previously unrecognized, is mainly based on the evidence of former shorelines, radiocarbon-dated shallow-water sediment sequences, paleohydraulic estimates of discharge, and pollen diagrams of vegetation change within the basins of the present Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Nipissing.  The concept of inflow from glacial Lake Agassiz adjacent to the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet about 11-10 and 9.5-8.5 ka is generally supported, with inflow possibly augmented during the second period by backflooding of discharge from glacial Lake Barlow-Ojibway.  Although greater dating control is needed, six distinct phases can be recognized which characterize the hydrological history of the Upper Great Lakes from about 12 to 5 ka; 1) an early ice-dammed Kirkfield phase until 11.0 ka which drained directly to Ontario basin; 2) an ice-dammed Main Algonquin phase (11.0-10.5 ka) of relatively colder surface temperature with an associated climate reversal caused by greater water flux from glacial Lake Agassiz; 3) a short Post Algonquin phase (about 10.5-10.1 ka) encompassing ice retreat and drawdown of Lake Algonquin; 4) an Ottawa-Marquette low phase (about 10.1-9.6 ka) characterized by drainage via the then isostatically depressed Mattawa-Ottawa Valley and by reduction in Agassiz inflow by the Marquette glacial advance in Superior basin; 5) a Mattawa phase of high and variable levels (about 9.6-8.3 ka) which induced a second climatic cooling in the Upper Great Lakes area.  Lakes of the Mattawa phase supported by large inflows from both Lakes Agassiz and Barlow-Ojibway and were controlled by hydraulic resistance at a common outlet - the Rankin Constriction in Ottawa Valley - with an estimated base-flow discharge in the order of 200 000 m3s-1.  6) Lakes of the Nipissing phase (about 8.3-4.7 ka) existed below the base elevation of the previous Lake Mattawa, were nourished by local precipitation and runoff only, and drained by the classic North Bay outlet to Ottawa Valley.

1887.   Lewis, D. R. (1996). The White Earth Tragedy: Ethnicity and Dispossession at a Minnesota Anishinaabe Reservation, 1889-1920 (book reviews). The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 26 (1), 159 (2).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: The general history of American Indian assimilation and dispossession is probably familiar to most readers, but its variants are numerous. So are theoretical explanations for the process of culture contact and change. Meyer examines White Earth Anishinaabe experiences with and responses to directed change, both internal and external. Although she focuses on a brief thirty-year period of Anishinaabe history, she extends her narrative from the point of culture contact to the present in order to explain the enormity of those changes, the "remarkable creativity of native adaptations" (xiv), and the marginalization of Anishinaabe people whose cultural values, subsistence strategies, political systems, and individual choices, in part, shaped their outcome.
Meyer begins by discussing the adaptive role of Anishinaabe migration, intermarriage with Euroamericans, and the ultimate ethnogenesis of a tribe out of scattered band societies. Of particular interest is her description of the emergence of two distinct Anishinaabe ethnic groups separated by settlement, subsistence, religion, education, and heredity.
Through the rest of her study, Meyer traces the growing factionalism between mixed blood mediators ("cultural brokers") and full blood conservatives, and how this internal debate played out against the backdrop of federal policy and corporate designs. As Meyer explains, it was not simply a matter of greedy outsiders taking Indian resources (which they did), but a more complex story of mixed-blood cultural brokers steering tribal members and the federal government with self-interested advice that contributed to the alienation of 80 percent of White Earth lands by 1909 and the corporate theft of White Earth timber in the following decade. As diversified subsistence strategies failed, their land base dwindled, and their populations increased, both conservative and mixed blood Anishinaabeg found themselves impoverished and abandoned on the periphery of the American market economy.
Meyer does an excellent job grappling with the difficult task of defining and untangling factional politics over time. She acknowledges the complexity and perversity of factional alignments beyond the diverging ethnic and economic identities of Anishinaabe individuals, groups, and regions that she identifies. She also points out the adaptive strengths and weaknesses of this factionalism, both intended and incidental.
The level of Meyer's ethnohistorical analysis and her command of primary documents and the secondary literature in several fields is impressive. Well written, although at times detail-dense, the book offers much to satisfy both the specialist and the interdisciplinary generalist looking for larger theoretical insights into the processes of adaptation, factionalism, cultural reproduction and transformation, and incorporation.
David Rich Lewis Utah State University
Full Text COPYRIGHT 1996 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

1888.   Lewis, I. M. (1986). Religion in context: cults and charisa. Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1889.   Lewis, J. O., 1799-1858. (1839). The North American aboriginal port-folio.  Title from cover: [No. 2] Mi-a-qua, Kitch-ee-i-aa-ba, Cut-taa-tas-tia, Mish-sha- quat, Me-no-quet, Nabu-naa-kee-shick. -- [No. 3] Abraham Quary, Waa-pa-laa, Brewett, Chippeway squaw and child, Waa-em- besh-ka, Chippewa squaws. New York : George Adlard.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
OTHER: Bufford, John H.

1890.   Lewis, T. E. (1992). Distant drums: old and new in the fiction of Louise Erdrich (Chippewa). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Tarleton State University.
Abstract: This thesis analyzes three novels by Louise Erdrich: Tracks, The Beet Queen, and Love Medicine. A brief biographical sketch is followed by a chapter tracing the Chippewa tribal influences found in the novels; major emphasis is on water, 'Indian' time, and the trickster figures. Chapter two examines Erdrich's juxtaposition of Catholic and Chippewa religions over four generations of fictional assimilation. Chapter three demonstrates Erdrich's narrative technique with regard to specific motifs used in characterization: orphans, warriors, and twins. Chapter four relates Native American aesthetics to Erdrich's strong female characters and draws conclusions on the use of three backgrounds to create her art.

1891.   Ley, R. D., Welle, P. G., & Bemidji State University. Dept. of Economics. (1995). The economic impact of Red Lake Reservation on the regional economy . [Bemidji? Minn.] : Dept. of Economics, Bemidji State University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 36483427
Abstract: "December 1995." Includes: Addendum A, Non-members purchases on the reservation, and Addendum B, Composition and financing of the housing stock: 2 sheets tipped in at end.

1892.   Libby, O. G. (1998). The Arikara Narrative of Custer's Campaign & the Battleof the Little Bighorn.  University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1893.   Libertus, S. (1996). Preview: The New Mille Lacs Indian Museum. Minnesota History, 55(1), 32.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1894.   Card Catalog. (1986). Library of Congress.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

1895.   Library Services Institute for Minnesota Indians (1969 : University of Minnesota. (1969). An annotated bibliography of selected materials : collected and reviewed cooperatively by the University of Minnesota, the State Department of Education, the Minnesota Indian Education Committee, in conjunction with other members of the Indian community : to be made available under public law 89-10 Title II . St. Paul : Library Services Institute for Minnesota Indians.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 3898600. Cover title.  Other: Antell, Wilfred Denis, 1935- University of Minnesota. Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Minnesota Indian Education Committee.

1896.   Lieberman, L. (1973). Atomism and mobility among underclass Chippewas and Whites. Human Organization, 32 (4), 337-348.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIX (1975:250)

1897.   Lieberman, L. (1970). Labor force mobility in the underclass: opportunities, subculture and training among Chippewa and poor White. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.

1898.   Jacob. (1953). [photoprint: b&w].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 20327439.  View of a young Indian boy standing in a doorway.

1899.   (1950). [photoprints].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24095966

1900.   Young girl. (1953). [photoprint: b&w].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 20327220
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

1901.   Limerick, P. N. (1988). The legacy of conquest: the unbroken past of the American west. New York: Norton.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1902.   Linch, L. K. (1954). The history of the Pipestone Indian Shrine and National Monument.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 10502260. Cover title.

1903.   . (1862). A. Lincoln, 1809-1865Message of the President of the United States in answer to a resolution of the Senate of the 5th instant in relation to the Indian barbaraties in Minnesota . Washington: G.P.O.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25279487. Read, referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs, and ordered to be printed, Dec. 11, 1862. Title from caption.

1904.   Lindblad, O. (1997). Full of fair hope : a history of St. Mary's Mission, Red Lake, Minnesota . St. Joseph, MN : O. Lindblad.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Other: St. Mary's Mission (Red Lake, Minn.)

1905.   Lips, E. (1957). Die Reisernte der Ojibwa-Indianer; Wirtschaft und Recht eines Erntevolkes [The rice harvest of the Ojibwa Indians, economy and law of a harvesting people. Berlin: Deutsche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Völkerkundliche Forschungen der Sektion für Völkerkunde und deutsche Volkskunde.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. III (1959:3-1712)

1906.   Lisitsky, G. (1956). Four ways of being human. New York: The Viking Press.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "An introduction to Anthropology.  Describes four tribes living in various lands and climates, and demonstrates the way mankind develops cultures to make use of the environment.  Grades 10-12."

1907.   Lithman, Y. G. (1978). The community apart: a case study of a Canadian Indian reserve community. Stockholm: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Stockholm.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXIV (1981:121)

1908.   Littlefield, A. (1996). The White Earth Tragedy: Ethnicity and Dispossession at a Minnesota Anishinaabe Reservation, 1889-1920 (book reviews). Ethnohistory, 43(1), 189 (2).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [review]

1909.   Lloyd, D. (1991). An evaluation of a cross-age tutoring project for at-risk high school American Indian students . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Bemidji State University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23250947

1910.   Loew, P. A. (1999). Newspapers and the Lake Superior Chippewa in the 'unprogressive' era (progressive era, Wisconsin). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Abstract: This dissertation focuses on the role of newspapers in brokering change within Chippewa communities in Wisconsin during the Progressive Era. It looks specifically at the Odanah Star and A-ni-shi-na-be E-na-mi-ad, early twentieth century periodicals published by Chippewa tribal members. It argues that although these Indian newspapers sometimes advocated an assimilationist agenda, they crusaded for much-needed reforms in Indian policy and played a significant role in defending Indian treaty rights. Very little scholarship exists about Native newspapers in this era--the “Dark Ages of Indian Journalism” as Sharon Murphy so aptly described it. During a time when recorded history  is almost always filtered through white eyes, the Odanah Star and A-ni-shi-na-be E-na-mi-ad represent significant, yet overlooked Indian sources that help us understand how Chippewa communities coped with assaults on their cultural integrity and attempted to assert their sovereignty. These newspapers reinforce the notion that the Chippewa were not one-dimensional victims of repressive government policies, but acted creatively to adjust to the changes  that were forced upon them in ways that improved the quality of their lives. This study also examines the role mainstream newspapers played in coverage of a 1909 United States Senate investigation into corruption and abuses within the La Pointe Chippewa Indian Agency. It argues that white newspapermen were preoccupied with partisanship and did not address the issues that mattered most to the Chippewa: land allotment and treaty rights. Along with discussions about boarding school life, lumber company abuses, and treaty rights, this study offers social history: baseball, silent movies, and wild west shows. It is intended to help fill the void in scholarship that exists about the critical period in American Indian history between the General Allotment Act of 1887 and World War I and to present the Chippewa as the multi-dimensional people they were at the turn of the century.

1911.   Loew, P. (1998). The Back of the Homefront: Black and American Indian Women in Wisconsin during World War II. Wisconsin Magazine of History, 82(2), 83.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1912.   Loew, P. (1997). Hidden Transcripts in the Chippewa Treaty Rights Struggle: A Twice Told Story: Race, Resistance, and the Politics of Power. American Indian Quarterly, 21(4), 713.
Notes: Source: UnCover
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [full text available]
Abstract: The controversy over the 1837 Chippewa Treaty Rights provides a framework in which to study competing views about the meaning of treaties and the competition between public texts and hidden agendas. The Treaty ceded Native American lands to the US government, but the nature of the agreement was disputed. Native Americans believed they still retained rights to fish and hunt on the land. Chippewas in the 1980s and 1990s challenged the US government's interpretations of the treaty.

1913.   Loew, P. (1990). Interview with Nick Hockings, Lac du Flambeau spearfisherman [television documentary]. WKOW (ABC) .
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997).

1914.   Loew, P. (1997). Natives, newspapers, and "fighting Bob": Wisconsin Chippewa in the "unprogressive" era. Journalism History, 23(4), 149 (10).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: The Progressive Era was a painful period for Native Americans. US officials assumed that allotment and detribalization solved the Indian problem in that they would learn to live as whites. However, for Wisconsin's Chippewa, assimilation carried a terrible price. Whites used government authority against Indians, corruption was widespread, and allotment was in a terrible condition. Newspaper coverage of government hearings held in 1909 is discussed.

1915.   Lommel, A. (1966). Shamanism: the beginnings of art. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1916.   . (1810). J. J. Long (Indian trader), Voyages chez differentes nations sauvages de l'Amerique septentrionale renfermant des detrails curieux sur les moeurs, usages, ceremonies religieuses, le systeme militaire, etc., des Cahnuagas, des Indiens de Cinq et Six Nations, Mohawks, Connecedagas, Iroquois, etc., des Indiens Chippeways, et autres sauvages de diverses tribus ... avec un etat exact des postes situes sur le fleuve St- Laurent, le lac Ontario, etc., etc.  [Voyages and travels of an Indian interpreter and trader] Edition de 1794 ed., ). Paris: Chez Lebel et Guitel, libraires .
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), Errata--P. xxxvi. Published in London in 1791 with title: Voyages and travels of an Indian interpreter and trader. Includes different Indian phrases and vocabulary.   Other: Billecocq, J. B. L. J. (Jean Baptiste Louis Joseph), 1765-1829

1917.   Long, J. (1904). Voyages and travels of an Indian interpreter and trader. Cleveland: Arthur H. Clark.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "[I] (M)", page 2, item 23

1918.   Long, J. (1791). Voyages & Travels of an Indian Interpreter & Trader Describing the Manners & Customs of the North American Indians: with an account of posts situated on the river Saint Laurence, Lake Ontario, &c : to which is added a vocabulary of the Chippeway language ... a list of words in the Iroquois, Mohegan, Shawanee, and Esquimeaux tongues, and a table, shewing the analogy between the Algonkin and Chippeway languages . London: [printed for the author, and sold by Robson ].
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999
Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

1919.   (1998). M. K. Long, & L. A. Rose (producers), & M. Lautanen-Raleigh. (writer). St. Germain, WI : DeltaVision Entertainment.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)
Abstract: Displays the existance of an intertribal strategy of cooperation to preserve and enhance natural resources for the increased use, sport, recreation and enjoyment of natives and visitors in the Lake Superior Region of the Great Lakes. VHS.

1920.   Longclaws, L., Barnes, G. E., Grieve, L., & Dumoff, R. (1980). Alcohol and Drug Use Among the Brokenhead Ojibwa. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 41(1), 21-36.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1921.   Longie, J. S., 1908- . (1953). Chief Blackbird's Indian fishing, trapping, hunting secrets and stories; including formulas, baits, scents, pictures, illustrations, stories and secrets never told. Minneapolis: Cree Indian Publishing Company .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25480294

1922.   Longie, J. S., 1908- . (1971). The chief's scrapbook, Indian ways : American Indian stories, legends, reservation life . Minneapolis: Cree Indian Publishing Company.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 3817476. Cover title.

1923.   Longie, J. D. (1984). Alcohol and American Indian children: an assessment of attitudes and behavior. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University.
Abstract: The purpose of this research was to examine the attitudes and behavior of preadolescent Indian children toward alcohol use. The sample consisted of 73 elementary school children between the ages of eight and twelve. The sample was selected from four different Indian communities in the upper Midwest United States. The four Indian communities comprised one urban city and one reservation from Minnesota, a reservation from North Dakota, and a rural non-reservation locality from Wisconsin. The sites represented distinctly different community lifestyles. The instrument consisted of a structured interview form. It contained 97 questions that were administered by trained interviewers employed for data collection.
Collected data were hand-scored and processed through the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) to test statistical significance and strength of association. This study identified eight children with some alcoholic beverage consumption experience, 18 children indicated they will try drinking in the future, and 44 that had not and would not drink. Also, several predictor variables were crosstabulated with drinking attitudes and behavior and several associations were identified. Significant relationships were found for community location and age. In both reservation areas and the rural non-reservation community, the majority of children were strictly non-drinkers. But the pattern was reversed for the urban area where the majority of children were drinkers or potential drinkers. By age, the general attitudinal progression was essentially linear, with drinkers increasing proportionately from eight to twelve year olds. By age twelve, positive predispositions toward drinking clearly predominated, with drinkers and potential drinkers outnumbering non-drinkers three to one. An assessment was made between attitude toward school and drinking behavior. It was found that children who liked school or liked their teachers were less likely to be drinkers or potential drinkers. Several socialization variables proved significant. Of those children indicating that their mothers drink, 65% indicated they did drink or would drink also. Of those that reported parents drink too much, 67% drink. Those children that indicated that their parents never drink too much, 83% stated they will not drink in the future. The majority of children indicated that they wanted to be like their parents in most ways. . . . (Author's abstract exceeds stipulated maximum length. Discontinued here with
permission of author.) UMI

1924.   Lopez, D. (1999). Tohono O'Odham language maintenance (Tohono O'Odham text). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Prescott College (Master of Arts Program).
Abstract: The thesis is about the Tohono O'odham tribe of Arizona wit emphasis on the possibility of language loss. The thesis is written in the Tohono O'odham language. The thesis begins by mentioning the pre-European O'odham and their lifestyle. It includes their territory, language, culture, religion, and diet. Next it cites the changes the tribe has gone through with the arrival of the Spaniards, Mexicans, and Americans. It also mentions the Christianization effort by the Catholic missionaries such as Father Kino, Also mentioned is the language mixing with Mexican and English words with Tohono O'odham. As an example, the Ojibwe tribe in Canada are mentioned to show how they maintain their language. Ways are suggested to maintain O'odham language. The main point is the O'odham language will be lost unless specific steps are taken.

1925.   Loraas, R. J. (1959). Factors leading to the opening of the White Earth Chippewa Indian Reservation to whites . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Moorhead State College.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 10413769

1926.   Lorenz, J. G., & Smith, D. G. (1997). Distribution of Sequence Variation in the MtDNA Control Region of Native North Americans. Human Biology, 69(6), 749-776.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The distributions of mtDNA diversity within and/or among North American haplogroups, language groups, and tribes were used to characterize the process of tribalization that followed the colonization of the New World. Approximately 400 bp from the mtDNA control region of 1 Na-Dene and 33 Amerind individuals representing a wide variety of languages and geographic origins were sequenced. With the inclusion of data from previous studies, 225 native North American (284 bp) sequences representing 85 distinct mtDNA lineages were analyzed. Mean pairwise sequence differences between (and within) tribes and language groups were primarily due to differences in the distribution of three of the four major haplogroups that evolved before settlement of the New World. Pairwise sequence differences within each of these three haplogroups were more similar than previous studies based on restriction enzyme analysis have indicated. The mean of pairwise sequence differences between Amerind members of haplogroup A, the most common of the four haplogroups in North America, was only slightly higher than that for the Eskimo, providing no evidence of separate ancestry, but was about two-thirds higher than that for the Na-Dene. However, analysis of pairwise sequence divergence between only tribal-specific lineages, unweighted for sample size, suggests that random evolutionary processes have reduced sequence diversity within the Na-Dene and that members of all three language groups possess approximately equally diverse mtDNA lineages. Comparisons of diversity within and between specific ethnic groups with the largest sample size were also consistent with this outcome. These data are not consistent with the hypothesis that the New World was settled by more than a single migration. Because lineages tended not to cluster by tribe and because lineage sharing among linguistically unrelated groups was restricted to geographically proximate groups, the tribalization process probably did not occur soon after settlement of the New World, and/or considerable admixture has occurred among daughter populations.

1927.   Lorenz, J. G., & Smith, D. G. (1994). Distribution of the 9-Bp Mitochondrial DNA Region V Deletion Among North American Indians. Human Biology, 66(5), 777-788.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The deletion of a 9-bp segment from the intergenic region between the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase II gene and the lysine tRNA gene has been documented mainly in individuals of East Asian ancestry and in individuals from East Asian-derived populations (e.g., Polynesia). Among Native Americans the deletion is absent among Eskimos and northern Na-Dene populations and present among most Amerind populations [sensu Greenberg (1987); i.e., all Native Americans except Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene] that have been studied. To better characterize the frequency and distribution of the 9-bp deletion in North America, we surveyed more than 400 individuals from 59 tribes representing a variety of linguistic groups. The absence of the deletion among Eskimo and northern Na-Dene populations is confirmed. Among Amerind groups the deletion is present in all groups represented by more than six individuals. The geographic distribution of the frequencies of the deletion appears to be clinal in North America. The deletion is absent in the Arctic and Subarctic and reaches its highest frequency in the Southwest. This distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that the ancestors of the Amerinds and Na-Dene arrived in the New World by means of separate migrations. The presence of the 9-bp deletion in high frequencies in all the major linguistic groups in the Southwest suggests that migration among tribes was common. [References: 18]

1928.   Losure, M. (1997). Saving Ojibwe. Oshkaabewis Native Journal, 4(2), 57.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

1929.   Lovisek, J. A. (1994). Lac des Mille Lacs "dammed and diverted": an ethnohistorical study. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 25, 285-314.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1930.   Lovisek, J. A. (1993). Political evolution of the Boundary Waters Ojibwa. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 24, 280-305.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1931.   Lovisek, J. A. M. (1993). Ethnohistory of the Algonkian-speaking people of Georgian Bay: precontact to 1850 (Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, McMaster University (Canada).
Abstract: The Algonkian speaking peoples of Georgian Bay occupied the shoreline and island environment of eastern Lake Huron, in Georgian Bay, between the French and Severn Rivers. They were likely the product of a constant cultural flux of peoples who came to occupy the shores and islands of Georgian Bay perhaps as early as 1200 A.D., although the archaeological evidence is problematic. Often regarded by vague reference by historical observers who included them with the Nipissing and the Ottawa during the seventeenth century, The Georgian Bay Algonkian speaking peoples were likely peoples of various origin. During the nineteenth century they appear in the historical records as Mississauga, Ojibwa, and Potowatomi, although these are often political identifications. This study attempts to piece together the ethnohistory of the Georgian Bay Algonkian by presenting an ethnographic account dating from precontact times to 1850. The presence of Algonkian speaking poeples in the Georgian Bay region has largely been neglected by ethnohistorians. Identified as convenient trading partners  (Heidenreich 1971: 293), and economic dependents of the Huron  (Trigger 1976, 1: 168; 1985: 205), the Georgian Bay Algonkian speaking peoples have been considered to have had little influence in the region (Jenness 1932: 276). It is not surprising that little is known about them. Culturally, they have been relegated to a rather ethnographically ambiguous position in Great Lakes culture history. By examining the archaeological, environmental, and historical record this study argues that the Algonkian speaking peoples of Georgian Bay were strongly influenced by both their geographic and political position in an environment where year round subsistence was available from fishing, small game mammals, and corn (either traded or cultivated). This economy in turn, influenced their ritual, political and social organization. The extensive temporal depth of this adaptation is followed through an examination of regionally important historical influences, including a devastating war with the Iroquois, various fur trades, an influx of native immigration, government sponsored settlement programs, and land surrenders. Within this context, the history of the Algonkian speaking people of Georgian Bay achieved cultural definition.

1932.   Lowery, C. T. (1998). American Indian Perspectives on Addiction and Recovery. [Review] [18 Refs]. Health & Social Work, 23(2), 127-135.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The circle of tribal society is 'experienced from the inside.... When forced from the center, one is 'alienated, irritable, and lonely' (Deloria, 1970, p. 13). Social workers, as service providers and researchers in collaboration with the American Indian women they are privileged to serve, have a distinct opportunity for working toward health--the integration of the physical, the emotional, the spiritual--in the lives of women who seek help in treatment facilities for substance abuse. A genuine contribution to the health of the communities to which the women return and to the generations which follow is central to this opportunity and lies deep within the circle.  (18 Refs)  (Abstract by: Author)

1933.   Lowery, C. T. (1998). From the Outside Looking In: Rejection and Belongingness for Four Urban Indian Men in Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1944-1995. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 22(4), 361.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1934.   Lowery, C. T. (1999). A Qualitative Model of Long-Term Recovery for American Indian Women. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 2(1-2), 35-50, 23 refs, 1 illus.
Notes: Source: Family Studies Database [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 1999 search
Abstract: A developmental model of Indian women's long-term recovery (alcoholism) is proposed based on American Indian thought about health and healing and life histories of six urban Indian women in recovery for 3 to 12 years. The qualitative analysis identified four components of the recovery process including positive discontinuity, expanding the circle, reclaiming the mother, and developing new continuity. These components are supported by narrative analysis from the lives of a Yakama woman (Washington Plateau), a Nez Perce woman (Idaho), two Blackfeet women (Montana), and two Ojibway women (North Dakota). (RKC)

1935.   Lowery, C. T. (1995). Life histories: addiction and recovery of six Native American women (women addicts). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Washington.
Abstract: Little is known about the alcohol addiction or the recovery of American Indian women. It is only recently, jarred by the impact of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE) on reservations that Indian women's drinking is now being studied. In this study, the lives of six urban Native American women abstinent from alcohol and drugs from three to 12 years, are analyzed according to Strauss and Corbin's model of grounded theory. Based on this analysis of Indian women's lives, and in accordance with Eastern Cherokee, Ottawa, and Ojibwa Native American medicine wheels, a model of long-term recovery for Native American women is proposed. Centered on healing the spirit, the components of the model include Positive Discontinuity or breaking the pattern; Expanding the Circle, re-connecting in our relationships; Reclaiming the Mother, a metaphor for acknowledging the realities of the past; and Developing a New Continuity, contributing to a future for Indian people. Antonovsky's salutogenic theory 'a sense of coherence' is
 explored for fit. This theory focuses on the origins of health and incorporates a cultural and environmental perspective congruent with Native American thought about health and lifeways.

1936.   Lowery, G. A. (1988). Performance of the tutored Indian student for grades four, five and six of the Chippewa Hills school district, Remus, Michigan (Native American). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Central Michigan University.
Abstract: The design of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the Indian Education tutoring at the Chippewa Hills School District in terms of performance on the Stanford Achievement Test, attendance at school and teacher attitudes of the program. Data were analyzed in the academic areas of math and reading for grades four, five, and six in the years 1984 through 1986. The results of comparisons were mixed. Of the students in the study who had not been tutored in the previous year, most showed better progress after having been tutored than in the year they were not. The results of the teacher survey indicated that teachers were positive toward  the Indian Education program. Recommendations as a result of the study include re-examination of goals, careful screening of potential students suitability, more contact time with students by tutors in math and reading.

1937.   Lowie, R. H. The Northern Shoshone.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1938.   Lucas, E. (1994). The Ojibwas: People of the Northern Forests.  Millbrook Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1939.   Lucille, T., 1910-  , & Beney, G. d. (1976). Contes et legendes du Canada  francais . Montreal : Editions Paulines.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

1940.   Lunbeck, C. J. (1972). CUA Census Report: Indian Population in Douglas County.  University of Nebraska at Omaha, Center for Public Affairs Research.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1941.   Lund, B. (1997). The Ojibwa Indians.  Capstone Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1942.   Lund, D. R.(Duane Richard), 1926- . (1977). Tales of four lakes : Leech Lake, Gull Lake, Mille Lacs Lake, the Red lakes & the Crow Wing River . Staples, Minn.  Nordell Graphic Communications.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

1943.   Lundgren, A. L. (1983). New site productivity estimates for red pine in the Lake States. Journal of Forestry , 81, 714-717, bibl., il.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota Biological & Agricultural Index [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

1944.   Lundquist, M. (1994). Melvin Losh: Reviving A Tradition. Piecework, 2(6), 74.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)
Abstract: An accomplished Ojibwe Quillworker renews a woodland craft.

1945.   . (1999). L. Lunge-Larsen, & M. Preus The Legend of the Lady Slipper: An Ojibwa Tale .
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [review]

1946.   Lupold, H. F. (1975). The Forgotten People: The Woodland Erie.  Exposition-Phoenix Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1947.   Lurie, N. O. (1962). Comments on Bernard J. James' analysis of Ojibwa acculturation. American Anthropologist, 64(4), 826-833.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. VIII (1963:104)

1948.   Lurie, N. O. (1972). Hickerson, H. The Chippewas and their neighbors. [book review]. American Journal of Sociology, 78(3), 731-733.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVIII (1974:44)

1949.   Lurie, N. O. (1987). Wisconsin Indians.  State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1950.   . (1951). N. O. Lurie (editor), Mountain Wolf Woman, the autobiography of a Winnebago Indian . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1951.   Lyford, C. A. (1943). Ojibwa Crafts. Lawrence, KS: Haskell Institute.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:102), "Bibliography"
Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. X (1966:55)
Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1952.   MacDonald, J. M. (1991). ‘Painting the Vision’- The Ojibwa nation in a new age. The Beaver, a Magazine of the North, 71(4), 49.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1953.   MacDonald, J. M. (1991). Undefeated: 300 years of Ojibwa history: first of a series. The Beaver, a Magazine of the North, 71(2), 28.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1954.   MacDonald, J. B., 1919- . (1974). Report of investigation of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources . Madison, Wis.  Governor's Citizen Committee.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Wisconsin. Dept. of Natural Resources. The Flambeau Road. Red Cedar Trail. The J. C. Campbell dump. Flambeau River State Forest "Big block". Port Industries. White River. Coleman Lake Club. Wausau dump
Abstract: The Flambeau Road -- Red Cedar Trail -- The J.C. Campbell dump -- Flambeau River State Forest "Big block" -- Port Industries -- White River -- Coleman Lake Club -- Wausau dump -- Summary report.

1955.   MacDonald, J. L., 1836-1903. (1888).  Indian appropriation bill; speech of Hon. J.L. MacDonald of Minnesota in the House of Representatives, April 14, 1888. Washington.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25322208

1956.   Macdonald, P. B., Black, G. B., & Mackenzie, R. (1990). Orthopedic Manifestations of Blastomycosis. Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - American, 72(6), 860-864.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The cases of seventy-two patients who had blastomycosis and were seen between 1926 and 1988 were retrospectively reviewed for involvement of the musculoskeletal system.  Most patients were from rural rather than urban areas (almost a 2:1 ratio), and an especially large number were from northwestern Ontario, Canada or were native Indians (primarily Ojibwa).  Bone was the second most common site of involvement (seventeen patients); in approximately one-half of these patients, the osseous site did not cause symptoms.  Metaphyses of long bones and small bones were involved the most; the metaphyseal lesions tended to be eccentric, well circumscribed, and lytic.  There were two deaths.sbd.the most recent, more than twenty years ago.sbd.of patients who had involvement of bones and joints; these patients, by modern standards, had had inadequate treatment. Treatment with amphotericin B and, more recently, with ketoconazole, in conjection with operative treatment, was very effective.

1957.   MacDorman, M. F., & Atkinson, J. O. (1998). Infant Mortality Statistics From the Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set--1995 Period Data. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 46(6 Suppl. 2), 1-22.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: This report presents infant mortality statistics from the linked birth/infant death data set (linked file)-1995 period data by a variety of maternal and infant characteristics. Trends in birthweight-specific infant mortality rates from 1985-95 are also discussed. METHODS: Descriptive tabulations of data from the linked file are presented. The data include infant deaths in 1995, which are linked to their corresponding birth certificates, whether the birth occurred in 1995 or 1994. The denominator used to compute infant mortality rates is the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) natality file, which includes all births in 1995. Data are weighted to compensate for the 2.5 percent of infant death records that could not be linked to their corresponding birth certificates. RESULTS: In general, mortality rates were lowest for infants born to Asian and Pacific Islander mothers, followed by white, American Indian, and black mothers. Rates for infants of Hispanic origin mothers were slightly lower than or comparable to those for infants of white mothers, except for infants of Puerto Rican mothers who had higher infant mortality rates. Infant mortality rates were higher for those infants whose mothers began prenatal care after the first trimester of pregnancy, were teenagers or 40 years of age or older, did not complete high school, were unmarried, or smoked during pregnancy. Infant mortality was also higher for male infants, multiple births, and infants born preterm or at low birthweight. In 1995, 63 percent of all infant deaths occurred to the 7.3 percent of infants born at low birthweight. From 1985-95, birthweight-specific infant mortality rates declined most rapidly for infants weighing 750-1,499 grams at birth. The leading causes of infant death varied considerably by race and Hispanic origin. For infants of black mothers, Disorders related to short gestation and unspecified low birthweight was the leading cause of infant death, with an infant mortality rate 4.5 times higher than that for infants of white mothers. For infants of American Indian mothers, rates for Sudden infant death syndrome were 2.9 times and for Accidents and adverse effects 3.6 times higher than those for infants of white mothers. For infants of Hispanic mothers, mortality rates from Sudden infant death syndrome were one-third lower than those for infants of white mothers.  (Abstract by: Author)

1958.   Macias, A. (1997). The Island of the Anishnaabeg - Thunderers and Water Monsters in the Traditional Ojibwe Life-World - Smith, T. S. Journal of the West, 36(3), 127.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

1959.   Macleod, D. P. (1995). Naval History of the Ojibwa of Lake-Superior (Canada). American Neptune, 55(4), 301-307.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

1960.   MacLeod, D. P. (1992). The Anishinabeg Point of View: The History of the Great Lakes Region to 1800 in Nineteenth-Century Mississauga, Odawa and Ojibway Historiography. The Canadian Historical Review, 73(2), 194.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

1961.   MacLeod, D. P. Meet some contemporary First Nations People. Nature Study.
Notes: Source: UnCover
Abstract: The Anishinabeg Point of View

1962.   MacLeod, D. P. (1995). Naval History of the Ojibwa of Lake Superior. The American Neptune, 55(4), 301.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1963.   MacLeod, D. P. (1994). 'Une conspiration generale': the exercise of power by the Amerincians of the Great Lakes during the War of the Austrian Succession, 1744-1748. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Ottawa (Canada).
Abstract: During the War of the Austrian Succession (1744-1748), four distinct groups--the British; the French; the Three Fires Confederacy (composed of the Odawa, Ojibwa, and Potawatomi), and an anti-French coalition sought to exercise power in the Great Lakes region. The British sought to enlist the Amerindians of the Lakes in their war against the French. The French attempted to mobilize Amerindians to attack British traders south of Lake Erie. Elements of some Amerindian nations formed a coalition which attempted to replace French with British traders in the Great Lakes region. The pro-French faction among the Three Fires Confederacy sought to avoid entanglement in French actions against the British south of Lake Erie, and to end the violence in the west. Of these groups, it was the Amerindians, particularly the Three Fires Confederacy, who proved capable of initiating and controlling events in the west. Their actions indicate that, in 1744-1748, the Amerindians of the Great Lakes retained their independence and freedom of action, and regarded European alliances as instruments of convenience, not subordination. Moreover, in spite of French pretensions to overlordship and overlapping European claims to Amerindian territory, the Three Fires Confederacy were the paramount power in the Great Lakes region in the mid-eighteenth century.

1964.   MacQuarrie, M. E. (1984). Determination of the antecedents of infant feeding practices and the effect of choice of infant feeding on subsequent health status of Canadian Ojibway infants and young children (Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Cornell University.
Abstract: This study investigated the nutritional status and health of Ojibway infants and young children in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Possible antecedents to infant feeding practices, especially breastfeeding, were explored as was the physical, social and cultural environment in order to identify and interpret factors other than breastfeeding, that influence child health. An ethnohistorical analysis provided the context in which current behaviours could be more clearly and readily understood. The analysis was three pronged: the first was an investigation of the differences between groups of hospitalized and non-hospitalized infants and young children to identify possible environmental antecedents to their hospitalization. The effect of breastfeeding on hospitalization for infection was explored. Secondly, Native womens role taking behaviour, current expectations of appropriate child care practices as well as social and cultural reinforcements for child care practices was examined. Intracultural diversity in task performance was stressed. Third, the ecology of nutrition of one and two year olds was explored and the extent and possible consequences of malnutrition, especially obesity, was examined. Data showed high rates of hospitalization for gastrointestinal and respiratory infections. These infections are the result of numerous interacting antecedents, including bottlefeeding, unsanitary environment and inappropriate child care practices. Despite the high incidence of infectious diseases there was little adverse effect on the nutritional status of the young children as measured by length, weight, arm circumference and subscapular and triceps fatfold thickness. Serum vitamin A levels, however, were indicative of moderate risk. Of concern was the prevalence of obesity in young children. Forty percent of the children between one and two years were above 110 percent weight-for-height of the NCHS reference mean. In order to analyse the complex and inter-related factors that affect infant health and infant feeding practices, especially breastfeeding, an ecological framework was developed. The model emphasized the dynamic nature of personal behaviour and illustrated that behaviours such as breastfeeding occur within the constraints of specific environmental contexts and within a particular social and cultural reality.

1965.   Maddox, J. L. (1923). The medicine man: a sociological study of the character and evolution of shamanism . New York: The Macmillan Company.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1966.   Madill, D. (1986). Rapport de recherches sur les traites,  Traite huit . Ottawa: Centre de la recherche historique et de  l'etude des traites, Affaires indiennes et du Nord  Canada.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: Titre de la couv.: Rapport de recherche sur  les traites, Traite huit. Publ. aussi en anglais sous le titre: Treaty research report,  Treaty Eight. "QS-3443-000-FF-A1"--Verso de p. de t. Bibliogr.: p. 155-162.

1967.   Madill, D. (1986). Treaty research report, Treaty Eight. Ottawa : Treaties and Historical Research  Centre, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: Issued also in French under title: Rapport  de recherches sur les traites, Traite huit. "QS-3443-000-EE-A1"--T.p. verso. Bibliography: p. 151-158.

1968.   Madison, J. (1958). Notes of Debates. W. Solberg (editor), The Federal Convention and the Formation of the Union  (p. 280).  Bobbs-Merrill.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

1969.   Magnuson, J. J. (1958). Some phases of the life history of troutperch, Percopsis omiscomaycus (Walbaum) in Lower Red Lake, Minnesota. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19382687

1970.   Mahoney, M. C., & Michalek, A. M. (1998). Health Status of American Indians/Alaska Natives: General Patterns of Mortality. Family Medicine, 30(3), 190-195.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Investigations of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations suggest patterns of mortality that differ from the general population. Mortality data reveal excess overall mortality among AI/ANs, as well as excesses for specific causes of death, including accidents, diabetes, liver disease, pneumonia/influenza, suicide, homicide, and tuberculosis. A relative deficit of deaths has been noted for heart disease, cancer, and HIV infections. It is important that physicians demonstrate cultural competence so they may provide quality medical care for the populations they serve. Activities such as provider education, risk assessment, and emphasis on preventive services are offered to facilitate integration into teaching curricula. Knowledge of distinctive mortality patterns among AI/ANs will help clinicians recognize the unique needs of these patients.  (Abstract by: Author)

1971.   Maisel, I. (1998). Streak busters.(Chippewas had scored in 167 straight games; Joe Hamilton had thrown 161 passes without an interception). Sports Illustrated, 89(11), 80 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: --Central Michigan's 38-0 loss to Iowa was its ninth in a row and ended the Chippewas' 167-game scoring streak, fourth longest in the nation. The longest scoring streaks: BYU (287), Texas (202) and Washington (193).  --Boston College linebacker Brian Maye's interception ended Georgia Tech quarterback Joe Hamilton's streak of 161 passes without an interception. The NCAA record is 271, set by Trent Dilfer of Fresno State during the 1993 season.

1972.   Malkus, A. (1963). There really was a Hiawatha. New York: Grosset and Dunlap.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "The life of the 16th century Ajmerican Indian whose ideals influenced the United States Constitution and earned him God-like reputation among his people.  Grades 5-8."

1973.   Malone, J. L. (1997). On reduplication in Ojibwa. Anthropological Linguistics, 39(3), 437-458.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XLIII (1998:53)
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: The incidence of prefixal reduplication is analyzed in 400-odd pages of traditional Ojibwa stories (Jones 1919), making for a total corpus of 275 items. The most prominent general function of this important derivational device is to convey expansiveness, a force that makes itself felt in time or space either "horizontally," in the case of repetitives, continuatives, and distributives or "vertically," in the case of energics. Less prominently represented than expansive forms are handicaptives and inceptives at least the latter of which may have arisen as a generalization of repetitive or continuative action (the more protracted an event, the more salient its beginning). The paper concludes with a brief discussion of reduplicated forms that may be losing their expansive force through lexicalization.
Author's Abstract: COPYRIGHT 1997 Indiana University

1974.   Malone, L. J. (1992). Opening the West: federal internal improvements before 1860 (settlement, frontier) . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New School for Social Research.
Abstract: Most economic historians assume, along the path cleared by Frederick Jackson Turner, that economic individualism shaped the West and its people. This dissertation proposes a different route.  Careful analysis of transportation expenditures from 1800 to 1860 reveals that the frontier was opened, before its extensive settlement, by a network of federal roads and improvements to rivers and harbors. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part One assembles data for federal internal improvements expenditures before 1860 and uses the principle of relative economic backwardness, which is associated with Alexander Gerschenkron, to suggest that federal expenditures substituted for private and state investment and accelerated settlement and growth in some Western states. Part Two looks at the placement of early federal internal improvements projects and their effects in both leading and determining the direction of settlement and growth in five states from a region described as the 'New West'. The states are: Arkansas, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. The findings show that the pace of settlement and growth accelerates in the New West after the construction of federal internal improvement projects. In addition, historical case studies of the development of counties from the region indicate that timber and agricultural output increased dramatically soon after settlement. Finally, new links appear between internal improvements and other forms of federal-led growth in the frontier. These include the placement of forts (which accompanied road construction), Indian cession policies, land grants to states to fund subsequent internal improvements, and the strategic location of public land sales offices. Tracking internal improvements expenditures in sparsely settled regions discloses the impact the federal government had in initiating growth in the relatively backward frontier--in advance of the more widely acknowledged railroad developments that occurred after mid-century. More generally, the path of federal-led growth that is turned up by the dissertation can be used to support other reappraisals of the laissez-faire argument on the formation of national markets in the United States.

1975.   Mancall, P. C. (1995). Men, Women, and Alcohol in Indian Villages in the Great Lakes Region in the Early Republic. Journal of the Early Republic, 15(3), 425.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

1976.   Mandelbaum, D. G. The Plains Cree.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1977.   Mankato State College. Urban and Regional Studies Institute. (1974). Indian Creek : an environmental assessment. [Mankato, Minn.] : Urban and Regional Studies Institute.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25106872
Abstract: Cover title. "April 18, 1974." "Final environmental assessment, flood control project at Indian Creek Slough and diversion channel, Mankato, Minnesota"--Summary. Prepared by the Environmental Institute and the Urban Studies Institute, Mankato State College.

1978.   Mann, A. Z. (Albert Zachariah), b. 1887. (1957). A mission to Indian Americans in the city : the summary report of a survey of the work of the United Church Committee on Indian Work among Indian people resettling in the Twin Cities . Minneapolis, Minn.  United Church Committee on Indian Work .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 20865786. Title from cover. "Survey under the auspices of: the United Church Committee on Indian Work (Minn.) and the Division of Home Missions, National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A."

1979.   Mannes, M. C. (1990). The perceptions of human service workers in planning for the implementation of the family preservation services innovation in Indian Child Welfare settings. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Cornell University.
Abstract: This exploratory research investigated the perceptions of human service workers planning to implement an innovative service project,  known as Family Preservation Services (FPS), in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the Rio Grande Corridor of New Mexico. The study had workers identify implementation issues that needed to be dealt with in order to implement an FPS project, work through a procedure to show interrelationships among the issues,  and rate the issues in terms of importance and ability to influence.  The ratings for various subgroups of human service workers were then compared. The research made use of a structured conceptualization research method known as Concept Mapping to gather and assess the perceptions of human service workers. Multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, mean rating scores, and t-tests were employed to analyze the data. Eighty-one implementation issues and six clusters, representing broader implementation concerns, were identified. The clusters and issues were able to be classified into those dealing with technical capacity matters and those attending to political feasibility factors.  Importance ratings were consistently higher than influence ratings.  The implementation clusters emphasizing technical capacity were rated as more important and more open to influence than the ones focusing on political feasibility. Political and technical issues directly tied to getting the project operational were seen as most important,  and those issues dealing with activities and forces beyond the human service organization and community were seen as least susceptible to influence. In comparing subgroup ratings there was strong similarity between workers from New Mexico and Michigan and Indians serving as either managers or direct service practitioners.  The largest degree of difference was found in comparing the ratings of Indian managers and non-Indian managers. A Powerlessness Index was devised to determine the relative degree of powerlessness human service workers feel about implementation issues and general implementation concerns. Based upon the research an initial conceptual framework for pre-implementation planning was presented.

1980.   Manzolillo, L. R. (1955). The American Indian in an urban situation: Minneapolis, Minnesota; a study in applied anthropology. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19386049

1981.   Maples, W. C., Atchley, J., Ashby, W., & Ficklin, T. (1990). An Epidemiological Study of the Ocular and Visual Profiles of Oklahoma Cherokees and Minnesota Chippewas. Journal of the American Optometric Association, 61(10), 784-788.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Over the last three decades some American Indian tribes in North America have received attention in the literature as a minority group with unique visual characteristics. Studies on the refractive status of Indians have shown an increase of refractive errors and particularly an abnormally high prevalence, and amount of, with-the-rule astigmatism. These changes appear to have taken place over the last 40 years. Eskimos, on the other hand, have recently showed an astoundingly high incidence of myopia. Other Native American tribes do not show dramatic changes in myopia or astigmatism. The Public Health Service-Indian Health Service, as an ongoing aspect of their responsibilities to Native Americans, perform screenings on children. This study reports the results of visual screenings primarily of Oklahoma Cherokee and Minnesota Chippewa children.  (Abstract by: Author)

1982.   Marach, V., 1945- . (1978). An analysis of Beaver Indian and Alaskan Eskimo myths a comparative approach . Ottawa: National Library of Canada.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

1983.   Marbella, A. M., Harris, M. C., Diehr, S., Ignace, G., & Ignace, G. (1998). Use of Native American Healers Among Native American Patients in an Urban Native American Health Center. Archives of Family Medicine, 7(2), 182-185.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Abstract: To gain an understanding of the prevalence, utilization patterns, and practice implications of the use of Native American healers together with the use of physicians, we conducted semistructured interviews at an urban Indian Health Service clinic in Milwaukee, Wisc, of a convenience sample of 150 patients at least 18 years old. The mean age of patients was 40 years, and the sex distribution was 68.7% women and 31.3% men. Thirty tribal affiliations were represented, the largest groups being Ojibwa (20.7%), Oneida (20.0%), Chippewa (11.3%), and Menominee (8.0%). We measured the number of patients seeing healers and gathered information on the types of healers, the ceremonies used for healing, the reasons for seeing healers, and whether patients discuss with their physicians their use of healers. We found that 38.0% of the patients see a healer, and of those who do not, 86.0% would consider seeing one in the future. Most patients report seeing a healer for spiritual reasons. The most frequently visited healers were herbalists, spiritual healers, and medicine men. Sweat lodge ceremonies, spiritual healing, and herbal remedies were the most common treatments. More than a third of the patients seeing healers received different advice from their physicians and healers. The patients rate their healer's advice higher than their physician's advice 61.4% of the time. Only 14.8% of the patients seeing healers tell their physician about their use. We conclude that physicians should be aware that their Native American patients may be using alternative forms of treatment, and they should open a respectful and culturally sensitive dialogue about this use with their patients.  (Abstract by: Author)

1984.   Marcus, G. E. (1986). Anthropology as cultural critique: an experimental moment in the human sciences. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

1985.   Marderosian, A. D., & Yelvigi, M. S. (1976). Medicine and Drugs in Colonial America. Am. J. Pharm.  148, 113-120.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The existence and development of American drugs and medicines from 1600 to 1800, are discussed.

1986.   Margolin, D. R. (1996). Making It Their Own - Severn Ojibwe Communicative Practices - Valentine, L. P. Journal of Anthropological Research, 52(4), 510-512.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

1987.   Maristuen-Rodakowski, J. (1988). Turtle Mountain Reservation in North Dakota: its history as depicted in Louise Erdrich's Love Medecine and Beet Queen. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 12(3), 33-48.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org  via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

1988.   Markel, M. (1999). Violence, resistance and myth in the texts of Silko, Kingston, Mukherjee and Erdrich (Leslie Marmon Silko, Maxine Hong Kingston, Bharati Mukherjee, Louise Erdrich). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, City University of New York.
Abstract: My thesis  examines literary violence in the works of four American women writers from distinct ethnic groups: Ceremony (Leslie Marmon Silko); Woman Warrior (Maxine Hong Kingston); Jasmine (Bharati Mukherjee); and Tracks and Love Medicine (Louise Erdrich). I propose that the violence in each work is rooted in feminism and functions as an expression of revolt against patriarchal suppression. Each author's shaping of violence relates directly to her ethnic background. Both Kingston, who is Chinese-American, and Mukherjee, an East-Indian immigrant, have grown up in a misogynist society where the very act of writing defies their culture's admonishment to be silent and passive. Their characters fight centuries-old traditions of repression, as well as the prejudice of the dominant white society, to develop selfhood and independence. Erdrich, of Chippewa and German-American descent, explores generations of Chippewas living on land reservations where violence issues from the context of a dysfunctional community and its ensuing problems&alcoholism, abandoned children, lives displaced and extracted from their roots. Her description of the rape and abuse of women echoes the rape of Indian land and heritage. Silko, who also writes from a mixed-blood heritage (Laguna/Mexican/white), differs from the others in that her culture is matriarchal. Thus, her assessment of the role of violence contrasts theirs: she represents violence not as a tool of justice and empowerment but as a form of witchery corrupting those who employ it. Despite the ethnic differences of the authors, their novels share similar themes: violence and resistance in cultural adaptations; the clash of values and traditions; the quest for self-definition in the context of repressive and conflicting social values; generational and gender conflict; nature as a reflection of internal violence and as a metaphor for reconciliation and transcendence; the potential of violence to intimidate, diminish, corrupt as well as to liberate and empower. Moreover, in creating her work of mixed genre, each author subverts and revises a traditional literary form: the memoir (Woman Warrior), the Western (Ceremony), the female bildüngsroman (Jasmine) and the Christian life of the saints (Tracks, Love Medicine). My study will demonstrate how the use of violence in each work effectively critiques and redefines the particular genre and how it shapes the reader's consciousness of gender and social justice both within the specific ethnic context and within the larger framework of the dominant American culture.

1989.   Marriot, A. (1977). Plains Indian Mythology.  NAL Dutton.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1990.   Marriott, A. (1958). Ribbon appliqué work of north American Indians, part I. Bulletin of Oklahoma Anthropological Society, IV(March), 49-59.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

1991.   Marsh, C. (1996). Michigan Indian Dictionary for Kids!  Gallopade International.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1992.   Marsh, C. (1996). Minnesota Indian Dictionary for Kids!  Gallopade International.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1993.   Marsh, C. (1996). Wisconsin Indian Dictionary for Kids!  Gallopade International.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

1994.  
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995):
[T]he rights of the original inhabitants were ... to a considerable extent, impaired.  Their rights to complete sovereignty, as independent nations, were necessarily diminished, ... denied by the original fundamental principle, that discovery gave exclusive title to those [European Christians] who made it.  While the different nations of Europe respected the rights of the natives, as occupants, they asserted the ultimate dominion to be in themselves; and claimed and exercised, as a consequence of their ultimate dominion, a power to grant the soil, while yet in possession of the Indian right of occupancy. ...  So early as the year 1496, her [England's] monarch granted a commission to the Cabots, to discover countries then unknown to Christian people, and to take possession of them in the name of England.  Two years afterwards, Cabot proceeded on this voyage, and discovered the continent of North America, along which he sailed as far south as Virginia. 
To this discovery the English trace their title. ...Thus has our whole country been granted by the crown while in the occupation of the Indians.  These grants purport to convey the soil as well as the right of dominion to the grantees ...

1995.   Martens, P. J., & Young, T. K. (1997). Determinants of Breastfeeding in Four Canadian Ojibwa Communities: a Decision-Making Model. American Journal of Human Biology, 9(5), 579-593.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Abstract: A prospective cohort study was conducted to determine the patterns of breastfeeding and factors associated with breastfeeding choice and duration among Canadian Aboriginal (Ojibwa) women from third trimester to 12 weeks postpartum. The survey included demographic, obstetric and infant feeding information, measures of 'breastfeeding beliefs,' 'breastfeeding confidence,' and 'referent support.' Thirty-six Treaty-status women, living in or near four Manitoba First Nations communities, were interviewed prenatally and subsequently gave birth to a live infant between December 1993 and June 1994. Demographic, obstetric and infant feeding information from 20 women who missed the prenatal interview were obtained retrospectively. The overall response rate was 98% of eligible women. Outcome measures included initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Explanatory variables included factors associated with breastfeeding initiation/duration, based on a revision of the Ajzen and Fishbein (1980) decision-making model. Breastfeeding rates were 57% (initiated), 44% (week 1), 32% (week 4), and 18% (week 12). The decision-making model demonstrated construct validity for breastfeeding choice. Multivariate modelling indicated 'prenatal intent' and 'breastfeeding confidence' as best predictors of breastfeeding choice. Best predictors of duration were 'satisfaction with breastfeeding at 2 weeks' and 'postpartum referent scores.' 'Satisfaction' was negatively correlated with the number of verbalized problems. Reasons for weaning included 'insufficient milk' and 'soreness.' Community intervention programs could focus on breastfeeding beliefs, confidence and referent support, and decrease early weaning by screening for preventable problems.

1996.   . (1979). J. Martin, & J. AschenbrennerReminiscences of Jerry Martin, Mille Lacs band of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22906261

1997.   Martin, J. (1975). [Letter to Clara NiiSka].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Personal communication, Dr. John Martin, with specific documentation regarding canyonlands in Utah.  Dr. Martin mentioned that the decimation of the beaver destroyed the flood controls which were a part of the Aboriginal Indigenous ecosystem; after the root structure of the grasslands was damaged by grazing, in some areas the fertile bottomlands "where Utes [sic] harvested the perennial grain crop by knocking it directly into their baskets from the standing grasses" were eroded areas the fertile bottomlands "where Utes [sic] harvested the perennial grain crop by knocking it directly into their baskets from the standing grasses" were eroded down to canyon bedrock.

1998.   Martin, L. L. (1989). Modernism preferences and participation patterns among American Indian adults, staff and board members in two types of community service agencies in Minneapolis (Minnesota). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University.
Abstract: A comparative study which corresponded to Joseph Kahl's previous work on modernism-traditionalism was developed to examine the differences between Indian adults and personnel  (boards and staffs) of two community service agencies in Minneapolis. The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine whether the mean modernism score of an American Indian adult community differs from the mean modernism scores of staffs and boards of two urban service programs, one of which employs structured approaches and the other using unstructured approaches; and second, to investigate how such differences relate to the rate of  participation of American Indian adults in services provided by the programs. Analysis of the data using an analysis of variance indicated that there were significant differences among the mean modernism scores of Indian adults, staff, and board members of  Waite House, seen as a structured agency. The key difference was between Indian adults and board members. Further analysis using a t-test indicated a significant difference between the mean modernism scores of the board of Waite House, a structured agency, and the board of Park Board, seen as an unstructured agency. An additional significant finding using multiple regression correlation analysis
score in relation to participation such that the more traditional Indian adults tended to participate more in the structured agency with the modern board than in the unstructured agency with the traditional  board. The opposite was found for modern Indians who tended to participate more in the unstructured agency with the traditional board than in the structured agency with the modern board. These findings should not be generalized to every social and educational community service agency in urban areas. But the results do have some implications for agencies that serve American Indian populations.

1999.   Martin, S. R. (1994). Ojibwa Narratives of Kawbawgam,Charles, Kawbawgam,Charlotte and Lepique,Jacques, 1893-1895 - Bourgeois,Ap, Editor. Michigan Historical Review, 20(2), 207-208.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2000.   Martin, T. J. (1987). A faunal analysis of Fort Ouiatenon, an eighteenth-century trading post in the Wabash Valley of Indiana (zooarchaeology, fur trade, French regime). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: The small and often remote fur trade posts established by New France on the western frontier were the economic basis for the French colonial fur trade during first half of the eighteenth century.  Despite their significance, the historical and documentary records contain little information concerning the mundane economic pursuits and subsistence activities that occurred at these obscure outposts.  According to Tordoff('1), functional differences between various levels of the French colonial fur trade network should be discernable in the archaeological record. One of her hypotheses states that greater dependence on domesticated animals will be reflected at fur trade sites that functioned as regional distribution centers in comparison to sites that represent local distribution centers. An assemblage of over 11,000 identified animal remains from Fort Ouiatenon reveals that locally available wild animal resources were prevalent in the subsistence economy of the upper Wabash River Valley local distribution center. A variety of quantitative techniques show that species composition of the midden does not vary significantly from buried refuse deposits, and that there were few significant changes in animal exploitation patterns over time. Fort Ouiatenon exhibits a distinctive contrast to Fort de Chartes I  (Laurens site), an example of a regional distribution center in the Illinois country, in that domesticated species were only supplemental at the Wabash Valley post. Furthermore, animal remains modified into tools suggest considerably more interaction with local Indian populations at the local distribution center. The study reveals that animal remains can furnish a perspective on daily activities often not possible with other archaeological materials. ('1)Judith Dunn Tordoff, An Archaeological Perspective on the Organization of the Fur Trade in Eighteenth Century New France (East Lansing:  Michigan State University, Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, 1983).

2001.   . (1975). D. Martinson, & Duluth Indian Education Advisory CommitteeReal wild rice  . Duluth : Duluth Indian Education Advisory Committee.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-05179770

2002.   Martinson, L. R. (1965). A comparison of Indian dropout and Indian graduating students at the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, St. Cloud State College.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7827124

2003.   film. B. Mason (producer)National Film Board Of Canada.
Notes: Source: Family Studies Database [University of Minnesota online databases], August 1999 search
Abstract: In a natural sequel to his four films on canoeing. Techniques, Bill Mason, well known conservationist and award winning filmaker, has produced song of the paddle. A lyrical account of his family's canoeing holiday on the ancient Ojibway waterways into Lake Superior.

2004.   Mason, C. I. (1988). Introduction to Wisconsin Indians: Prehistory to Statehood.  Sheffield Publishing Company.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2005.   Massie, L. B. (1994). The Writings of Major Robert Rogers. Michigan History, 78(2), 38.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Famous for has daredevil raids during the French and Indian War, Major Robert Rogers was also a popular author who wrote about has adventures on the Great Lakes frontier.

2006.   Massie, L. B. (1994). The Writings of Major Robert Rogers. Michigan History, 78(2), 38.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Famous for has daredevil raids during the French and Indian War, Major Robert Rogers was also a popular author who wrote about has adventures on the Great Lakes frontier.

2007.   Massmann, P. G. (1997). A neglected partnership: the general federation of women's clubs and the conservation movement, 1890-1920 (women's clubs). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Connecticut.
Abstract: By studying middle- and upper-class clubwomen's involvement in the Progressive Era movement to conserve America's natural resources, this dissertation seeks to understand how women developed a public role for themselves during the twenty years prior to suffrage. Working through the General Federation of Women's Clubs (GFWC) and various state federations, clubwomen took an interest in virtually every aspect of conservation, from forestry to scenic preservation. Using their ability to influence public opinion, clubwomen created a niche for themselves by lobbying for conservation legislation at the local, state, and federal levels of government. Their success in the art of persuasion changed many a Congressman's mind, and consequently turned these women leaders into an important liaison between legislators and their constituencies.  The dissertation is organized around the chronological developmentof clubwomen's interest in the conservation of natural resources. With the formation of the GFWC in 1890, and of the various state federations from 1892 on, clubwomen significantly increased their opportunities for volunteer activism. Small local clubs worked to plant trees and clean up city streets, and a few state federations,  most notably Colorado and New Jersey, endeavored to protect scenic areas from degradation. Then, in 1902, the GFWC appointed a standing committee on Forestry and clubwomen's  attention shifted from the state to the federal level of government. Through their efforts to protect the Chippewa forest in Minnesota, the forests of the White Mountains in New Hampshire, and the sequoias of California, clubwomen became increasingly conscious of the importance of the federal government in protecting national forests and parks. Between 1908 and 1914, interest in protecting America's natural resources shifted from 'forestry' to 'conservation,' and clubwomen broadened their efforts to include waterways, soil erosion, minerals, good roads and national parks. World War I forced clubwomen to concentrate on war work at the expense of conservation projects, but during the 1920s, clubwomen continued their work for natural resources along the lines established around 1910.

2008.   Matson, E. N. (1972). Legends of the great chiefs. Nashville: T. Nelson.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Nisqualli legends, as remembered by P. Leschi: Cougar, Wildcat, and the giant; Blue Jay and the moon legend; Coyote and the witches.--Oglala Sioux legends, recalled from the days of Chief Red Cloud: Legend of the peace pipe; Legend of the Wind Cave; Legend of Crazy Horse.-- Sitting Bull legends, as told by Frank White Buffalo Man: Iktomi and the ducks; The maiden who lived with the wolves; Legend of the horse; Legend of Standing Rock.--Chief Joseph's favorite Nez Perce legends, as told before the tragic Trail of Tears: Coyote and the monster; The serpent of Wallowa Lake.--Snohomish lesson legends, from the family of Chief W. Shelton: Arrows and the sun; Legend of Sway-Uock; Legend of Doh-kwi-Buhch.--Legends told by the Makah, as remembered by the daughter of Chief Swan: Ishcus and the clamshell boy; Kwatee and the wolf; Legend of Kwatee.-- Legends of the Canoe Indians, as told by Chief M. Sampson: The first Quedelish; Universal story of the Sasquatch; Raven and the Pheasant; Legend of the Sasquatch

2009.   Matthiessen, P. (1984). On the River Styx. New York: Random House.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

2010.   May, P. A. (1987). Suicide Among American Indian Youth: a Look at the Issues. Children Today , 16(4), 22-25.
Notes: Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search.  (15 Ref)

2011.   May, R. M. (1980). Cree-Ojibwa Hunting And The Hare-Lynx Cycle. Nature, 286(5796), 108-109.

2012.   Maynard, M. H. (1996). Ojibwa Lake Superior: a personal perspective (original artwork). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, York University (Canada).
Abstract: Complementing the exhibit 'Lake Superior: A Personal Perspective', the focus of this paper is the influence on the author of individuals and events connected to this greatest of the Great Lakes. Featuring a narrative that is primarily personal, it also includes documentation of Lake Superior's proud history, cultural significance and unique geography. Three important experiences form the basis of investigations into these personal influences. Beginning in 1960, they include a boyhood indoctrination to northern wilderness in Fort William (Thunder Bay); an introduction to Ojibwa culture through a chance meeting with artist and author Selwyn Dewdney; and a new appreciation of the spiritual significance of wilderness during a canoeing/camping trip along Lake Superior's north shore in 1978.  Complementing this personal perspective, other narratives include descriptions of relevant historical, cultural and geographic facts about the Lake Superior watershed. Finally, an overview of the exhibit 'Lake Superior: A Personal Perspective' is included, with a comprehensive listing of work and artifacts in Appendix 2.

2013.   Mayor, J. L. (1994). The mountain that I take away with me: Native healing and health care amongst northwestern Ontario Ojibway. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada).
Abstract: This thesis looks at Native healing and health care, particularly in the context of the programmes in the Kenora area. The research is based on several personal interviews conducted in the summer of 1992. The paper begins with a brief discussion of the history of Native political policy, particularly in regards to health care. The theoretical framework is based on the work of Arthur Kleinman, an anthropologist/ethnographer who explores the borderland between medicine, anthropology and psychiatry, and the ideas of Dr. Ed Connors, a Native and a psychologist in Kenora. The model, of the author's own construction, argues that health care is a culturally constructed reality. The thesis then explores the Native worldview concepts of health, sickness and healing, including a discussion of some of the ceremonies and rituals used, and the debate over sharing healing knowledge with the western world. The last section discusses Kenora, where Native people are actively involved in healing the communities of the area. Kenora provides a working case study for the 'integration by association' of Western health care methods and Native healing methods. It represents a viable alternative of culturally appropriate and sensitive healing. The conclusion considers some of the impediments to implementing such an approach nationwide.

2014.   Mazena'igan Bookstore (Minneapolis, Minn.). (1990). [Catalog of American Indian books and tape cassettes] . Minneapolis, MN : Mazena'igan Bookstore .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23361931. Title supplied by cataloger. "June 1990."

2015.   . (1979). R. B. McArthur, & C. Kelsey Reminiscences of Robert Beaulieu McArthur, White Earth band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23017541

2016.   McCafferty, K. A. (1993). Body to matrix: a study of vernacular sacred writings by women of four United States subcultures (women writers, sacred writings). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Arizona.
Abstract: Beginning Beginning with a redefinition of key critical terms and a discussion of the Western academy's stake in devaluing the discourse of the sacred, this dissertation moves into a study of the sacred writings of six American women. First, we look at Lucille Clifton's poetry in Good Woman and Next. We observe this poet's celebration of her participation in generative creation and racial continuity, through the body of motherhood. In addition, Clifton claims kinship with 'Other' cultural groups, based on shared values, understandings, and vocation. The second chapter explores the 'character' of the American tree in Toni Morrison's Beloved. The tree is a site where we can track the excruciating creation of African American double consciousness. Both African and Western paradigms of order are tested against the 'behavior' of the American tree and its displaced inscription on the body of a slave woman. A sapling New World model of the socio-sacred evolves from this experience, and takes root. In the third chapter, we look at the transmutation of Aztecan female deities and the values they embodied, into 'official' and non-official versions of the Virgin of Guadelupe. Ascribed and achieved connections with this image of the matrix are explored. In comparing literary representations by Sandra Cisneros and Gloria Anzaldua, we explore how sexual orientation factors into a woman's link with her generative matrix. The fourth chapter concerns the  development of the figure Pauline/Leopolda in Erdrich's Tracks and Love Medicine. We piece together her participation in a larger Chippewa drama (that of 'creative cosmic conflict'), and come to question whether official Western institutions have 'conquered' the Chippewa, or are themselves being amalgamated into a dynamic relationship much more ancient than white incursion. The final chapter is an examination of the slow conversion of an avant-garde, privileged 'white' woman Mabel Dodge Luhan, by the spirit of land-matrix she lives on. Written across a period of 20+ years of life in Taos, New Mexico, Dodge Luhan's work demonstrates that the Western subaltern must struggle against many layers of her own  ideological programming before meeting with the sacred, body to matrix, without philosophical or sacerdotal intermediaries. This suggests something Man-centered Subjectivity cannot tolerate: the possibility of an autonomous, sacred, forcefield with the ability to call humankind--in spite of material culture or ideological self-interest--to a creative, insurrectionist, alignment in the service of Life.

2017.   McCain, B. R. (1998). Grandmother's Dreamcatcher .  Albert Whitman & Company .
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2018.   McCartney, C. E., Steffens, K. M., & Imbra, C. M. (1992). Moral Development: Interview with Young Ojibwa Women. Initiatives, 55(1), 11.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2019.   . (1987). B. J. McCay, & J. M. Acheson (editors), The Question of the commons : the culture and ecology of communal resources  . Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 16465157
Abstract: Human ecology of the commons / Bonnie J. McCay, James M. Acheson -- The lobster fiefs revisited : economic and ecological effects of territoriality in Maine lobster fishing / James M. Acheson -- Common-property resource management and Cree indian fisheries in subarctic Canada / Fikret Berkes -- Game conservation or efficient hunting? / Raymond Hames -- Resource management in an Amazon varzea lake ecosystem : the Cocamilla case / Anthony Stocks -- Conservation and resource depletion : the case of the Boreal Forest Algonquians / Robert A. Brightman -- Marine tenure and conservation in Papua New Guinea : problems in interpretation / James G. Carrier -- Embedded systems and rooted models : the grazing lands of Botswana and the commons debate / Pauline E. Peters - - The culture of the commoners : historical observations on old and new world fisheries / Bonnie J. McCay -- The dynamics of communal and hereditary land tenure among the Tigray of Ethiopia / Dan Bauer -- The common swamplands of southeastern Borneo : multiple use, management, and conflict / Patricia J. Vondal. Institutional arrangements for resolving the commons dilemma : some contending approaches / Elinor Ostrom -- The call to the commons : decline and recommitment in Asturias, Spain / J. W. Fernandez -- "The river would run red with blood" : community and common property in an Irish fishing settlement / Lawrence Taylor -- An economic view of the tragedy of the commons / Ralph Townsend, James A. Wilson - - A Malaysian tragedy of the commons / E. N. Anderson, Jr. -- Intercepting the state : dramatic processes in the assertion of local comanagement rights / Evelyn Pinkerton -- The grass roots and the state : resource management in Icelandic fishing / E. Paul Durrenberger, Gisli Palsson.

2020.   McClurken, J. M. (1988). We wish to be civilized: Ottawa-American political contests on the Michigan frontier (volumes I and II) (Indians). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: Following the War of 1812, the Michigan Ottawa faced serious political and economic problems caused by the extension of United States jurisdiction into their homelands. A large influx of Americans disrupted the Ottawas' horticulture, fishing activities, and adaptation to the Euroamerican fur trade by challenging the Indians' political autonomy and usurping ever larger shares of the regions' natural resources. During the Jackson and Van Buren administrations, the Indian removal policy even threatened the Ottawa's right to remain in Michigan. The Ottawa, however, did not become passive victims.  When faced with dispossession, they adopted an internally generated program to conform to American definitions of 'civilized'  living. By so doing, they won the right to remain in their homeland and reached a culturally satisfying accommodation with the Americans. This ethnohistorical work examines the process of Ottawa adaptation from a world system perspective. Following the lead of Richard White, Carol Smith, James Scott, and Sherry Ortner it analyzes the Ottawa mode of production as a key mechanism by which the Indians created a place for themselves in Michigan frontier society. It contributes to ongoing theoretical discussions by identifying the local factors that limited the success of United States attempts to dominate the Ottawa. Further, it works from an actor-oriented perspective to see the influence of individuals in shaping nineteenth century Michigan society. Between 1820 and 1855, Ottawa leaders became involved in a series of political contests in which they maintained access to a significant portion of their traditional lands and their natural resources. They convinced their constituents to adopt key elements of American culture,  including new male and female roles in the division of labor,  landownership, Christian rites, and a new range of material goods.  By defining change as including a continuation of historic patterns of production and exchange they successfully accommodated their cultural emphasis on provisioning the Euroamerican economy to the American market. They became successful friends, neighbors, and relatives of prominent Americans whose interests entwined those of with the Indians and helped defeat efforts to implement the removal policy.

2021.   . (1863). H. E. B. McConkey, 1818-1883Dakota war whoop: or, Indian massacres and war in Minnesota of 1862-3 Rev. ed. ed., ). Minneapolis : Ross & Harper.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7508626 ... accession: 5763205. Reprint of the 1864 ed. Includes index. ... accession: 4629403: St. Paul : Published for the author, Wm. J. Moses' Pr.) 1864

2022.   McCormick, T. L. (some descendants of William I of England.  genealogical papers of Goldie Moffatt Satterlee.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2023.   McCurdy, D. G. (1993). Beyond boundaries: Aboriginal peoples and the prairie west. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Victoria (Canada).
Abstract: Historians in the field of Native-white relations often write of 'Canadian' and 'American' Indians on the assumption that European boundaries and European nationalities have been inherently meaningful to aboriginal peoples. Yet Native peoples often had significant ties with populations on the other side of the Canada-United States border. Peoples like the 'Canadian' Blackfoot, for example, had more in common with 'American' Blackfoot than with the culturally and geographically distant 'Canadian' Cree. This fact calls into question the conceptualizations historians have made about aboriginal peoples. In this study, an attempt has been made to reposition the historical lens away from the modern nation state and towards aboriginal peoples. It examines the Cree, Ojibwa, Blackfoot and Dakota peoples of the Northern Great Plains and the impact that the boundary between Canada and the United States has had on their lives. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

2024.   McDonald, N. E. (1996). A study of the changes in Ojibwa, Tlinget, and Hopi basketry as relating to economic, political, societal and historical changes in the respective societies. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: A field study was conducted of basket collections at the Field Museum of Natural History, the Heard Museum, the Jesse Besser Museum, and the Arizona State Museum to ascertain whether the basketry of the Ojibwa, Tlinget, and Hopi changed over the years. If it did, how was that related to political, historical, economic, and societal changes through the years? The pertinent literature in history, anthropology, and art showed that no studies had been conducted in this area. Most of the basket literature is of a escriptive and methodological nature. An interdisciplinary approach has not been taken in relation to the basketry of the three societies. The study showed that there is a correlation between the changes in the societies and the changes in the baskets over the years. Further studies of an interdisciplinary nature with more museum basket collections are recommended.

2025.   . (1874). R. McDonald, Rev.The Books of the twelve Minor Prophets. O muzinaiiguniwan igiw mitaswi ashi nizh anwajigewininwug noondash opitendagozijig . Cambridge [Eng.] : Printed at the University Press, for the British and Foreign Bible Society, London.
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 06019357

2026.   McDowell, H. M. (1971). Appraisal of the lands of the Red Lake band of Chippewa Indians in Minnesota, on various dates . Boise, Idaho : Idaho Land & Appraisal Service.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  "Docket no. 189." Bibliography: leaves [1]-[4] (last grouping).  United States. Indian Claims Commission. Idaho Land & Appraisal Service.

2027.   McKaye, K. R. (1980). Seasonality in Habitat Selection by the Gold Color Morph of Cichlasoma Citrinellum and Its Relevance to Sympatric Speciation in the Family Cichlidae. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 5(1), 75-78.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: C. citrinellum is a polymorphic species whose individual coloration varies from the dark grey markings typical of the species to yellow, orange and red. In Lake Jiloa, Nicaragua the depth distribution of these latter, nongrey, golden morphs shows dramatic seasonal variation. In the height of the dry season in Feb. over 50% of the gold morphs occur above 9 m, but as the breeding season approaches they migrate deeper such that less than 7% of the gold population occurs above 9 m at the onset of the breeding season. During the rainy season when breeding occurs most of the gold morphs occur below 15 m. Gold morphs voluntarily move into deeper water to breed rather than being aggressively forced deeper by larger, territorial grey morphs as was previously implied. Since the morphs of this species assortatively mate and select different habitats in which to breed, future sympatric splitting of this species is possible. Likely examples of sympatric speciation and of incipient speciation in the family Cichlidae are discussed.

2028.   McKee, D. (1998). Self-unfolding: the parts, processes, principles and patterns of development as understood in eastern meditative, Native North American, and western scientific traditions. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Union Institute.
Abstract: This work explores the ways in which three traditions for understanding the human person--the Eastern Meditative  (exemplified by yoga and t'ai chi), the Native North American  (exemplified by traditional Ojibwe life), and the Western Scientific  (exemplified by developmental psychology theory and research)--contribute to our understanding of the development of the self. These three traditions are integrated by a developmental paradigm which maps the 'pattern of patterns' that obtains across the traditions. The grounding premise of this paradigm is that we unfold through a movement from (1) Becoming One in the integration of the parts within ourselves which form the Body (the bodily self), to (2) Belonging as Two with the harmonizing of the processes between self and other which form the Heart (the emotional self), to (3) Believing as Three by the synchronized representation of the principles among ourselves and many others which form the Mind (the mental self), and culminating in (4) Being as Three-in-One through the transforming and stilling of Body, Heart, and Mind to form the patterned whole of the soulful life which flows within, between, among, and through us. Each of the three traditions is shown to emphasize an aspect of this developmental paradigm. The Eastern Meditative Tradition accents the integration of the Body's becoming, employing systematic practices to take within external forceful energies and transform them into regulated internal flows. The Native North American Tradition accents the harmonization of the Heart's belonging, focusing on the cultivation of relationships of mutual gifting involving nurturing, caring, partnering, and sharing. The Western Scientific Tradition accents the representing of the Mind's believing, elaborating complex symbolic systems for externally voicing our understanding of our experience. We examine the strengths and weaknesses of how each tradition contributes to the truer formation of our living in the Western techno-industrial context.

2029.   McKenney, T. L. (1959). Sketches of a Tour to the Lakes.  Ross & Haines Old Books Company.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2030.   McKenzie, J. (1986). Lipsha's good road home: the revival of Chippewa culture in Love Medicine. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 10(3), 53-53.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2031.   McKinney, K. J. (1999). False Miracles and Failed Vision in Louise Erdrich's Love Medicine. Studies in Contemporary Fiction, 40(2), 152 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [full text available]
Abstract: Louise Erdrich is a novelist who writes from her perspective as a Chippewa and German. Erdrich tells stories of an extended North Dakota family, both German and Native American, in all four of her novels. The works are a microcosm of the cultural schizophrenia that infects American life at various levels.

2032.   McKnight, C. Our Western Border, Its Life, Combats, Adventures, Forays, Massacres, Captivities, Scouts, Red Chiefs, Pioneers, Women, One Hundred Years Ago, Carefully Written & Compiled .  Johnson Reprint Corporation.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2033.   McLeod, F. D. (1987). American Indian perception of counselor characteristics in a counseling interview (Michigan). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Western Michigan University.
Abstract: This investigation of Native Americans determined to what extent counselor expertness, effectiveness and trustworthiness affect their perception of the counseling interview. The study was specifically designed to assess Native American attitudes as they relate to situational counselor characteristics and behavior. The attitudinal preferences investigated were: (a) racial characteristics of counselor,  (b) personal attractiveness of counselor, (c) expertness of counselor, and (d) trustworthiness of counselor. The sample for the study was composed of 60 Native American students randomly selected through Project M.A.I.S.S. (Making American Indians Self-Sufficient), an academic remedial program for American Indian students from the area around Kalamazoo, Michigan. The students ranged in ages from 15 to 18 and were between the grades 9 and 12. Instruments used to assess the differential effects of each of the independent variables included two instruments, (1) the Counselor Rating Form (CRF), designed to measure attitudinal preferences for specific counselor characteristics, and (2) the Counselor Effectiveness Rating Scale (CERS), designed to evaluate specific attitudes as responses to counselor behavior. Earlier research indicated interaction effects among non-Indian samples; therefore,  the present study utilized both Indian and non-Indian role persons in the interview situation. Relationships between variables were described using mean scores and standard deviations, and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance, as well as multiple step-wise correlations to explore the relationships between variables. Analysis of the results indicated that Native American students rated the simulated interviews more positively when the counselors enacted trustworthiness. It was evident too, that counselor ethnicity (Indian, non-Indian) was not significant when the non-Indian counselor was trained in, or was knowledgeable in culturally appropriate behaviors and appropriate communication methods. Inspection of the results emanating from the investigation led to a conclusion that certain counselor attitudes and behaviors are important to counseling interviews with Native Americans. Another important conclusion was also reached indicating that trustworthiness, expertness, and attractiveness are relevant counselor characteristics for Native American clients, regardless of counselor ethnicity. Further studies,  however, are required before generalizations can be made to include numerous other Native American cultures.

2034.   McMahon, A. M. S., & McMahon, R. (1995). Linguistics, Genetics and Archaeology, Internal and External Evidence in the Amerind Controversy. Transactions of the Philological Society, 93(2), 125-225.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2035.   McMullen, S. L. (1998). Disunity and dispossession: Nawash Ojibwa and Potawatomi in the Saugeen Territory, 1836-1865 (Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Calgary (Canada).
Abstract: This study explores the dual themes of factionalism and dispossession among the Ojibwa and Potawatomi in the Saugeen Territory between 1836 and 1865. Chapter I lays the foundation of the study by briefly examining the evolution of Native-non-Native relations in southern Ontario to 1836. Chapter II focuses on the development of Ojibwa-Potawatomi factionalism in the Saugeen Territory, between 1836 and 1850. The third chapter presents the results of this division by examining the three Saugeen treaties of the 1850s. The final chapter discusses the removal of the Nawash band to Cape Croker, and the endurance of factionalism at the new reserve. This thesis offers the proposition that the differences between the Ojibwa hosts and the Potawatomi immigrants from the United States created divisions at the Newash village. The Indian Department then exploited this discord to secure the treaties required by a growing settler population.

2036.   McNally, M. D. (1996). Ojibwa singers: evangelican hymns and a native culture in motion (Native Americans, ritual). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Harvard University.
Abstract: Beginning in the 1830s, Protestant missionaries to the Ojibwa, or anishinaabe, people promoted translations of evangelical hymns into the native language, regarding this music as a shared form of worship but also as a sharp tool for rooting out the 'indianness' of native people. For many Ojibwa people today, however, these hymns have emerged from a history of material and cultural dispossession to become emblematic of their identity as anishinaabe. Chanted by certain elders according to distinctive rules of performance, the songs are prominent features of funeral wakes and other charged moments in the life of the community and provide a rich resource of language and cultural memory that helps make survival as Ojibwa people in the modern world possible. This thesis uses hymn singing as a sharply-focused lens to view the broader cultural processes by which Native American people have creatively drawn on the resources of ritual to negotiate identity, survival, and vision within the structures of colonialism. Based on archival and ethnographic research, my study traces the historical development of ritualized singing and how this distinctive practice has been put to different uses at different moments in Ojibwa history. In the 1870s, the practice of hymn singing set the tone for a new way of life within the confines of reservation while giving voice to the more fundamental of anishinaabe values. A century later, after the tradition had all but died out, a group of White Earth reservation elders rekindled hymn singing at wakes to help a factionalized community remember itself in precisely those moments when untimely, often violent, deaths threaten community survival. Following Pierre Bourdieu, Michel de Certeau, and Catherine Bell, a theoretical orientation to the logic of practice recasts the seeming irony of this story in light of the capacity of music and non-narrative symbolic action to hold contradictions in tension and to integrate communities across boundaries of convention. Of course, that which crosses boundaries also serves to articulate them. The thesis also examines the contested nature of 'the traditional' and places the elders' hymn singing in terms of their cultural criticism.

2037.   McNamara, L. (1993). Aboriginal peoples, the administration of justice and the autonomy agenda: an assessment of the status of criminal justice reform in Canada with reference to the prairie region. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Manitoba (Canada).
Abstract: For more than 20 years the Canadian criminal justice system has been the subject of reforms designed to address overwhelming evidence of the system's disproportionate and discriminatory impact on Aboriginal peoples. For the most part, this approach has been unsuccessful, primarily because of a failure to recognize the critical nexus between justice reform and the demand of the First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples of Canada for constitutional recognition of their right to govern in their own communities. An examination of several recent reports of Aboriginal justice inquiries suggests that this connection is finally being made, with the consequence that community-based autonomy has emerged as the underlying principle of justice reform initiatives. Recommendations for the establishment of comprehensive Aboriginal justice systems as a component of the inherent right of Aboriginal self-government are illustrative of a dramatic and encouraging re-direction of the reform agenda. However, before this major restructuring of the Canadian justice landscape can be effected, several key issues including the role of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the jurisdictional framework for Aboriginal justice autonomy, must be resolved.

2038.   McNatt, R. (1995). A Face in the Rock - the Tale of a Grand-Island Chippewa - Graham, L. R. New York Times Book Review, (24).
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2039.   McNeil, E. (1995). "The game never ends": Gerald Vizenor's gamble with language and structure in "Summer in the Spring". American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 19(2), 85-109.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: A series of tales in 'The Progress', the first newspaper published on an Indian reservation in Minnesota, was edited by Theodore Hudon Beaulieu. Gerald Vizenor wrote trickster myths in 'Summer in the Spring: Anishinaabe Lyric Poems and Stories', and these are taken, almost totally, from the tales in 'The Progress.' To a serious reader, this work offers an insight into the native literature and their culture.

2040.   McRae, N. (1982). Blacks in Detroit, 1736-1833: the search for freedom and community and its implications for educators. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Michigan.
Abstract: This historical study describes the French Canadian, English and American backgrounds of early blacks whose progeny migrated into Detroit. It also illustrates the typical and unique experiences of blacks as they sought freedom and economic opportunity on this northern frontier. Under the French, most slaves were Indians called Panis. There were, however, a small number of black slaves. They were Catholic, spoke French, and had French names. When Detroit became a British colony, the number of blacks increased. New York merchants in the Indian and fur trade initiated new measures to lessen their business expenses. They used slaves to haul cargo and make portages. These slaves came from the eastern colonies and the Mississippi Valley and were valuable liquid assetseasily transportable and salable. Selected correspondence from these merchants provide a unique view of the slave trade in Detroit after 1760. During the Revolutionary War, blacks were brought to Detroit as the results of the fortunes of war. The LaForce Affair and DuSable's capture were illustrative examples. The Northwest Ordinance did not abolish slavery in Detroit. A number of court cases such as Denison versus Tucker in 1807, helped to define the parameters of slavery in Michigan Territory. The fight for individual freedom and the relatively small number of black people in Detroit precluded the establishment of black churches, schools, or self-help organizations present in cities such as Boston, New York City, and Philadelphia. Nevertheless, it was the plight of Rutha and Thornton Blackburn, fugitive slaves in the city jail, that caused blacks in Detroit to come together in order to organize their escape. This call to action led to the race riot of 1833. In 1833, blacks in Detroit displayed many of the skills necessary for community building, but a riot does not a community make. It was not until 1836, when thirteen black men and women resigned from First Baptist Church to form the Society of Second Baptist Church, that the foundation for Detroit's black community was laid.

2041.   McShane, D., & Blue, A. W. (1985). Ojibwa world view: a re-examination. Canadian Journal of Native Studies, 5(1), 115-134.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2042.   McSorley, J. J. (1996). Alberta's metis and educational reform: the politics of empowering minority students through mainstream education. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Carleton University (Canada).
Abstract: In this study, the author examines the political process that occurs when minority communities attempt to gain access into the governance structures of mainstream education. Focussing on the efforts of the Metis Nations of Alberta, this study examines the educational needs minority communities have and the strategies that are employed to make mainstream education a tool of empowerment for minority communities. As well, this study examines the policy positions the government of Alberta holds on minority education. The conclusions of the study suggest that, while the Alberta Metis have made meaningful progress in their attempts to gain better access into the structures of educational governance, new windows into government must be created if the Metis hope to reach their ultimate educational objectives.

2043.   McTaggart, F. (1994). Wolf That I Am: In Search of the Red Earth People.  University of Oklahoma Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2044.   Mcwhorter, J. H., & Ward, S. D. (1998). American Indian Dreams. Our Complements. North Carolina Medical Journal, 59(4), 261.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2045.   Meacham, A. B. (Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon). (1872). Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior for the year 1871  (p. 306).  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2046.   Mead, M. (1968). And keep your powder dry, an expanded edition of a classic work on the American character.  William Morrow Co.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2047.   Meade, D. C. (1994). Heart Bags & Hand Shakes: The Story of the Cook Collection.  National Woodlands Publishing Company.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2048.   Meade, M. J. (1994). The Ojibwe. Piecework, 2(6), 77.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)
Abstract: A brief introduction to the woodland tribe.

2049.   Meadows, C. A., & Snudden, B. H. (1982). Prevalence of Yersinia Enterocolitica in Waters of the Lower Chippewa River Basin, Wisconsin. Applied & Environmental Microbiology, 43(4), 953-954.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Water samples collected over a 14-month period from the lower Chippewa River drainage basin in Wisconsin were examined for Yersinia enterocolitica with either MacConkey-Tween 80 agar or Y-M agar (T. N. Saari and G. P. Jansen, Contrib. Microbiol. Immunol. 5:185-196) as the selective medium. A new method of isolation was developed. Of 303 water samples, 8.25% were positive. A seasonal variation was noticed, with winter isolations being most frequent.

2050.   . (1996). [medical research--clinical trials].: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register .
Notes: Source: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

2051.   . (1998). [medical research--clinical trials].: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register .
Notes: Source: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

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Notes: Source: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

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Notes: Source: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

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Notes: Source: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL/CCTR) [electronic database], Fall 1999 search

2072.   Mee Jr., C. L. (1990). How a mysterious disease laid low Europe's masses. Smithsonian, 20(11), 71-72.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2073.   Meekel, H. S. (Field representative).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995), worked for the B.I.A. at Red Lake

2074.   Meijer Drees, L. (1998). A history of the Indian Association of alberta, 1939-1959 (First Nations). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Calgary (Canada).
Abstract: The Indian Association of Alberta was officially formed in 1939 by a group of central Alberta Indian and Metis leaders who sought to protect and advance the Treaty rights of Alberta's Indian peoples. In two decades, the organization saw the rise and retirement of an important generation of leaders, it made significant inroads into the Canadian political system, and it contributed to the revision of the Indian Act in 1951. By 1959 Ottawa recognized and frequently consulted with the IAA for its views on various issues affecting Indian peoples. Interestingly, in the 1940s and 1950s the emphasis of IAA agenda gradually moved away from Treaty rights in favour of seeking social and economic reform for Indian communities in this early period. To date, historians have suggested that Indian political activity in the prairie region was minimal, and a product of Native involvement in the Second World War. This research suggests local, everyday factors pre-dating the War as the primary factors encouraging Indian peoples to create a formal union promoting their cause. Concern over reserve size, hunting and fishing rights, improving education and health in reserve communities were the priorities of Indian leaders in this period. In contrast to the Saskatchewan and British Columbia Indian political groups whose focus remained on land and Treaty rights, the IAA gradually came to favour gaining greater social and economic equality for Indian citizens by working through government. The IAA's activity is linked here to the Metis Association of Alberta, Alberta farm unions, and other non-Native service organizations. The role of 'outside help' in the IAA was prominent and important throughout the first decades of its operations. Calgary school teacher John Laurie and the Edmonton-based Friends of the Indian society were perhaps the most prominent 'outside' influence on the union.

2075.   . (1965). Menominee IndiansTreaties between the Menominee Indians and the United States of America, 1817-1856 . Oshkosh, Wisc.  Museum of Anthropology, Wisconsin State University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

2076.   Menta, J. P. (1996). Cultural conflict in southern New England: a history of the Quinnipiac Indians (Connecticut). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Southern Connecticut State University.
Abstract: The Quinnipiacs, the indigenous Algonquians who lived in south central Connecticut, had developed a culture that allowed them to prosper by the time the first Europeans visited their shores. By 1638 the first permanent English settlement, New Haven, existed within their territory. During those first years after contact, the Quinnipiacs, because of their familiarity with the local environment, proved useful to the newcomers; but following this brief period of accommodation, cultural tensions developed between the two groups. Although land disputes were the most frequent source of problems, no aspect of life was too insignificant to lead to problems. The tensions grew steadily more exacerbated until the surviving Quinnipiacs, in about 1750, began to leave their former domain. Their diaspora was a complicated and unhappy tale. Yet even at the end of the 20th century, descendants of the tribe endured among the Native American people of Wisconsin.

2077.   Mercredi, M. (1996). A Journey to Native Canada.  The Lerner Publishing Group.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2078.   Meredith, H. V. (1983). Compilation and Comparison of Averages for Standing Height at Late Childhood Ages on Usa Boys of Several Ethnic Groups Studied Between 1875 and 1980. American Journal of Physical Anthropology , 61(1), 111-124.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Averages for standing height are brought together at late childhood ages on boys of different ethnic groups studied in the USA during the last 100 yr. More than 80 averages are assembled at each of 2 ages (9 yr and 11 yr). Among the groups represented are boys having the following ancestries: Afro-Black, Amerind, Chinese, Japanese, Eskimo, Mexican, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Finnish, German, Italian, British, and Dutch. Suffice to cite examples of findings on boys age 11 yr. USA Black boys studied during the period 1967-1978 were taller than those studied during 1886-1898 by 11.4 cm, or 8.6%. Average standing heights in the 1930 were near 134 cm for Pueblo boys; near 139 cm for boys whose progenitors were Navajo, Mexican or Polish; and near 142 cm for boys of Finnish ancestry. In the 1950s, average standing heights were near 140 cm, 144 cm and 146 cm, respectively, on USA boys of Japanese, Italian and Dutch ancestries. Afro-Black and Amerind similarities and dissimilarities in the 1960s are illustrated by averages near 140 cm on Black and Chippewa groups in Pennsylvania and Minnesota, and near 144 cm on Black and Blackfeet groups in Ohio and Montana. In some instances, averages are compared for upper and lower socioeconomic subgroups, and for urban and rural subgroups.

2079.   Meriam, L. The Problem of Indian Administration, submitted to Secretary of the Interior Hubert Work, February 21, 1928.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2080.   Merritt, J. (1997). Annie Humphrey -- Ojibwe Singer for Beauty. Winds of Change : a Magazine for American Indians, 12(4), 142.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

2081.   Merritt, J. (1995). Bridge-Builders and Storytellers. Winds of Change : a Magazine for American Indian ...  10(4), 106.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)
Abstract: Anne M. Dunn, Ojibwe storyteller, shares in the revival of teaching and learning stories

2082.   Merriwether, D. A., Rothhammer, F., & Ferrell, R. E. (1995). Distribution of the Four Founding Lineage Haplotypes in Native Americans Suggests a Single Wave of Migration for the New World. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 98(4), 411-430.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The distribution of the four founding lineage haplogroups in Native Americans from North, Central, and South America shows a north to south increase in the frequency of lineage B and a North to South decrease in the frequency of lineage A. All four founding lineage haplogroups were detected in North, Central, and South America, and in Greenberg et al.'s ([1986] Curr. Anthropol. 27:477-497) three major linguistic groups (Amerind, NaDene, and Eskaleut), with all four haplogroups often found within a single population. Lineage A was the most common lineage in North America, regardless of language group. This overall distribution is most parsimonious with a single wave of migration into the New World which included multiple variants of all four founding lineage types. Torroni et al.'s ([1993a] Am. J. Hum. Genet. 53:563-590) report that lineage B has a more recent divergence time than the other three lineages can best be explained by multiple variants of lineages A, C, and D, and fewer variants of lineage B entering the New World. Alternatively, there could have been multiple waves of migration from a single parent population in Asia/Siberia which repeatedly reintroduced the same lineages to the New World. (C) 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [References: 64]

2083.   Messer, R. (1989). Structuralist's view of an Indian creation myth. Anthropologica [Waterloo], 31(2), 195-235.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2084.   Messer, R. P. (1981). A Jungian analysis of the archetypal significance of Nanabozho, the trickster-transformer--culture hero of Chippewa mythology. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Carleton University (Canada).

2085.   Lake Champlain : exhibiting at one view, the claims of the French express'd by dotted black lines, and the grants made to the English reduced officers, and disbanded soldiers in obedience to His Majesty's proclamation of the 7th of October 1763, distinguished by red lines
 MAP DATA: Scale [1:253,440]. Four miles in one inch.
(1763). 
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 10796439.  Other: Vermont Heritage Press. A Plan of Lake Champlain.
Abstract: Includes table: Explanation of the French claims. "A Plan of" added in ms. at head of title. "The 15th degree of latitude settld by Sr. Henry Moore Bart. Govr. of New-York, and Brigadier Genl. Carlton Lieut. Genr. of Canada, as the boundary of the two provinces."

2086.   Metz, S. (1990). A Legacy of Broken Promises. Sojourners, 19(5), 16.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: American Indian treaty rights attacked in Wisconsin.

2087.   Mewasinota Heritage Group. (1980). Footsteps in time : Meota, Prince, Wing, Russell, Fitzgerald, Vyner, St. Michael, Jackfish Creek, Ness, Lavigne, Cochin, Murray Lake, Scentgrass, Glenrose, Moosomin, Saulteaux, Metinota . Meota, Sask.  Meota History Book Committee.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

2088.   Meyer, C. M. (1970). Minnesota Indian resources directory . [Minneapolis] : Training Center for Community Programs in coordination with the Office of Community Programs, Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8019500. "May 1970." "This is a section of the final report of the National Study of American Indian Education ... " Bibliography: p. [1]-3 (3rd group)

2089.   Meyer, M. L. (1990). Signatures and Thumbprints: Ethnicity among the White Earth Anishinaabeg,1889-1920. Social Science History, 14(3), 305.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

2090.   Meyer, M. L. (1991). "We Can Not Get a Living as We Used To.". The American Historical Review, 96(2), 368.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)
Abstract: Dispossession and the White Earth Anishinaabeg, 1889-1920.

2091.   Meyer, M. L. "We can not get a living as we used to": dispossession and the White Earth Anishnaabeg, 1889-1920.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995).  The title used in citation was taken from a photostatic copy of a draft of her PhD dissertation which Melissa Meyer circulated in the White Earth community; Ahnishinahbæótjibway archives copy a gift from community member at White Earth.

2092.   Meyer, M. L. M. L. (1994). The White Earth tragedy: ethnicity and dispossession at a Minnesota Anishinaabe Reservation, 1889-1920. Lincon: University of Nebraska Press.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 297- 313) and index.
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [review]

2093.   Meyer, M. L. (1986). Tradition and the market: the social relations of the White Earth Anishinaabeg, 1889-1920 (Chippewa, Ojibwe, Reservation, Minnesota, American Indian). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: Established in 1867 as a grand experiment to consolidate all of the bands of Minnesota Anishinaabeg on one reservation, White Earth represented the best scheme that social engineers then had to offer for assimilating the Anishinaabeg. They situated White Earth straddling Minnesota's parkland belt so that the Indians who moved there would have access to diverse resources. Immigrant Anishinaabe bands tended to maintain band ties, social roles, and traditional leadership roles after removal to White Earth. Chain migrations characterized the removal and previous band affiliations were often maintained through settlement patterns. Passage of the 1889 Nelson Act heralded the beginning of the headlong exploitation of Anishinaabe resources rather than the social experiment in assimilation envisioned by U.S. policymakers. However, allotment itself did not cause the dispossession of the White Earth Anishinaabeg. The premature removal of protective restrictions on the lands of mixed bloods on the White Earth Reservation in 1906 unleashed a torrent of fraudulent land transactions, some of which are still pending in the courts today. Factions emerged on the Reservation as residents came to disagree on their vision of the future. Struggles over the management of resources reflected the dynamics of political affiliations stemming from competition between two ethnic groups on the Reservation, 'traditional' Anishinaabeg from interior Minnesota bands and capitalistically-oriented innovators with ethnic roots in Great Lakes fur trade/metis society. Access to their traditional seasonal round enabled the Anishinaabeg at White Earth to retain a greater degree of autonomy for a longer period of time than their counterparts on the Great Plains. Once their lands were alienated, however, the Anishinaabeg suffered much the same fate as other dispossessed Indian groups. Although some continued to adhere to their seasonal gathering activities, they could meet only part of their subsistence needs. Some White Earth Anishinaabeg came to rely more on seasonal wage labor in agriculture in the Red River valley and in lumbering. For others, dependence on tribal gratuities and the U.S. government resulted. As the population of the Reservation increased, and as available resources and economic opportunities constricted, residents of White Earth increasingly opted to leave the Reservation to make their ways in nearby towns and cities.

2094.   (199u). [Audiovisual]. J. A. Meyers (National Indian Justice Center. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Branch of Judicial Review). Petaluma, Calif.  National Indian Justice Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 37812905. Tape accompanies workbook "Tribal courts and non-Indians : civil jurisdiction.  Alt Title: Tribal courts and non-Indians : civil jurisdiction.

2095.   Michelson, T. (1927). Contributions to Fox ethnology. Washington, D.C.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2096.   Michelson, T. (1995). Contributions to Fox Ethnology - II.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2097.   Michelson, T. (1995). Fox Miscellany.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2098.   Michelson, T. (1995). Notes on the Buffalo-Head Dance of the Thunder Gens of the Fox Indians.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2099.   Michelson, T. (1995). Notes on the Fox Wapanowiweni.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2100.   Michelson, T. (1995). Observations on the Thunder Dance of the Bear Gens of the Fox Indians.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2101.   Michelson, T. Ojibwa Texts.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2102.   Michelson, T. (1995). Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians.  Reprint Services Corporation.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2103.   Michelson, T. (1926). Studies of the Fox and Ojibwa Indians. Smithsonian Institution. Explorations and Field-Work ... in 1925,  111-113, illus. 112-113.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search, "Cover title"

2104.   Michlovic, M. G. (1990). Early Indian Life on the Plains. The Minnesota Volunteer, 53(311), 43.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2105.   Michon, J. L. (1972). La grande médecine des Ojibways. Bulletin De La Société Suisse Des Américanistes, 36, 37-72.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVIII (1974:156)

2106.   Mighty Mohawks (Composer). (196u). The Mighty Mohawks capture  countryToronto: Arc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: Program notes on container. Country songs; sung & played by the Mighty Mohawks. Caughnawaga -- Rose of Old Pawnee -- Steel rail blues -- Half  and half -- Kaw-liga -- All alone -- Joli Jacqueline -- The  fugitive -- Mule skinner -- Distant drums -- The French song - - Richabucto shore.

2107.   Miles, R. (1989). Mille Lacs Kathio: A Window in Time. The Minnesota Volunteer, 52(306), 8.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2108.   Miller, B. B., Tevesz, M. J. S., & Smith, J. E. (1997). Post-Chippewa oxygen isotope record from Cowles Bog, southern Lake Michigan basin. J PALEOLIMNOL , 18(3), 299-305.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

2109.   Miller, E. S. (1979). Introduction ot Cultural Anthropology.  Prentice-Hall.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[pages 254-255]

2110.   Miller, F. C.Problems of succession in a Chippewa tribal council. in M. J. Swartz, W. Turner, & A. Tuden (editors), Political Anthropology  (pp. 173-185). Chicago, IL: Aldine.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIV (1970:99)

2111.   Miller, F. C., & Caulkins, D. D. (1964). Chippewa adolescents: a changing generation. Human Organization, 23(2), 150-159.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. X (1966:157)

2112.   Miller, H. (1967). Education for the disadvantaged.  The Free Press, Macmillan Co.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:103), "Bibliography"

2113.   Miller, H. M. (1976). A study of personal economic concepts and personal finance attitudes of Wisconsin Winnebago Indian youth compared with White youth in selected Wisconsin public school. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Northern Illinois University.

2114.   Miller, J. (1982). People, Berdaches and Left-Handed Bears: Human Variation in Native America. Journal of Anthropological Research, 38(3), 274-287.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The native cultures of North America recognize a bewilderingly large range of humanoid beings, only some of whom are human. Focusing on 4 widely scattered tribes (Nootka, Keres, Kootenay, Winnebago) with examples from several other (Blackfeet, Pomo, Ojibwa, Tsimshian, Lenape Delaware), the mediating role played by berdaches, bears and others in these cultures is examined. Consideration is also given to variations in the psychological, categorical and symbolic aspects of gender and of the culture/nature continuum.

2115.   Miller, L. M., & Kapuscinski, A. R. (1994). Estimation of selection differentials from fish scales: A step towards evaluating genetic alteration of fish size in exploited populations. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (Ottawa);  51(4), 774-783.
Notes: Source: Fish & Fisheries Worldwide databases: FishLit [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 29, 1999 search

2116.   Miller, M. J., Scott, F., & Foster, E. F. (1972). Community Control of Amebic Disease by Periodic Mass Treatment With Metronidazole. American Journal of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene, 21 , 400-403.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Results of a 12-month drug treatment program in 350 people, using metronidazole for prophylactic control of amebic disease on an American Indian reservation in northern Canada are reported.

2117.   . (1981). M. MillerAmerican Indian alcoholism in St. Paul : a needs assessment  . Minneapolis, Minn.  Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, University of Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8134666. Bibliography: p. 39-60.  Other: Wittstock, Laura Waterman. Community Planning Organization (Saint Paul, Minn.) Juel Fairbanks Aftercare Residence. University of Minnesota. Center for Urban and Regional Affairs.

2118.   Miller, O. A. E. (1866). Luther Lee : an episode of the Indian massacre, in Minnesota, in 1862 . Minneapolis : Atlas printing co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21550387

2119.   Mills, A. C. (1981). The Beaver Indian Prophet dance and related  movements among North American Indians . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Harvard University, Microfiche. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms  International, 1982. 3 microfiche.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

2120.   Mills, M. C. (1997). A comparative socio-economic analysis of the Metis settlements of Alberta. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada).
Abstract: This thesis is a comparative socio-economic analysis of selected demographic characteristics of the Metis Settlements of Alberta. Differences in population distribution, education, labour force and income are examined to compare the socio-economic conditions of the Settlements with their provincial and national counterparts. A central conclusion of this work is that persons living on the Metis Settlements in Alberta have a significantly lower standard of living than persons who reside in other parts of Alberta and Canada. To unify the main ideas of this analysis, a theoretical synthesis is presented for scholars interested in pursuing this topic in subsequent research.

2121.   Mills, W. G. (Wilfrid Gordon), 1886-1960. (1992). Legends of the Mississaugas . Pickering, Ont.: Altona Editions.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Poem. Includes bibliographical references: p. 48.  OTHER: Mamakeesick, Saul, 1957-

2122.   Milner, C. M. (1999). Ceramic style, social differentiation, and resource uncertainty in the late prehistoric upper Great Lakes (Michigan, Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, the University of Michigan.
Abstract: In small-scale societies, inter-group identification expedites access to alternative resources and places, while boundaries facilitate exchange among socially distant people to offset widespread, severe resource shortfalls. These risk-buffering strategies become critical when subsistence intensification and other strategies are not viable. Nested social networks that progressively encompass larger populations and places compensate for shortfalls occurring on different temporal and spatial scales. The inclusion of ecologically diverse areas provides access to areas subject to different sources of risk. Identification and differentiation that facilitate resource sharing should be expressed in and manipulated through material culture. Inter-group identification and differentiation were critical risk-buffering strategies in the Upper Great Lakes during the Juntunen phase, A.D. 1200 to 1650. Paleo-environmental and archaeological data are used to reconstruct the contexts to which Juntunen phase people adapted. Early historic data on the Ottawa and Ojibwa who inhabited the region at contact provide evidence for local, subregion and regional networks, and alliances with inter-regional populations. The latter became critical after A.D. 1400 with the increased frequency and severity of resource failures of the Little Ice Age. Expectations of ceramic style variability that track identification and differentiation are derived from a hierarchical model of style and considerations of visibility to target populations. Variation among 1097 vessels from 66 Juntunen phase sites are studied. Analysis of well-dated components permit the division of the phase into two 200-year subphases and the isolation of chronologically-sensitive variables used to date other components. Spatial analysis isolates pan-regional stylistic homogeneity at every level of the design hierarchy; clinal variation in a few low-level attributes; a west versus east stylistic division of the region; subregion stylistic markers, many of which derive from inter-regional interaction; and increased intra-regional diversity over time. Stylistic homogeneity and clinal patterning indicates the existence of a stable configuration of groups sharing a common identity. Subregion networks distinguished themselves from each other and constructed alliances across regional borders. Increased intra-regional differentiation indicates that these alliances became more important around A.D. 1400. Social identification and differentiation indicated by these patterns are best understood as responses to the environmental risk faced by Juntunen phase populations.

2123.   Milwaukee Public Library. Native American Library Project. (1980). Native American community resource handbook, 1980 . Milwaukee: Native American Library Project.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

2124.   Minneapolis Housing and Redevelopment Authority. (1979). An application of the utilization of urban Indian housing program funds . Minneapolis, Minn.  Minneapolis Housing and Redevelopment Authority.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14585053

2125.   Minneapolis Industrial Exposition (7th : 1892). (1892). Catalogue of works of art : in the art galleries of the Minneapois Industrial Exposition, seventh annual exhibit : consisting of paintings from the leading American and European artists, water colors, pastels, etchings, relics from Alaska, cliff dwellers and Indian curios . Minneapolis : Swinburne Print. Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 17942386. Title on cover: Art catalogue '92, Minneapolis Industrial Exposition. Other: Smith, H. Jay. Art catalogue '92, Minneapolis Industrial Exposition

2126.   Minneapolis Public Schools. Dept. of Indian Education. (1978). Let us put our minds together and see what life we will make for our children : a report . Minneapolis, Minn.  Minneapolis Public Schools. Dept. of Indian Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14581625. Title from cover.

2127.   (1971). [Audiovisual]. Minneapolis Public Schools. Special School District No. 1. Minneapolis : Minneapolis Public Schools.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6071288
Abstract: Title on cover and record : Minnesota Indian Employment. Director and narrator, Charles Buckanaga ; writer, John Harper. Presents the employment problems of Indians caused by the lack of education and special job training. Shows some agencies that help find employment.

2128.   (1971). [Audiovisual]. Minneapolis Public Schools. Special School District No. 1. Minneapolis: Minneapolis Public Schools, Special School District No. 1.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6067809
Abstract: Audio visual based Indian resource unit ; no. 1 Audio visual based Indian resource unit. no. 1.
 NOTES: Title on record : The rice maker. Indian title on filmstrip : Menomin-Ika-Sheenhug, the rice maker. Title on container : Wild rice harvest in Minnesota. Director and narrator, Charles Buckanaga ; writer, Esther Nahgahnub. Presents the harvesting of wild rice by the Ojibwe people. Discusses healthy rice fields, the introduction of paddle rice, the mechanical harvesters and the impact of these changes on the life style of the Ojibwe people.

2129.   (1971). [Audiovisual]. Minneapolis Public Schools. Special School District No. 1. Minneapolis: Minneapolis Public Schools, Special School District No. 1.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6071299
Abstract: A project funded under Title III E.S.E.A. Public Law 92-47, Minnesota State Department of Education. Director, Charles Buckanaga ; writers, John Harper and Richard Tanner ; narrator, Ted Mahto. Discusses the logging industry as a transitional step in the changing life style of the American Indian. Shows logging on the Red Lake Indian Reservation

2130.   (1971). [Audiovisual]. Minneapolis Public Schools. Special School District No. l. Minneapolis: Minneapolis Public Schools, Special School District.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6075930
Abstract: A project funded under Title III E.S.E.A. Public Law 92-94, Minnesota State Department of Education. Director, Charles Buckanaga ; writer, Sam Rock. Presents contrasts of living and shows various types of employment and adjustments the Indian had to make with regard to mental attitude and traditions he had practiced

2131.   Minnesota. (1906). Statement of the claim of the state of Minnesota against the United States for a part of the expense incurred in suppressing the Indian war of 1862. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25277767

2132.   Minnesota. American Indian Advisory Task Force on Indian Child Welfare (Ed.). (9999). Minutes (Vols. Description based on: January 20, 1988). [Minn.] : Indian Child Welfare Task Force.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18985947

2133.   Minnesota. Board of Commissioners on Publication of History of Minnesota in Civil and Indian Wars. (1891). Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars, 1861-1865. St. Paul, Minn.  Electrotyped and printed for the State by Pioneer Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24254117. "Prepared and published under the supervision of the Board of Commissioners appointed by the act of the legislature of Minnesota of April 16, 1889." ... accession: 9146380
Abstract: Title of v. 2 : Official reports and correspondence.

2134.   Minnesota Center for Health Statistics. (1980). Minnesota Indian people, selected health statistics. [Minneapolis] : Minnesota Center for Health Statistics, Minnesota Dept. of Health.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18608794 ... accession: 7733414. Cover title.

2135.   Minnesota. Chemical Dependency Program Division. American Indian Advisory Council (Ed.). (9999). Minutes  (Vols. Description based on: August 29, 1986). St. Paul, Minn.  State of Minnesota, Dept. of Human Services, American Indian Advisory Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 15262727

2136.   Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. (1936). Base Enrollments.  personal papers of Lowell Bellanger, White Earth Indian Reservation.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2137.   Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. (individual Indian records. alphabetical card file.  Minnesota Chippewa Tribe archives, Cass Lake, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995:12)

2138.   Minnesota Community College System. (1989). A Report on procedures and policies related to unique needs and abilities of American Indian people. [Minn.] : Minnesota Community College System.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21270732. Title from cover. "February 1989."  ... accession: 19585826

2139.   Minnesota Council of Churches. (1952). Indian neighbors in Minnesota. Answers to your questions about our first Americans. Minneapolis.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25450456. Title from cover.

2140.   . ([1977?]). Minnesota. Crime Control Planning Board. Evaluation UnitAnishinabe Longhouse, final report . [St. Paul?] : Minnesota Crime Control Planning Board, Evaluation Unit.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-07447368. Includes bibliographical references. MINN. DOC. NO. 81-1072.

2141.   . ([1981]). Minnesota. Crime Control Planning Board. Evaluation UnitAnishinabe Longhouse [microform] : final report . [St. Paul?] : Minnesota Crime Control Planning Board, Evaluation Unit .
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-27413575

2142.   Minnesota. Dept. of Administration. (1989). [Report on the feasibility of making state surplus property available to Indian communities]. Saint Paul, Minn.  Minnesota. Dept. of Administration.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19058219. Title supplied by cataloger. "January 3, 1989." ... accession: 21111391

2143.   Minnesota. Dept. of Administration. Management Analysis Division. (1981). A Report describing the process whereby the efforts of the Council on Black Minnesotans, the Council on Affairs of Spanish-Speaking People, the Council on the Economic Status of Women, the Council on the Handicapped, and the Indian Affairs Intertribal Board may be coordinated and may share facilities and staff. St. Paul : Dept. of Administration, Management Analysis Division.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7610738

2144.   Minnesota. Dept. of Conservation, & Aguar, Jyring, Whiteman, Moser, Inc. (1966). Upper Red Lake State Park : feasibility study. Duluth: Aguar, Jyring, Whiteman, Moser.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search). Prepared for the State of Minnesota, Dept. of Conservation.

2145.   Minnesota. Dept. of Conservation, & Aguar, Jyring, Whiteman, Moser, Inc.  (1966). Upper Red Lake State Park : feasibility study : summary of findings and recommendations. Duluth, Minn.  Aguar, Jyring, Whiteman, Moser.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 12872923.  Prepared for the State of Minnesota, Dept. of Conservation. "October, 1966."

2146.   Minnesota. Dept. of Conservation, & Willard, E. V. (1938). Report on plans for water conservation, flood control and drainage, Red Lake and Red Lake river, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30909189

2147.   Minnesota. Dept. of Economic Development. (1968). Tales of Great Spirit : Minnesota Indian legends . St. Paul : Minnesota. Dept. of Economic Development.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4583191. Cover title. Illustrations signed Thor Nielsen.

2148.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. (1969). Minnesota state plan for the education of Indian children. St. Paul : Minnesota. Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4979918. This state plan is in accordance with the provisions of the Johnson-O'Malley Act of 1935, as amended.

2149.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Division of Instruction. (1971). Chippewa Indian language project: grades 3 and 4; Vineland Elementary School; Onamia, Minnesota; 1970-1971. St. Paul : Minnesota. Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4729235

2150.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Indian Education Section. (1972). Annual report to the Office of Indian Affairs, 1971-72 from the director and supervisors of Indian education for the State of Minnesota. St. Paul : Minnesota Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4612697. Cover title : Indian education.

2151.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Indian Education Section. (1969). Annual report to the office of Indian Affairs, for 1968-69. St. Paul : Minnesota Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4612754. Cover title : Indian education in Minnesota.

2152.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Indian Education Section. (1970). Annual report to the office of Indian Affairs, for 1969-70. St. Paul : Minnesota Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19956210

2153.   Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Management Assistance Center. (1988). Management assistance study for Red Lake, I.S.D. No. 38 . [Minn.] : Minnesota. Dept. of Education. Management Assistance Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 17699875, accession: 20426481.

2154.   Minnesota. Dept. of Energy and Economic Development. (1980). [Community profiles for cities and towns in development region 10]. St. Paul : Minnesota Dept. of Energy and Economic Development.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 16569147
Abstract: Cataloguer-supplied title. Includes information on population, industry, employment, transportation, commercial/industrial taxes, government, utilities, community services, education, climate, industrial sites, and location services.   Cities and towns, Minnesota: Albert Lea. Alden. Austin. Blooming Prairie. Cannon Falls. Dodge Center. Faribault. Grand Meadow. Harmony. Hayfield. Houston. La Crescent. Lake City. Northfield. Owatonna. Pine Island. Red Wing. Rochester. Saint Charles. Spring Grove. Spring Valley. Wabasha. Winona. Zumbrota. Adams. Bryon. Chatfield. Brownsdale. Caledonia. Dexter. Le Roy. Lewiston. Rose Creek.

2155.   Minnesota. Dept. of Health. Office of Community Development. (1980). Minnesota Indian people health care guidelines. [Minneapolis?] : Office of Community Development, Minnesota Dept. of Health.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7155311. "May 1980." Bibliography: p. 47.

2156.   Minnesota. Dept. of Human Services. Social Service Research and Statistics. (1984). Indian children in substitute care . St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota. Dept. of Human Services.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14938807

2157.   Minnesota canoe routes [Explore Minnesota]. (1982). [St. Paul] : Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29524488. On cover: Explore Minnesota. Each map has separate title and publication date.
Abstract: Minnesota. Dept. of Natural Resources. Big Fork River canoe route. Cannon River canoe route. Cloquet River canoe route (Island Lake Reservoir to St. Louis River). Crow Wing River canoe route. Des Moines River canoe route. Kettle River canoe route. Little Fork River canoe route. Minnesota River canoe route. Mississippi River canoe route. North Fork Crow River canoe route. Red Lake River canoe route. Root River canoe route. Rum River canoe route. St. Croix River canoe route. St. Louis River canoe route. Snake River canoe route. Straight River canoe route. Vermilion River canoe route. Zumbro River canoe route.

2158.   Minnesota. Dept. of Natural Resources. (1977). Red Lake River canoe route. St. Paul : Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

2159.   Minnesota. Division ... (1929). White pine blister rust control files of Jake ...
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2160.   Minnesota. Division of Social Welfare. (1948). Indian study. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25450544. Title from cover.

2161.   Minnesota. Governor'  ... (1962). Report of Indian guide program, June 18-Aug.  ...
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2162.   Minnesota. Governor  . (1983). Washington office files.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2163.   Minnesota. Governor's Advisory Council on Children and Youth. (1962). Report of Indian guide program, June 18- Aug. 25, 1962. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25472681

2164.   . (1974). Minnesota. Governor's Commission on Crime Prevention and Control. Project Evaluation Unit.Anishinabe Longhouse : a preliminary report / prepared by Project Evaluation Unit, Governor's Commission on Crime Prevention and Control . [St. Paul, Minn.] : Project Evaluation Unit, Governor's Commission on Crime Prevention and Control.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-11851385

2165.   . (1974). : Minnesota. Governor's Commission on Crime Prevention and Control. Project Evaluation UnitAnishinabe Waki-Gan, Inc. : a preliminary evaluation report report / prepared by Project Evaluation Unit, Governor's Commission on Crime Prevention and Control . [St. Paul, Minn.] : by Project Evaluation Unit.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-11853413

2166.   Minnesota. Governor's Human Rights Commission. (1952). The Indian in Minnesota; a report to Governor C. Elmer Anderson of Minnesota. [St. Paul?].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4716703

2167.   Minnesota. Governor's Human Rights Commission. (1947). The Indian in Minnesota; a report to Governor Luther W. Youngdahl of Minnesota. [St. Paul].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 3791953. "Second of a series of reports ... on various racial and religious situations." Bibliography: p. 78-80.

2168.   Minnesota. Governor's Human Rights Commission. (1957). Minnesota Indian workers; a survey analysis. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25450494. Title from cover.

2169.   Minnesota. Governor's Human Rights Commission. (1957). Proceedings of the second statewide conference on Indian affairs, May 31 - June 1, 1957. St. Paul .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19437596

2170.   The Indian in Minnesota. (1949). Minnesota. Governor's Interracial Commission[Miscellaneous publications] . St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21788555. Title supplied by General Library, University of California, Berkeley. [1] The Indian in Minnesota.--[2] It's the law in Minnesota.-- [3] The Mexican in Minnesota.--[4] Negro worker's progress in Minnesota.--[5] The Oriental in Minnesota.

2171.   Minnesota. Governor's Interracial Commission. (1948). Race relations in Minnesota; reports of the commission. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 3041211
Abstract: "A series of reports [March 10, 1945- August 15, 1948] to the Governor on various racial and religious situations." Each part also pub. separately. Includes bibliographies. --The Negro worker.--The Negro and his home.--The Indian.-- The Mexican.

2172.   Minnesota. Highway Dept. (1924). Proposed development for Pipestone state park, Pipestone, Minnesota. Prepared under the direction of the Commissioner of highways, 1924, by the order of the governor. Pipestone, Mn.  Printed by the Pipestone Leader.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7867742. Cover title. A petition to the legislature of the state of Minnesota.-- Report to the Hon. R.P. Chase, State auditor, by W.R. Stoopes.--Indian legends

2173.   Minnesota Historical Society. (1911). The aborigines of Minnesota a report based on the collections of Jacob V. Brower, and on the field surveys and notes of Alfred J. Hill and Theodore H. Lewis . St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
At head of title: The Minnesota Historical Society ... 1906-1911. Includes bibliographical references and index. Microfilm. Ann Arbor, Mich. : Xerox Microforms Systems, 1974. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm.

2174.   . (1898). Minnesota Historical SocietyCollections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII . St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25322530
Abstract: Spine title: Minnesota Historical Society collections. Contents: The international boundary between Lake Superior and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. (cont) The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell -- Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896 / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham -- History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Obituaries.
 SUBJECT: Minnesota -- History. Minnesota -- Discovery and exploration. Mississippi River -- Discovery and exploration. Minnesota -- Biography. Minnesota -- Description and travel.

2175.   Minnesota Historical Society. (1895). Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII, part 1. St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 37844696
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior and the Lake of the Woods / Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N. H. Winchell.

2176.   (1962). St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Soiceity.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:98), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "General information sheet telling of the treaties, reservations and gifts of the Indians."

2177.   Ojibwa personal names. (1911). Minnesota Historical Society.The aborigines of Minnesota a report based on the collections of Jacob V. Brower, and on the field surveys and notes of Alfred J. Hill and Theodore H. Lewis   (pp. 707-731). St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
 At head of title: The Minnesota Historical Society ... 1906-1911. Includes bibliographical references and index. Microfilm. Ann Arbor, Mich. : Xerox Microforms Systems, 1974. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm.

2178.   Minnesota Historical Society, & Warming, I. B. (1936). Minnesotans in the civil and Indian wars : an index to the rosters in Minnesota in the civil and Indian wars, 1861-1865, compiled as a W. P. A. project for the Minnesota historical society under the direction of Irene B. Warming, reference assistant. St. Paul, Minn.  The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7409907. Other: Warming, Irene B. (Irene Bulov), 1904-1970. United States. Works Progress Administration, Minnesota. Minnesota. Board of Commissioners on Publication of History of Minnesota in Civil and Indian Wars. ... accession: 4811606
Abstract: "The index was made from rosters in the first volume of Minnesota in the civil and Indian wars, 1881-1865... published in St. Paul in 1890 by a board of commissioners appointed by act of the Legislature of Minnesota."

2179.   Minnesota Historical Society Library and Archives Division. (1989). Genealogical Resources of the Minnesota Historical Society, A Guide. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Includes bibliographical references.

2180.   Minnesota Housing Finance Agency. (1986). Deferred housing rehabilitation loans for members of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe and the Red Lake band of Chippewa Indians : a report to the Legislature. St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota Housing Finance Agency.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13209994, accession: 21390187.  Title from cover.

2181.   Minnesota Housing Finance Agency. (1988). Deferred housing rehabilitation loans for members of the Minnesota Chippewa tribe and the Red Lake band of Chippewa Indians : a report to the Legislature. St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota Housing Finance Agency.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 17594986, accession: 20397770.  Title from cover.

2182.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Board. (1976). Special report of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Board. [St. Paul] : Minnesota Indian Affairs Board.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 2648127. Cover title.

2183.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council (Ed.). (1984). Annual Report of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council (Vols. 1984-). St. Paul, Minn.  Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23136542. Alt Title: Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council. Report of the Indian Affairs Council. ... accession: 11433173.  Some issues have title: Annual report.

2184.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council (Ed.). (9999). Minutes (Vols. Description based on: January 16, 1986). [St. Paul, Minn.] : State of Minnesota, Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14257625

2185.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council (Ed.). (1983). Report of the Indian Affairs Council (Vols. 1983-). St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 10244364. Title from cover. Alt Title: Minnesota. Indian Affairs Intertribal Board. Report of the Indian Affairs Intertribal Board (OCoLC)7110347 (DLC) 81640613 Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council. Annual report of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council (DLC) 92642415 (OCoLC)11433173

2186.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council. (1984). Special report of the Indian Affairs Council. St. Paul, Minn.  Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 10523635. "March 1, 1984."

2187.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council. Minnesota. Chemical Dependency Program Division. (1991). Report on American Indian adolescent chemical dependency program models. [St. Paul, Minn.] : Minnesota Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26829820 ... accession: 25660950.

2188.   Minnesota. Indian Affairs Intertribal Board (Ed.). (1977). Report of the Indian Affairs Intertribal Board (Vols. Nov. 15, 1977-). St. Paul, Minn.  Indian Affairs Intertribal Board.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7110347. Alt Title: Annual report Nov. 15, 1978- Minnesota. Indian Affairs Council. Report of the Affairs Council. Other: Minnesota. Indian Affairs Intertribal Board. Annual report.

2189.   Minnesota Indian Consortium for Higher Education. (1977). A proposal to operate the developmental phase of Minnesota Indian Consortium for Higher Education. St. Paul, MN : Minnesota Indian Consortium for Higher Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23068585

2190.   Minnesota Indian Education Association (Ed.). (1988). Indian Educator (Vols. Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan.-Mar. 1988)- ). Minneapolis, MN : Minnesota Indian Education Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25813408. Title from caption.

2191.   Minnesota. Indian Education Committee (Ed.). (9999). Report to the Office of Indian Affairs, From the Directors and Supervisors of Indian Education [St. Paul?] : Minnesota. Indian Affairs Commission.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6066851

2192.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. (1980). American Indian language and culture education. [St. Paul?] : Minnesota Dept. of Education, Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 15277478. Cover title. "March 1980."

2193.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. (1980). Indian adult basic education. [St. Paul?] : Minnesota. Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8621916. Cover title. ... accession: 7429991

2194.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. (1980). Minnesota Indian student retention project report. [St. Paul] : Minnesota. Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8621912. Cover title. ... accession: 6327482 [1979]

2195.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. (1980). Minnesota Indian student retention project report summary . [St. Paul] : Minnesota. Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18501167

2196.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section (Ed.). (9999). Report to the Legislature, Minnesota Indian Scholarship Program (Vols. Description based on: 1984-85). St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota. Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26747505. Alt Title: Minnesota Indian scholarship program. ... accession: 11600952

2197.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. (1980). A report to the Legislature on American Indian language and culture education. [St. Paul?] : Minnesota Dept. of Education, Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8414416. Cover title. Bibliography: p. 45-46. ... accession: 7470188. Cover title. "January 1980."

2198.   Minnesota. Indian Education Section. Indian career development and placement program. (1988). Education is working : Indian career development and placement program : a proposal, September 1, 1988 to June 30, 1991. St. Paul, Minn.  Indian Education Section, Minnesota State Dept. of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18762787 ... accession: 19462664
Abstract: Title from cover. "May 1, 1988." "[prepared] in consultation with Minnesota Indian Scholarship Committee, Minnesota State Board of Education."

2199.   Minnesota Indian Scholarship Committee (Ed.). (9999). Minutes (Vols. Description based on: September 3, 1986). [Minn.] : Minnesota Indian Scholarship Committee.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 15099668

2200.   Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center. (1984). [Report on the Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center]. Minneapolis, Minn.  Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13460785. Title supplied by cataloger. "October 3, 1984."

2201.   Minnesota. Industrial Development Division. (1977). Minnesota directory of Indian businesses . St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota. Industrial Development Division.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4707219. Cover title.

2202.   Minnesota Institute of Public Health. Minnesota. Chemical Dependency Program Division. American Indian Programs Section. (1985). Being free : a teacher's guide to healthy choices about alcohol & drugs for American Indian youth. Minn.  Minnesota Institute of Public Health.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13539995. "Developed by the Minnesota Institute of Public Health, under contract with American Indian Programs Section of the Chemical Dependency Programs Division, Minnesota Department of Human Services." "June 1985." Includes bibliographical references.

2203.   Minnesota. Interim Commission on Indian Affairs. (1959). Minutes Washington, D.C. meetings : 1958 Minnesota Legislative Interim Commission on Indian Affairs : February 9-10, 1959. [St. Paul, Minn.] : Minnesota Legislative Interim Commission on Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 17930446. Caption title.

2204.   Minnesota. Legislature. (1893). Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars, 1861-1865. St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13551991

2205.   Minnesota. Legislature. House of Representatives. Natural Resources Committee. Subcommittee on Wild Rice and Indian Natural Resources. (1973). Final report 1971-72 interim. [St. Paul, Minn.] : State of Minnesota, House Research Department.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12159414. Title from cover. "January 30, 1973."  Other: Minnesota. Legislature. House of Representatives. Research Dept

2206.   Minnesota. Legislature. House of Representatives. Research Dept. (1971). Indian programs and legislation . [St. Paul, Minn.] : State of Minnesota, House Research Dept.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 17800778. Title from cover. "May 20, 1971."

2207.   Minnesota. Legislature. Indian Affairs Commission. (1961). Report of the Indian Affairs Commission : submitted to the Legislature of the State of Minnesota. Saint Paul? Minn.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13041539. Title from cover.

2208.   Minnesota. Legislature. Interim Commission on Indian Affairs. (1959). Report of the 1958 Minnesota Interim Commission on Indian Affairs to the Hon. Orville L. Freeman, Governor of Minnesota, and the members of the Minnesota Legislature. [St. Paul?] : Minnesota Interim Commission on Indian Affairs .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12400332. Cover title. Does not include the chapter "How can Minnesotans - Red and White - help each other," nor portraits of contributors, found in the 100 p. ed. ... accession: 4084586. 100 p. : ports. ; 22 cm.

2209.   Minnesota. Legislature. Pine Land Investigating Committee. (1895). Report of the Pine Lands Investigating Committee : to the Governor of Minnesota, filed with the Governor December 21, 1894. St. Paul, Minn.  Pioneer Press Co., state printers.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 10416287, 9959864.  "Five thousand copies ordered printed for the use of the Legislature, 1895." Ignatius Donnelly, chairman of the committee. Includes index.  Other: Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831-1901. Minnesota. Governor (1893-1895 : Nelson).
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2210.   Minnesota. Legislature. Senate. Interim Committee on Indian Affairs. (1957). Report of the Interim Committee on Indian Affairs . Saint Paul, Minn.  Interim Committee on Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13107694

2211.   Minnesota. Legislature. Senate. Interim Committee on Indian Affairs. (1953). Report of the Senate Interim Committee on Indian Affairs to the 1953 session of the Minnesota Legislature. [St. Paul, Minn.] : Senate Interim Committee on Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 15512283

2212.   Minnesota. Legislature. Senate. Interim Committee on Indian Affairs. (1950). Report of the Senate Interim Committee on Indian Affairs to the 1951 Legislature. [Minn.] : Senate Interim Committee on Indian Affairs .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12845313. Title from cover. "December 1950."

2213.   Minnesota. Legislature. Senate. Pine Land Committee. (1874). Report of the Pine Land Committee to the Senate of the State of Minnesota. Saint Paul?.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27462821.  Title from caption. Signed: Ignatius Donnelly, chairman. Presented March 3d, 1874, and ordered printed.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2214.   (1977). [Audiovisual]. Minnesota Library Association. [Minneapolis] : Minnesota Library Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7142658
Abstract: Speeches. 1. How to begin the search / Patricia Harpole -- 2. The Mormon collections / Wiley Pope -- 3. Historical Society centers and the Minnesota archives/manuscripts / Dalles Lindgren Chrislock and James E. Fogerty. Ethnic searches : Norwegian / Forrest Brown -- 4. Ethnic searches : Blacks / Pat Harpole. Ethnic searches : Indian / Virginia Rogers. Ethnic searches : French Canadian / Paul Lareau.

2215.   Minnesota. Office of the Legislative Auditor. Financial Audits Division. (1981). Audit report, Indian Affairs Intertribal Board, years ended June 30, 1979 and 1980. [St. Paul, Minn.] : Office of the Legislative Auditor, Financial Audits Division.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7491569

2216.   Minnesota. Office of the Legislative Auditor. Financial Audits Division (Ed.). (9999). Indian Affairs Council Financial and Compliance Audit for Two Years Ended June 30, ... (Vols. Description based on: 1985.). Saint Paul, Minn.  Financial Audit Division, Office of the Legislative Auditor, State of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19999881

2217.   Minnesota. Office of the Legislative Auditor. Financial Audits Division. (1986). Indian Affairs Council financial and compliance audit for two years ended June 30, 1985. St. Paul, Minn.  Financial Audit Division, Office of the Legislative Auditor, State of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13577967. Title from cover. "May 1986."

2218.   Minnesota Pollution Control Agency , & Red Lake Watershed District. (1993). Red Lake Watershed District annual report, 1993 . Thief River Falls, MN : Red Lake Watershed District.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30572999. "A clean water partnership project, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency." Cover title.

2219.   Minnesota. State Auditor. (1986). Report of the State Auditor on Minnesota Department of Jobs and Training federal and state grants awarded to Red Lake reservation community action program for the two years ended September 30, 1985. St. Paul, Minn.  State Auditor.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 14228390.  Other: Red Lake Reservation Community Action Program. ... accession: 27232797
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

2220.   Minnesota. State Auditor. (1987). Report of the State Auditor on the financial affairs of the Red Lake Reservation Community Action Program, Red Lake, Minnesota, for the year ended September 30, 1986. Saint Paul, Minn.  State Auditor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 16733388, accession: 20815839.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search) [two entries]

2221.   Minnesota. State Board of Education. (1986). Comprehensive statewide plan for Indian education.  Minnesota State Board of Education?.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 20618327. Title from cover. "October 7, 1986." ... accession: 15069761

2222.   Minnesota. State Board of Education. (1986). Comprehensive statewide plan for Indian education. [St. Paul, MN] : Minnesota State Board of Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18300967. Title from cover. "Adopted November 1986." ... accession: 15539786

2223.   Minnesota. State Board of Education. (1986). [Minnesota State Board of Education's report on Indian education]. [St. Paul, Minn.] : Minnesota State Board of Education.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 14712161, accession: 21533113. ... accession: 20992784.
Abstract: Title supplied by cataloger. Johnson O'Malley contract, 1936 -- Statewide Indian education hearing, 1976 -- Indian education policy, 1982 -- State Board community visits :Red lake, Fond du Lac, and Cass Lake, 1984 - - Report of the statewide Indian needs assessment.

2224.   Minnesota State Planning Agency. Human Resources Planning Unit. (1981). Report on Indian needs. [St. Paul?] : Minnesota State Planning Agency, Human Resources Division.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19037475. Cover title. "February, 1981." Includes bibliographical references. ... accession: 7156877

2225.   Minnesota. Task Force on Indian Education. (1983). 1983 Indian Task Force report. St. Paul, Minn: Minnesota State Board for Vocational Education Task Force on Indian Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 9472190. Caption title.

2226.   Minnesota. Water Pollution Control Commission. (1966). In the matter of the pollution of the Red River of the North and major tributaries : findings of fact, conclusions and order. Saint Paul, Minn.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30609091. Title from caption.

2227.   Minore, B., Boone, M., & Katt, M. A. (1991). Looking in, Looking Out: Coping with Adolescent Suicide in the Cree and Ojibway Communities of Northern Ontario. The Canadian Journal of Native Studies, 11(1), 1.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

2228.   Minore, B., Katt, M., Kinch, P., & Boone, M. (1991). Looking in, looking out: coping wih adolescent suicide in the Cree and Ojibway communities of northern Ontario. Canadian Journal of Native Studies [Brandon], 11(1), 1-24.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2229.   Mitchel, M. (1856). Geographical and statistical history of the county of Winnebago : with interesting incidents among the aborigines and pioneer settlers : to which is prefixed a general view of the state of Wisconsin, together with a census table from its first settlement to the present time . Oshkosh : Mitchel & Smith.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Written by the publishers.

2230.   Mitchell, C. M., Novins, D. K., & Holmes, T. (1999). Marijuana Use Among American Indian Adolescents: a Growth Curve Analysis From Ages 14 Through 20 Years. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 38(1), 72-78.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe the developmental course of marijuana use among a group of American Indian adolescents, aged 14 through 20 years. METHOD: A group of 1,766 American Indian adolescents from 3 culture groups provided repeated measures of 30-day marijuana use twice a year across a 3-year period. Linking 5 age cohorts, hierarchical linear modeling was used to model a curvilinear trajectory of marijuana use. Gender and community differences were examined as well. RESULTS: Support was found for a 'maturational' model of marijuana use across time: Use increased in middle adolescence, peaked in later adolescence, and began to decrease in early adulthood. Both gender and community differences in trajectories were significant as well. CONCLUSIONS: Marijuana use among American Indian adolescents follows a clear developmental trajectory. Growth curve analysis can provide an additional tool for studying the effects of interventions that may not be apparent in a traditional evaluation design.  (Abstract by: Author)

2231.   Mitchell, M. (1988). Ojibwa vocabulary aquisition. Papers, Algonquian Conference, (18), 201-208.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2232.   Mittelholtz, E. F., & Graves, R. (1957). Historical review of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, centennial souvenir commemorating a century of progress [... a history of its people and progress]. Leader-Record Press, Clearbrook and Gonvick, MN//Bemidji, MN : General Council of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians//Beltrami County Historical Society.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:103), "Bibliography"
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ... accession: 26176508

2233.   Mitten, L. A. (1995). The Manitous - the Spiritual World of the Ojibway - Johnston,B. Library Journal, 120(13), 82.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2234.   Mlinarcik, J. D. (1990). Alcoholic personality types revisited: Ala Kahler's process communication theory. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Fielding Institute.
Abstract: This study sought to determine if Reactive, Type II alcoholics display differing personality types and constellations based on Process Communication Theory, using the Personality Pattern Inventory (PPI). Forty inpatient and 40 outpatient male alcoholics were identified. Subjects were drawn from hospitals, treatment programs and clinics throughout Michigan. Each was individually matched with normal, nonalcoholic males, on the basis of age (plus or minus 5 years), marital status, educational achievement, employment history, occupational category, and income level. Subjects ranged in age from 21 to 69 and were Caucasian or native American. Participants were controlled for concurrent psychotic illnesses, the taking of prescribed antipsychotic medications, and for illicit substance abuse. Effort was made to identify as many alcoholic subjects as possible without a first generation positive family alcohol history. Selzer's Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test and Rudi-McGaughran's Essential-Reactive Alcoholism Dimension were utilized in the study. The PPI was given to all alcoholic and comparison subjects. The investigation revealed that Reactive, Type II alcoholics had significantly lower mean Workaholic scores on the PPI than the matched, nonalcoholic comparison subjects. Further, with the exception of outpatient Persister alcoholics, all Reactor and Persister alcoholic group subjects had significantly lower mean  Workaholic scores on the PPI.  Confirmed in the study was that significantly greater frequencies of Reactor and Persister personality  types were present in the alcoholic groups than in the matched nonalcoholic groups. Significantly greater frequencies of Workaholic and Rebel personality types were found within the combined  comparison groups than the alcoholic groups. The results of this study have supported the movement favoring etiological theories that certain personality and psychological factors may lead to the development of Type II, 'Process-Reactive Alcoholism.' There are subsequent implications for the early detection, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this disorder.

2235.   Moffat Tina. (1994). Infant Mortality & Cultural Concepts Of Infancy: A Case Study From An Early Twentieth Century Aboriginal Community. Pre- And Perinatal Psychology Journal, 8(4), 259-273.
Notes: Source: Family Studies database [University of Minnesota onlinedatabase], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: This article explores the impact of infant death on cultural perceptions of infancy. It employs a case study of the Cree-Ojibwa community of Fisher River, Manitoba in the early twentieth century to illustrate how a high risk of infant death can delay the point at which personhood is conferred on an infant. Further to this, the concept of infancy among the aboriginal community is contrasted with wider Euro-Canadian values concerning the infant mortality rate. Differing cultural perceptions surrounding infant death provided the Canadian government with rationale to contest aboriginal autonomy over child welfare. Copyright, National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) 1994

2236.   Mohawk Council of Kahnawake. (1990).  Institutions of Mohawk government in  Kahnawake : an overview . Kahnawake, Quebec : The Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

2237.   Molin, P. F. (1986). Places where I've lived." . Roots, 14(3), special issue, "On the Reservation".
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13709117
Abstract: Title from cover. Coming home / by Carolyn Gilman -- "Places where I've lived" / by Paulette Fairbanks Molin -- Laurel Hole In the Day / by Gerald Vizenor -- Portrait of Red Lake / photos by Charles Brill -- Digging deeper, branching out / by Stephen Sandell

2238.   Molyneaux, B. L. (1987). Lake of the painted cave. Archaeology, 40(4), 18-25, ill.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2239.   Monaghan, P. (1995). The Manitous: The Spiritual World of the Ojibway (book reviews). Booklist, 191(22), 1914 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Ethnotogist Johnston bridges several worlds in this book that is both exemplary original scholarship and a delightfully, even charmingly written set of stories that, although written for adults, can be appreciated by those of any age, for, based in oral tradition, they read as if they have voices. From his own cultural heritage, that of the Ojibway who are called, by themselves, Anishiaubae, and by later American settlers, Chippewa), Johnston has gathered scores of tales of manitous, the spirits that are both elemental forces and divinities. In these pages we encounter Kitchi-Manitou, the genderless divine force, and Muzu-Kummik-Quae, the earth-mother, as well as the fearsome cannibal Weendigo. Many of their stories are recorded here for the first time, which by itself makes this a valuable addition to collections of Native American spirituality. Meanwhile, the wit and ease with which Johnston writes make it a good selection for general reading collections, too.

2240.   Moncher, M., Holden, G. W., & Trimble, J. E. Substance Use and Abuse Among American-Indian Youth Interview Schedule. PS. to Moncher, M. S., Holden, G. W., & Trimble, J. E. (1990). Substance Abuse Among Native-American Youth.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 58, 408-415.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

2241.   Monette, G. E. '. (1996). Follow-up study of the graduates of an American Indian tribally controlled community college (Native Americans, Chippewa). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of North Dakota.
Abstract: This study obtained demographic data and information concerning the academic experiences, transfer experiences, and employment experiences of Turtle Mountain Community College (TMCC) students who graduated from 1980 to 1990, as determined by responses to a questionnaire which was developed for this specific purpose. There were 278 respondents to the survey, and they represented 55.2% of the total number of student graduates. The data were analyzed utilizing the t test and Chi-square techniques to determine significant differences of variables between graduates on the basis of gender and by year of graduation. The testable hypotheses were stated in the null form, and alpha was set at the.05 level of significance. A statistically significant difference was found when comparing the level of satisfaction at TMCC and at the four-year transfer institution and when comparing whether TMCC should have helped and actually did help graduates. There was a statistically significant difference according to year of graduation in the categories of highest degree currently held, whether current job was related to TMCC program of study, current job location, and job classification. There was a statistically significant difference between males and females in the categories of age, situation prior to entering TMCC, important reasons for attending TMCC, whether the most important reason was satisfied, whether TMCC helped to achieve the main reason for attending TMCC, and when comparing the four-year transfer institution to TMCC. The data led to the conclusion that TMCC is providing access to postsecondary education for Chippewa tribal members. Graduates were likely to be employed in professional and skilled occupations on the reservation. Graduates were generally positive about TMCC's academic programs. Academics were appropriate and were meeting the needs of the students. The college was viewed as responsive to tribal educational needs, and the curriculum was  perceived as reflecting these needs. Indian instructors and Indian culture integrated into programs were important reasons for attending TMCC. TMCC met its transfer mission. In-state four-year transfer colleges enrolled most graduates who transferred. The quality of instruction at TMCC was perceived to be equal to that of the transfer institution.

2242.   Montfort, M. M. (1990). Ethnic and tribal identity among the Saginaw Chippewa of nineteenth century Michigan. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: This study examines the evolution of ethnic and tribal identity among the Saginaw Chippewa of Michigan's Lower Peninsula between 1800 and 1840. Referred to as the Treaty period, this time frame encompasses the majority of land cessions that involved the Saginaw Chippewa. These cessions and the settlement of the Michigan frontier by pioneers resulted in alterations to mobility patterns, subsistence orientation and sociopolitical organization, all of which contributed to changes in ethnic and tribal identities. The method used in this study was ethnohistorical reconstruction based primarily on government records and pioneer accounts. Two trends are evident in the data. (1) Consolidation took place as the U.S. government encouraged the development of a Saginaw Chippewa tribal identity and (2) fragmentation occurred as local level units of identification struggled to re-define themselves in the context of pioneer settlement and increasing dependence on government funds and services.

2243.   Montgomerie, D. A. (1994). Coming to terms: Ngi Tahu, Robeson County Indians and the Garden River band of Ojibwa, 1840-1940.  Three studies of colonialism in action (New Zealand, North Carolina, Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Duke University.
Abstract: This dissertation examines colonization as an historical process through case studies of Ngai Tahu, a group of Maori inhabiting the southern portion of the South Island of New Zealand, the Garden River band of Ojibwa of the northern shore of Lake Huron, and the Indian communities of Robeson County, North Carolina. The narratives begin in the early nineteenth century and follow each group into the early twentieth century. By 1840 these groups had all experienced several generations of contact with Europeans. While none was untouched by European expansion, in 1840 each retained considerable autonomy. During the period 1840-1940 the indigenous inhabitants of Robeson County, the South Island of New Zealand and South-western Ontario were all brought within the ambit of colonial authority. Their systems of land-holding, schooling, political participation and production radically changed. Yet, despite economic hardship, cultural change and multi-faceted pressures to assimilate, all three retained a sense of group distinctiveness. Certain types of authority had been conceded to the colonial centerother forms of authority--in particular the right to ethnic and racial self-definition, had been fiercely maintained. Juxtaposing these histories provides insight into the historic subordination and modern resurgence of indigenous peoples in three white settler colonies. It also illustrates the extent to which the subordination of native peoples was the product of the political economy of colonialism, not the inherent weakness of indigenous societies. Native people could build community identities out of the process of historical struggle even when they abandoned many of the cultural practices that initially distinguished them from European immigrants. Moreover, the narratives show that despite the superior force of the imperial authorities and their colonial successor states, native societies could negotiate and manoeuver within the confines of the colonial process. Furthermore, the dissertation argues against comparisons of colonialism that rank imperialisms, or compare 'good' and 'bad' imperialisms, as inadequate for incorporating the complexity of native experiences or the subtleties of native resistance. Though broad parallels may be drawn, especially in relation to the material and environmental changes wrought by colonialism, comparison is also a tool for understanding difference and historical contingency. While identifying parallel processes at work, analysis underlines the particularity of each colonial encounter.

2244.   Montgomery, R. (1962). The capture of West Wind. Des Moines, Iowa: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:94), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "This book presents the author's idea of how the first Indian caught and rode a horse.  Grades 4-6."

2245.   Montour, L. T., Macaulay, A. C., & Adelson, N. (1989). Diabetes Mellitus in Mohawks of Kahnawake, Pq: a Clinical and Epidemiologic Description. Cmaj.  141(6), 549-52.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The authors report the rates of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and macrovascular and microvascular complications among Mohawks of Kahnawake, PQ, who have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The data were derived from a study comparing rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications among the diabetic subjects and a nondiabetic group matched for age and sex. The data for both groups were collected by means of chart review, interview and body measurement. There were no important differences between the male and female diabetic subjects. Both sexes had high levels of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetic complications. A total of 86% of the diabetic subjects were obese; the rate was also very high (74%) among the nondiabetic subjects. The mean age at onset of diabetes, 59 years, was 10 years higher than that observed in Oneida Iroquois of Ontario. The rates of macrovascular disease among the diabetic subjects were higher than those found among Cree/Ojibwa in Ontario and Manitoba. Our findings add to the knowledge of non-insulin-dependent diabetes in North American Indians in Canada and show that there are differences between our Mohawk subjects and diabetic people of other native communities.  (Abstract by: Author)

2246.   . (1928). J. MooneyThe aboriginal population of America north of Mexico . Washington, D.C.
Notes: Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)

2247.   Moore, D. L. (1995). Native knowing: the politics of epistemology in American and Native American literature. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Washington.
Abstract: This study derives a theory of reading American and Native American literatures from nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. It compares two periods of postcolonial efforts in American literary history, the 'American Renaissance' and the 'Native American Renaissance,' focusing on representations of colonial self and other in selected works of Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, and Frederick Douglass, from the former period, and Gerald Vizenor, Ray A. Young Bear, and Leslie Marmon Silko, from the latter. Two epistemologies, dialectic and dialogic, emerge from the texts, forming an open-ended binary: one end is dualistic and objectifying, and the other is multiple and participatory. The colonial dialectic builds binaries of civilization-wilderness, master-slave, white-Indian, noble-savage. Readers reflect those epistemologies, mirroring ways that cultures conceive of power and identity as hierarchical and static or as interactive and dynamic. Epistemology thus links readers with ethics, and aesthetics, by dialectic and dialogic ways of thinking. Whitman's catalogs frequently eclipse American 'others,' because of his roots in an American dialectic. In Melville's 'Benito Cereno' and in Douglass's Narrative, the dialectic of slavery often prohibits American others from assuming dialogic relations to elude the colonial gaze. In Silko and Young Bear, literary links to their Laguna and Mesquakie oral traditions provide mythic possibilities for postcolonial dialogics. And in Vizenor, his trope of a mixedblood Ojibwa trickster becomes a language game in the dialogic revisioning of colonial history. Colonial and postcolonial conflicts are not so much in the dialectical clash of cultures, but rather in the misalignment of dialectical, oppositional aspects of cultures against dialogical, transactional aspects. The writings of Vizenor, Silko, and Young Bear clarify dialogic ways to negotiate the binaries of American history, a dialectical history which often seemed to overwhelm Whitman, Melville, and Douglass. Readers of these Native American writers are shown by the narratives and the poems how they necessarily participate in the ethics of reading and reinscribing dialectical or dialogical possibilities.

2248.   Moorehead, W. K. The Indian Tribes of Ohio: Historically Considered, a Preliminary Paper.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2249.   Moorehead, W. K. Primitive Man in Ohio.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2250.   Moorhead, W. K. (1914). The American Indian in the United States: period 1850 to 1914. Andover, MA: Andover Press.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:103), "Bibliography"

2251.   Morantz, T. (1997). The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1970 - Peers, L. Canadian Historical Review, 78(1), 167-169.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

2252.   Morgan, J. N., Berry, M. R., & Graves, R. L. (1997). Effects of Commonly Used Cooking Practices on Total Mercury Concentration in Fish and Their Impact on Exposure Assessments. Journal of Exposure Analysis & Environmental Epidemiology, 7(1), 119-133.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Abstract: The effects of cooking practices commonly used by Native Americans on total mercury concentrations in fish were investigated. A preparation factor relating mercury concentrations in fish as prepared for consumption to mercury concentration data as measured in typical environmental monitoring programs was calculated. Preparation factors are needed to provide risk assessors with a more accurate estimate of the actual amount of mercury ingested through consumption of contaminated fish. Data on fish preparation and consumption practices of two communities of Chippewa residing on the shores of Lake Superior in northern Wisconsin were used to select practices for study. The most commonly consumed species, walleye and lake trout, were selected. Whitefish livers were also selected for study. Commonly used cooking techniques including panfrying, deep-frying, baking, boiling, and smoking were duplicated in the laboratory. Total mercury concentrations were determined in fish portions before and after cooking and in a portion representative of that analyzed in programs to assess water quality (skin-on fillets). Total mercury was determined by microwave digestion-cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mercury concentrations (wet weight basis) in panfried, baked, and boiled walleye fillets and deep-fried and baked whitefish livers ranged from 1.1 to 1.5 times higher than in corresponding raw portions. In lake trout, mercury concentrations were 1.5 to 2.0 times higher in cooked portions than in the raw portion. However, total mercury levels were constant before and after cooking, indicating the concentration effect is caused by weight (moisture and fat) loss. The addition of lemon juice to potentially release mercury from its bound state and promote volatilization did not exert any measurable influence on mercury concentrations in cooked walleye. In some cases mercury concentrations were increased with increased cooking times due to further loss of moisture and fat. Preparation factors (defined as the ratio of mercury concentration in cooked fish to the mercury concentration in the environmental portion) ranged from 1.3 to 2.0. Results suggest that consideration be given to the use of preparation factors in risk assessments, exposure assessments, or issuance of fish advisories where mercury concentration in raw fish tissue are used in conjunction with cooked fish meal sizes.  (Abstract by: Author)

2253.   Morgan, K. (1997). Shingebiss: An Ojibwe Legend (book review). Booklist, 93(21), 1820 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Gr. 3-4, younger for reading aloud. in this picture book for older readers, Kabibona'kan, Winter Maker, seems determined to let Shingebiss, a merganser duck, freeze to death. But even though the plucky bird has only four logs to warm his lodge during the winter months, he is still able to stand strong against his great opponent. The names in this Ojibwe legend may be hard for children to pronounce, and the story contains references to a time frame that's different than our calendar year. Despite that, readers and listeners will enjoy the story and identify with Shingebiss' courage and absolute determination to outlast hard times. Bowen's woodcuts extend the text, heightening the difference between the story's setting and our own times. A glossary, source notes, and some engrossing information on how the illustrations were executed are included.

2254.   . (1959). L. H. MorganThe Indian Journals, 1859-62 . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "[I] (M)", page 3, item 26

2255.   Morgan, T. J. (1890 March).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

2256.   Moriarity, J. (1992). American Indian Health: Providers, Communities Surmount Profound Problems. Minnesota Medicine, 75(7), 14.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2257.   Morisset, J. (1992). Paroles de Québécois traduites du tchippewayan et autres dialectiques
géographiques. Recherches Amérindiennes Au Québec [Montreal], 22(2-3), 117-122.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

2258.   . (1979). W. J. Morrell, & P. T. HoulihanReminiscences of William J. Morrell, Leach Lake band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22891922

2259.   Morris, A. The Treaties of Canada with the Indians of Manitoba & North-West Territories.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

2260.   Morris, G. E. (1993). Gifted woman light around you: Ojibwa women and their stories (Volumes I and II) (life stories, women's health, Native Americans, spiritual relationships). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: This is a study of the health of the Ojibwa people over a period of about 150 years. 'Health' is used as meaning 'A state of physical, mental, social (and spiritual) well-being, not just the absence of disease,' based on the definition adopted by the World Health Organization. Part 1 describes the family life, the nature of social interactions and spiritual relationships of the south-western Ojibwa before they were confined to reservations. At that time the source of their health was the strength received from the spirit beings, which in turn made them able to fully use their own gifts. Access to this strength was different for men and for women, with women receiving much of their strength through their potential power to bear children. Part 2 describes Ojibwa family life, social interactions and spiritual relationships in Minnesota in the early 1980s. At that time the data shows that many Ojibwa people were not healthy. It appeared, however, that women were in a better state of health than were men. Some of the methods by which Indian people were restoring their people to health are described. Parts 1 and 2 provide the context essential for a full understanding of the core of the study--Part 3, which contains stories of the lives of 9 Ojibwa women who were engaged or had been engaged in delivering health care to Indian people. These life histories were told to the author in 1986 and are presented in their own words. Part 4 discusses some lessons which can be learned from the women's lives. These include the importance of belonging and the problems of being different; the sources of support upon which the women relied for their strength; and the role of the women as healers, as leaders and as workers to achieve change. The study concludes that the women were living their lives in a way which was similar to that of the Ojibwa before they were confined to reservations, in that their health was derived from the use of their own gifts and from strength received from outside sources, both from other people and from spiritual sources.

2261.   Morris, J. S. (1992). Modern Chippewa Woman Warrior. Winds of Change : a Magazine for American Indians, 7(4), 38.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

2262.   Morrison, J. G. (Never a dull moment). (1974). C. VandersluisMainly logging : a compilation...   Minneota, MN: Minneota Clinic.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"Index of lumber camps referred to this volume" and "correctio s and additions": [6] p. inserted. Includes  bibliographies and index. Bourgeois, E. J. Thoughts while strolling.--Morrison, J. G., Jr. Never a dull moment.--Wight, C. L. Reminiscences of a cruiser.

2263.   Morrison, W., 1785-1866. (1872). Who discovered Itasca Lake? ; letter of Wm. Morrison, an early Indian trader. Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, 1([343]-344).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11674242. Introduced by a letter from the author's brother, Allan Morrison

2264.   Morse, W. F. (1912). The Indian campaign in Minnesota in 1862. Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. New York Commandery. Personal recollections of the war of the rebellion .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26153096

 

 

 

 

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