Ojibwe Bibliography – part 1

[01-19-04]

 

      1.   (1975). 1790-1890 Federal Population Censuses on Microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      2.   (1978). 1900 Federal Population Census on Microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      3.   (1983). 1910 Federal Population Census on Microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      4.   1936 Area Office Report. (, Ojibwe News/Native American Press Archives.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      5.   (<1968). [audiotape].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "The story of the discovery and significance of the 'Minnesota Man'."

      6.   . (1889). 51st Congress, 1st Session, House of Representatives, Ex. Doc. No. 247, Chippewa Indians in Minnesota.  Message from the President of the United States Transmitting A Communication from the Secretary of the Interior relative to the Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota .  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      7.   85th Congress, 2nd Session, House of Representatives Report No. 2489, to accompany S.2922. Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

      8.   About Spearship Walleyes. (1990). Wisconsin Natural Resources, 14(3), 33.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Answers to commonly asked questions about Chippewa spearfishing and fisheries resources.

      9.   An Act for the relief and civilization of the Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota (25 U.S. Stat. 612)Chapter 24, U.S. Statutes at Large Vol. 25 (p. 542).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     10.   Act of June 14, 1934, Chapter 576United States Code, lawyer's annotated edition .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     11.   Act Providing for the Opening of the Fort Assinniboire Military Reservation, Pub. L.  Vol. No. 261, 739 .  United States.
Notes: Source: cited by Cosens, Barbara A.  (Winter 1998:footnote 7)

     12.   Act to Add Certain Public Domain Land in Montana to the Rocky Boy Indian Reservation, Pub. L. No. 55 Vol. 49, 217, 218.  United States.
Notes: Source: cited by Cosens, Barbara A.  (Winter 1998:footnote 81)

     13.   Act to Establish a Reservation for Certain Indians in the Territory of Montana. (1874).  Vol. 18, part III, Stat. 28.  United States.
Notes: Source: cited by Cosens, Barbara A.  (Winter 1998:footnote 72)

     14.   (1973).  St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0006]

     15.   The agony of Ojibwa Indian band drinking itself to death. (1979 October). Globe and Mail, p. 9.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0007]

     16.   Alexander Henry. [audio tape].  Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0010]

     17.   ALL NIGHT, EVERY NIGHT: The noise is deafening at Casino Rama.(at Ojibwa reserve in Canada). (1998). Maclean's, 111(19), 50 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: On April 7, Maclean's Associate Editor Stephanie Nolen took the late-night bus from Toronto to Casino Rama, 155 km to the north on the Ojibwa native reserve. Her report on the year-round, 24-hour casino:
The streets of downtown Toronto are largely deserted when John pulls his bus out of the station. There are just a few passengers onboard his regular 10 p.m. run. John makes this trip every night of the week, dropping passengers in Barrie and Orillia, and, last stop, Casino Rama. This is a special bus, the free bus: for gamblers bound for Rama, the casino pays the $9.95 fare. John has his regulars, like the grubby old man who sits mute in the front seat, and the blond woman in the back row. "She takes this bus every night," John confides quietly, his voice rounded by a strong Scottish accent. "I think she may have a bit of a problem."
The casino looms suddenly out of the night like an enormous Wal-Mart, tarted up with winking white lights and covered in garish murals of native art. Well after midnight, the huge parking lot is still half full. John pulls the bus into one of the dozen bays in the back. An energetic young man leaps on and asks: "You playing?" Before I can answer, he shoves a voucher for $15 worth of free food in my hand. John points out where to catch the free bus back to Toronto, at 5:30 a.m. "Gets you back to Toronto just in time for work!" the fellow with the vouchers reminds us.
 Inside, a bright young woman called Stephanie, a "host" on the graveyard shift, opens the glass doors into the cavernous casino. It is dark and smoky, and the noise is deafening: hundreds of slot machines, whirring and pinging and beeping, the chink of quarters falling into the metal tray in front of a lucky winner, the "last bets" bellows from the roulette tables. It will be hours before I realize that, while the tables are jammed and the noise is pervasive, almost no one is talking. There are no clocks and no windows. It might be noon.
Colleen, 23, has arrived on John's bus. Until two weeks ago, she worked as a blackjack dealer in a Toronto charity casino called Sunshine, making about $11 an hour, including tips. Now, she has applied for employment insurance, having been laid off while the provincial government finalizes plans for permanent charity casinos. "I've never gone to a casino by myself so I'm sorta nervous," Colleen says, striding purposefully towards the blackjack tables. An hour later, armed with $260 withdrawn from a handy Bank of Nova Scotia automatic teller at the edge of the green baize card tables, she is breaking even, constantly clicking her red $5 chips into little piles while she keeps her eyes on the dealer. "The pop is free," she whispers, gesturing to a glass of ginger ale. "See that guy at the end of the table? He's lost $500 since we got here."
 The man who is losing is Chinese. Stephanie says that Asian-Canadians from Toronto comprise at least half of Rama's clientele. She points out the Willow restaurant, where they serve "real Chinese food" and Asian patrons are tucking into black cod. The casino also has a staff of Asian hosts and dealers who cater to those clients. "They know the etiquette and the superstitions and stuff," Stephanie explains. In the roped-off high-rollers room, where $100 bills sit in casual stacks, all the players are Asian. There is a lot of laughter around a high-stakes game of baccarat.
 Back in the main casino, deep in the maze of slot machines, the scene is very different. Gamblers in cardigans and sweat suits slump in front of whirring machines, feeding in coins, sometimes straddling a chair to play two machines at once. Millie Hadley, 66, is playing the 25-cent slots. She comes a few nights a week. "I can't sleep at night since my husband died a year ago," explains Millie, who lives an hour away in Lindsay. She has won about $4,000 in recent weeks, but is unsure how much she spent to win it. "I guess I should keep track. I'm sure I lose more than I win."
 Has Stephanie heard any horror stories, or seen regular clients become addicted? "We're in the entertainment business," she responds firmly. "We're not here to drain people's pockets." Then she mentions that a few patrons have had themselves legally barred from the casino-if they cannot manage to stay away, they are forcibly removed by police officers who patrol the gaming floor or by casino security. "Things like that, and when I see people losing every night and I know they don't have the money-then it's sort of sad," Stephanie says.
 Just as Millie is showing her lucky stuffed pig, two burly casino security guards equipped with walkie-talkies appear beside us. They are polite but furious that I am talking to patrons unaccompanied by Rama public relations staff, and they demand that I stop. In a gesture of goodwill, they offer to let me keep my notebook before ejecting me. Outside, it is nearly dawn. The elegant female hostess of a Tai Pan Vacation tour bus kindly squeezes me into the last empty seat amid boisterous gamblers. Most of them doze off, waking in the semi-darkness at a succession of suburban Toronto malls, and getting into the BMWs and Saabs they have left parked there. "Next week," one man calls to the guide as he gets in his car. "Oh, every night," she replies quietly. All night, every night, at Casino Rama.
Full Text COPYRIGHT 1998 Maclean Hunter (Canada)

     18.   (<1968). [audiotape].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Some reference to the Indians of this area.  Gives a good description of the wilderness in which the early Chippewa lived."

     19.   Amendment to Article 5 of the 'Constitution of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians". (1918).
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     20.   American Indian centers review . (1969). Minneapolis, Minn.  American Indian Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19602206. Title from cover. Includes bibliography.

     21.   American Indian Frontier Art. (1994). Michigan History, 78(3), 10.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: The striking combination of color, design and material of the Detroit Institute of Arts's Chandler-Pohrt collection of Native American art reveals the bold innovation and spirited indomitability of America's Indian cultures.

     22.   (1979).
Notes: ERIC NO: ED173007
Abstract: Passed by the Minnesota legislature in 1977, the innovative American Indian Language and Culture Education Act provided for the establishment of American Indian language and culture education programs designed (1) to make the curriculum more relevant to the needs, interest, and cultural heritage of American Indian pupils, (2) to provide positive reinforcement of the self-image of American Indian pupils, and (3) to develop intercultural awareness among pupils, parents and staff. Major provisions implemented were a statewide needs assessment, development of an Indian language teacher licensing process and employment guidelines, and creation of a statewide advisory task force on American Indian Language and Culture Education. Appropriations totaling $600,000 funded 11 pilot projects. Seven of these projects focused on Ojibwe, Dakota, and Winnebago cultural, language, and art development programs. Several projects provided pre-school programs to develop sensory-motor and early reading skills as well as cultural awareness. Publication of Ojibwe story books for use in grades pre-school through 6 and a Red Lake junior and senior high history book resulted from another project. A camp experience project exposed students to traditional Ojibwe life styles. Appendices contain the 1977 Act, a list of the advisory task force on American Indian Language and Culture Education, and the geographic locations of the 11 pilot projects. (NEC)

     23.   (1916-1920). The American Indian Magazine (Vols. Vol. 4, no. 1 (Jan.-Mar. 1916)-v. 7, no. 4 (Aug. 1920). ). Cooperstown, NY//Washington: Society of American Indians.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Cover title. Microfiche. [New York] : Clearwater, 1981. 13 microfiche sheets ; 11 x 15 cm. (The Library of American Indian affairs)
Cover title. Microfiche. [New York] : Clearwater, 1981. 13 microfiche sheets ; 11 x 15 cm. (The Library of American Indian affairs)

     24.   [record].  Wichita, KS: Learning Arts.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0012]

     25.   (1968). American Indian oral history project records.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23290461, accession: 28409766
Abstract: Writings, taped interveiws, and transcripts, relating to various aspects of American Indian history and culture, particularly to Red Lake Indian Reservation and Objibwa (Chippewa) Indians of central Minnesota. Subjects include agriculture, child rearing, medicine, religion, and treaties.

     26.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Survey of Indian life before the coming of the white man.  Deals with many areas of life and with various tribes."

     27.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "This film tells of the achievements and problems of American Indians in a variety of situations.  It also analyzes current trends that are shaping the future of the American Indians."

     28.   (1967). The Amerindian, 15 (4), 5.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:56)

     29.   [database].  Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     30.   Anishinabe. (1980). Tallahassee, Florida : University Presses of Florida.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

     31.   (9999). Annual Report for Indian Foster Care Contract (Account #5164) Year Ending June 30, ... (Vols. Description based on : 1974; title from cover). [St. Paul, Minn.] : Bureau of Support Services, Research and Statistics.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12598005. Alt Title: Annual report cost of providing care for Indian children under the federal contract for fiscal year ending June 30, ...  Other: Minnesota. Bureau of Support Services. Research and Statistics.

     32.   Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the Legislature of Minnesota, Session of 1864. (1863).  by authority, Minnesota Adjutant General's Office.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     33.   [record]. New York: Folkways Records.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0018]

     34.   [Anthropology-general]. (1898). Washington, D.C.  Smithsonian Institution.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Title supplied by cataloging agency. Past progress and present position / E.W. Brabrook -- Origin of African civilizations / L. Frobenius -- Anthropology in the last twenty years / Rudolph Virchow -- Work, department prehistoric anthropology / Thomas Wilson -- Redistribution of mankind / H.N. Dickson-- Earliest forms of human habitation / M. Holes -- Am. archology and human history / W.H. Holmes -- Antiquity of the red race in Am. / Thomas Wilson -- Advent of man in America / Armand de Quakefages -- Primitive industry / Thomas Wilson -- N. Am. archaeology / John Lubbock -- Was primitive man a modern savage / Talcott Williams -- Most ancient skeletal remains of man / A. Hrdlicka -- Antiquity of man in Europe / George Grant MacCurdy -- Study of high antiquity / A. Morlot -- Lacushian cities of Switzerland / Frederic Troyon -- Lacushian settlements / Dr. Keller -- Palafittes or Lacushian constructions of the lake of Neuchatel / E. Desor -- Quaternary human remains in Central Europe / Hugues Obermaier -- Man a contemporary of the mammoth / C.A. Alexander -- Geological change and time / Arch. Geike -- Past and future of geology / Joseph Prestwick - - Revolutions of the crust of the Earth / George Pilar.

     35.   Article VI of the U.S. Congress Act of February 20, 1904.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"this article provided for separation of what were called Red Lake assets from those claimed by the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe"

     36.   . (1895). [Articles on Minnesota's northern boundary]. 
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: International boundary between Lake Superior and the Lake of the Woods / by U. S. Grant -- The settlement and development of the Red River Valley / by W. Upham -- The discovery and development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N. H. Winchell.

     37.   Basic criminal law. (1975). [Washington] : National American Indian Court Judges Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

     38.   Beaulieu Genealogy. (White Earth Land Settlement Act Genealogy.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     39.   The Beaver people : a case study in traditional northern Native teaching and learning practices. (1980). Lethbridge, Alta.: Four Worlds Development Project.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

     40.   (Beltrami County Tax Records.  Beltrami County Courthouse, Bemidji, MN 56601.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     41.   (1896). The Bemidji Pioneer [Bemidji Herald Bemidji Weekly Pioneer (OCoLC) 32533032].
Notes: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 7 (Apr. 30, 1896). With v. 20:52-v. 22:40 (Jan. 6, 1916-Aug. 23, 1917) is filmed:  Bemidji weekly pioneer, v. 22:41-v. 23:20 (Aug. 30, 1917-May 27, 1920). Microfilm. St. Paul : Minnesota Historical Society, 19-- microfilm reels : positive ; 35 mm.

     42.   (1917).  Bemidji Weekly Pioneer [Bemidji Pioneer (OCoLC) 32532946].
Notes: Vol. 22:41-v.23:20 (Aug. 30, 1917-May 27, 1920) filmed with: Bemidji pioneer, v.20:52-v.22:40 (Jan. 6, 1916-Aug. 23, 1917) Microfilm. Wooster, Ohio : Bell & Howell Co., 19-- microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

     43.   The Best Interests of Indian Children in Minnesota. (1992). American Indian Law Review, 17(1), 237.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

     44.   Bolstering a case. (Indian Claims Commission recommends  compensations for Chippewa in Ontario's Ipperwash area). (1997). Maclean's, 110(12), 23(1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: The Indian Claims Commission, a federal advisory body, issued a nonbinding recommendation that Ottawa should compensate the Chippewa in Ontario's Ipper- wash area on Lake Huron. The commission said that natives had been cheated in their original 1927 surrender of 33 hectares of land. The Kettle and Stony Point First Nations say they will continue with a $36-million lawsuit against the federal government unless the matter is settled. Ipperwash has been the focus of numerous conflicts-in 1995, a native was killed outside the local provincial park during a protest over a sacred burial ground.
Full Text COPYRIGHT 1997 Maclean Hunter (Canada)

     45.   Border Crossing. (1992). Turtle Quarterly, 4(4), 36.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: In a routine too often played out around the world, the Lac La Croix Ojibwa are struggling to maintain their way of life. While they have lived off the land for thousands of years, they must now prove to lawmakers that they are not a threat to the natural balance of life on their own land.

     46.   Brief presented to the Task Force on  Canadian Unity . ( 1978). Caughnawaga, Que.  Task Force on Canadian Unity.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), Cataloguer's title.

     47.   (1988). [Audiovisual].  Minneapolis, MN : BIHA Women in Action.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25732137
Abstract: Title on guide: Broken promises: family violence in communities of color. [Tape 1.] Family violence within the Black community -- [Tape 2.] Family violence within the Native American community -- [Tape 3.] Family violence within the Hispanic community. The videotapes present a series of interviews on the subject of family violence and battering against women of color. Provides insights and alternatives for men and women who find themselves in violent relationships.

     48.   (1997). [Moving Image or Slide/Transparency]. Milwaukee Public Museum, Inc.
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 98508309

     49.   Bureau of Indian Affairs File number 9706, Red Lake 066. (1936). Bureau of Indian Affairs Central Classified Files.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     50.   Cars ... and now casinos. (three casino complexes planned for Detroit)(. (1998). Building Design & Construction, 39(2), 11-12.
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Cars...and now casinos. Two Las Vegas-based gaming companies and an Indian tribe are principals in development teams selected by Mayor Dennis Archer to construct three casino complexes in Detroit. They are Circus Circus Enterprises, MGM Grand and the Sault Ste. Marie tribe of Chippewa Indians. Each proposal includes a hotel component, and a total cost that ranges from $519 million to $700 million. It may be up to three years before the projects are completed. The next steps are for Archer to negotiate agreements with each group and for the City Council to approve them. One complex will be downtown, another in Greektown and a third north of downtown.

     51.   Caughnawaga. (1990).
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: Collection of holographs, typescripts and  printed copy. Dictionnaire genealogique des familles iroquoises  de Caughnawaga / par G. Forbes Tehonikonhiathy -- Copie d'un  vieux manuscrit trouve a la biblioteque du Sault S.  Louis -- Education de la jeunesse, Province de Quebec,  1789 -- Texte de grammaire iroquoise -- Plans Caughnawaga par  Franquet 1752 et 1965 -- Histoire des Iroquois du Sault St.  Louis / par R.P. Burtin -- Historical sketches / by G.M.  Matheson -- Cantiques Indiens.

     52.   (1905). The Caughnawaga Gazette Journal of the Iroquois Reserves Caughnawaga.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

     53.   : Precision Indexing, Bountiful, UT 84011.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     54.   Cherokee Nation v. Georgia. (1831).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     55.   The Chippewa Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 37035873

     56.   Chippewa Agency Letters Received, 1880; Chippewa Agency Emigration 1850-59 and Reserves 1853-55. (Microfilm Series 234. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     57.   Chippewa and Dakota Indians: a subject catalog of books, pamphlets, periodical articles and manuscripts in the Minnesota Historical Society. (1969). St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVI (1972:7)

     58.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Good look at some of the handiwork of the Chippewa."

     59.   . (1974). Chippewa Indians  Vol. I-VII). New York: Garland.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXI (1978:171)
Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 74002289

     60.   Chippewa music of American IndianimeÀe˜. (1992). Chung-Kuo Yin Yueh = China Music, (3), 47.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: TEXT IN CHINESE

     61.   Chippewa, Statement Made by the Indians . (1988). Ontario: University of Western
Ontario, Center for Research and Teaching of Canadian Native Languages.
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

     62.   The Chippewa Versus RTZ. Also: Hoopas great help; Mabo ruling rocks Australia; Indian rights violated in Brazil. (1993). Earth Island Journal, 8(3), 32.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

     63.   (1902 January). The Chippeway Herald.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     64.   Chippeway Indian language. (1924). Archive/Manuscript Control.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

     65.   (197u). The Circle : News From an American Indian Perspective Minneapolis, Minn.: Minneapolis Regional Native American Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 3175584. Description based on: Feb. 1978; title from caption. Alt Title: The Circle (Minneapolis, Minn.) Circle (Minneapolis, Minn.)  Other: Minneapolis Regional Native American Center. Minneapolis American Indian Center.

     66.   (1974). Class E, miscellaneous monographs & pamphlets Microform shelf numbers 56627-56690. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26824653
Abstract: Contains 64 items; full contents listed at beginning of reel. Flatboating on the Yellowstone, 1877 -- Fighting the Mill Creeks -- The dangers and sufferings of Robert Eastburn, and his deliverance from Indian captivity --Sketches of the life and Indian adventures of Captain Samuel Brady -- Sitting Bull- Custer --Sketches, historical and descriptive, of the monuments and tablets erected by the Minnesota Valley Hisitorical Society in Renville and Redwood Counties, Minnesota -- A narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How in 1745-1747.
Other: Bond, Fred G., b. 1852. Flatboating on the Yellowstone, 1877. 1974. Anderson, Robert A. (Robert Allen), b. 1840. Fighting the Mill Creeks. 1974. Eastburn, Robert, 1710-1778. Dangers and sufferings of Robert Eastburn, and his deliverance from Indian captivity. 1974. Beede, A. McG. (Aaron McGaffey), 1859-1934. Sitting Bull- Custer. 1974. How, Nehemiah, 1693-1747. Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How in 1745-1747. 1974. Sketches of the life and Indian adventures of Captain Samuel Brady. 1974. Sketches, historical and descriptive, of the monuments and tablets erected by the Minnesota Valley Hisitorical Society in Renville and Redwood Counties, Minnesota. 1974.

     67.   A collection of Chippeway and English hymns, for the use of the native Indians. (1854). New York: Carlton & Phillips.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

     68.   Collection of telephone directories for cities in Beltrami County, Minnesota. (1954).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 27296138.  For a listing of the volumes in the MHS Research Center and their call numbers see: Telephone directories in the Minnesota Historical Society (READING ROOM F 601 .T45).

     69.   Compacts between state of Wisconsin and Indian tribes. (1993). Madison, Wis.  Wisconsin Gaming Commission.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28012051
Abstract: Cover title. Contains gambling compacts of 1991 and 1992. Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians -- Forest Country Potowatomi Community of Wisconsin -- Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians -- Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians -- Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin -- Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin -- Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians -- Sokaogon Chippewa Community (Mole Lake) -- Saint Croix Chippewa of Wisconsin -- Stockbridge-Munsee Community -- Wisconsin Winnebago Tribe

     70.   Compendium of history and biography of northern Minnesota : containing a history of the State of Minnesota : embracing an account of early explorations, early settlement, Indian occupancy, Indian history and traditions ... : also a compendium of biography of northern Minnesota. (1902). Chicago: Geo. A. Ogle & Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4214489

     71.   Confessions of an Ojibwe Storyteller: "Keepers of the Water". (1999). Legacy, 10(2), 40.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

     72.   Confessions of an Ojibwe Storyteller: "Pragmatism as a Source of Understanding". (1998). Legacy, 9(4), 36.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

     73.   (1989). [Audiovisual].  Cass Lake, Minn.  Indian Education Program, Independent School District #115.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24640713. Other: Ebbott, Elizabeth. Indians in Minnesota. Brill, Charles. Indian and free. Indian Education Program (Cass Lake, Minn.)
Abstract: Folder includes course outline, articles, worksheets, notes, quizzes and tests. Books and booklets: Indians in Minnesota / Elizabeth Ebbott -- Indian and free / Charles Brill -- Fur trade -- Unlearning Indian stereotypes -- Leech Lake Reservation -- An American Indian curriculum resource directory. System requirements: Apple II.

     74.   (1989). Cousins Et Cousines, a Newsletter for Members of the Northwest Territory Canadian and French Heritage Center, a Section of the Minnesota Genealogical Society, 12(4), 470.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     75.   Criminal court procedures manual; a guide for American Indian Court judges. (1971). Washington: National American Indian Court Judges Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

     76.   Curious schools. (1881). Boston: D. Lothrop & company.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23316130 ... accession: 4774192
Abstract: Cadet life at West Point.--Perkins institution and Massachusetts school for the blind.--Boston whittling schools.--Philadelphia school of reform.--About some sewing schools.--A Chinese mission school.--The flower school at Corlear's Hook.--Lady Betty's cooking school.--The bad boys of France.--The children's hour; a novel art school.- -At a day nursery.--Some Indian schools.--The training school- ship "Minnesota."

     77.   Daycare 6: First Nations gathering. (1996). Canadian Architect, 41(5), 33.
Notes: Source: U of M architecture bibliographic database (October, 1999 search).  Architects: Katz Webster Clancey Associates.

     78.   "Declaration of Independence". (published in World Scope Encyclopedia, Universal Educational Guild, 1950, vol. XI.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     79.   The Department of the Interior's Denial of the Wisconsin Chippewa's Casino Applications: Hearings Before the Committee on Government Reform & Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, January 21, 22, 28 & 29, 1998. (1998).  United States Government Printing Office.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

     80.   Developing documentation: the Sherman collection. (1976). Musée National De L'Homme Collection Mercure.  Division De L'Histoire.  Dossier, 15, 40-42.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXIII (1981:38)

     81.   Directory of Minnesota Indian owned businesses. (1990). Cass Lake, Minn.  Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Indian Business Development Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23597219.  "Summer of 1990"--Cover. Contributing directory sponsor: Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce, St. Paul, Minn.  Other: Minnesota Chippewa Tribe. Indian Business Development Center. Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce.

     82.   (<1968). [audiotape].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Some reference to the Indians in Minnesota in the discussion of the history of our state."

     83.   (1989).
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997).

     84.   (1991).  [Recording]. [Royal Oak, Mich.?] : Blue Yonder Audio.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 34021313.  Alt Title: Dream catchers, volume 1 Dream catchers
Abstract: Compact disc. "All proceeds from the sale of this CD go to the Chippewa Bay Mills Indian Community of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan"--Insert. Program notes on container insert. Produced by Chris Staels. Various performers. Larceny by trick / Richard Cyr -- Ojibwe child / Barb Barton with Hideko J. Mills -- Beyond the hills / The Hope Orchestra -- The decent unbeliever / John D. Lamb -- And you / Dropping Names -- I needed this / Red C. -- Willow / Barb Barton with Hideko J. Mills -- Inheritance / The Pedestrians -- Siren's tune / Billy Brandt -- Politics of mind / The Hope Orchestra - - Another day / Spiral Dance -- Waykool rock'n'roll / The Waykools -- I know why / The Lovekings -- No / Cafe Zero -- Christmas cove / Deep Blue Lake.

     85.   Duluth, Red Wing and Southern Railroad from the rich mines on Lake Superior and the great lake port of Duluth, through the belts of timber, to the grain, stock and dairy regions of Minnesota and Iowa : a region unsurpassed by the variety and quantity of its products by any country in the world [Exhibit of the Duluth, Red Wing and Southern Railroad]. (1887). Red Wing : Red Wing Printing Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25585775.  Cover title: Exhibit of the Duluth, Red Wing and Southern Railroad.

     86.   [Audiovisual].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Abstract: Information on paintings can be found in John Francis McDermott's, Seth Eastman's Mississippi, a Lost Portfolio Recovered. 1. Old Fort Mackinac -- 2. St. Paul, Minnesota -- 3. Prairie back of Fort Snelling -- 4. Fort Snelling -- 5. Distant view of Fort Snelling -- 6. Maiden's Leap; Lake Pepin -- 7. Winona's Rock -- 8. Fort Snelling -- 9. Valley of St. Peter's -- 10. Prairie du Chien -- 11. Above St. Louis -- 12. Little Crow's Village -- 13. Medicine Bottle's Village -- 14. Fort Armstrong -- 15. Indian Graves -- 16. Red Wing's Village -- 17. Residence of the Sioux -- 18. Indian Battle Scene; scalping -- 19. Dog dance of Sioux -- 20. Indians killing fish -- 21. Prairie at Montrose -- 22. Wabasha Village at Wabasha Prairie -- 23. Hill near Red Wing's village -- 24. Above Prairie du Chien -- 25. Above St. Louis -- 26. On the Mississippi -- 27. Below the Falls of St. Anthony -- 28. Buffalo hunt -- 29. Indian burial place -- 30. Bluff at Wabasha's Prairie -- 31. View of Mississippi River -- 32. View of Mississippi River looking northwest -- 33. Pilot Knob -- 34. St. Peter's River -- 35. Lacrosse playing among Sioux.

     87.   Ecological knowledge and environmental problem-solving : concepts and case studies . (1986). Washington, DC : National Academy Press.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13124638
Abstract: Includes bibliographies and index. Individuals and single populations -- Population interactions -- Community ecology -- Materials and energy -- Scales in space and time -- Analog, generic, and pilot studies and treatment of a project as an experiment -- Indicator species and biological monitoring -- Dealing with uncertainty -- The special problem of cumulative effects -- A scientific framework for environmental problem-solving -- References -- North Pacific halibut fishery management / David Policansky -- Vampire bat control in Latin America / G. Clay Mitchell -- Biological control of California red scale / Robert F. Luck -- Experimental control of malaria in West Africa / Robert M. May -- Protecting caribou during hydroelectric development in Newfoundland / David J. Kiell, Edward L. Hill, and Shane P. Mahoney -- Conserving a regional spotted owl population / Hal Salwasser -- Restoring derelict lands in Great Britain / Peter Wathern -- Optimizing timber yields in New Brunswick forests / Thom A. Erdle and Gordon L. Baskerville -- Control of eutrophication in Lake Washington : Raising the level of a subarctic lake / John T. Lehman -- Ecological effects of nuclear radiation : Ecological effects of forest clearcutting / Carl F. Jordan -- Environmental effects of DDT / John Buckley.

     88.   Eliza, the Chippeway Indian. (1830). New York : American Tract Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Caption title. At head of title: No. 293.

     89.   . (1948). The Encylopedia Americana Vol. 18 (p. 466).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     90.   . (1938).  (Intertribal Chippewa Band, Inc.), Enrolled members of Minnesota Chippewa Indians photostatic copy of book handmade for Floyd Sweet, Treasurer ed., ).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     91.   Entry 30, Item #65, Drawer #4, Northwest Commission, Irregular Shaped Papers. (Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Record Group 75.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     92.   Entry 30, Item #65, Northwest Commission, Irregular Shaped papers, letter #62. (Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Record Group #75.  National Archives, Washington, D.D.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     93.   ERIC. (about 1988).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     94.   . (1975). Evaluation report of Indian Education Administrator Training Program at universities of Harvard, Penn State, and Minnesota : descriptive analysis . Albuquerque, N.M.  Indian Education Resources Center, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Division of Evaluation, Research, and Development.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18160094

     95.   Executive Document no. 193, House of Representatives, 42nd Congress, second session, Chippewa Half-Breeds of Lake Superior.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     96.   Executive documents of the state of Minnesota for the fiscal year ending July 31, 1890. (1891). Minneapolis : Harrison & Smith .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7623204
Abstract: v. 1. Biennial message of Governor Wm. R. Merriam, Jan. 14, 1891. p. [33]-50 -- History of Minnesota troops: Report of Board of Commissioners [on Civil and Indian Wars]. p. [51]-58. (no title page) -- Annual report of Secretary of State, July 31, 1890. p. [65]-192 -- Annual report of State Treasurer, July 31, 1890. p. [193]-273 -- Report of Auditor of State, July 31, 1890. p. [289]-676 -- 6th biennial report of Minnesota Historical Society [1889- 90]. p. [677]-738 -- 9th report (4th biennial) of Public Examiner, July 31, 1890. p. [741]-888 -- 22nd annual report of Commissioner of Statistics, 1890. p. [889]-1016 -- Annual report of Minnesota State Agricultural Society, 1890. p. [1017]-1138 -- v. 2. 3d biennial report of State Dairy and Food Commissioner, Jan. 1, 1890. p. [17]-368 -- 6th biennial report of Board of Regents of University of Minnesota, July 31, 1890. p. [369]-435 -- 6th biennial report of State Normal School Board, July 31, 1890. p. [437]-544 -- 18th, being 6th biennial, report of Minnesota State Reform School, July 31, 1890. p. [545]-560 6th biennial report of Superintendent of Public Instruction, July 31, 1890. p. [577]-852 -- 2d biennial report [on] vital statistics, 1888-1889. p. [853]-988 -- Biennial report of State Agricultural Experiment Station. Dec., 1890. p. [989]- 1027 -- 16th and 17th reports of Minnesota Commission of Fisheries, July 31, 1890. p. [1029]-1052 -- v.3. 2d biennial report of Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1889-90. p. [17]-393 -- 3d biennial report of Railroad and Warehouse Commission, 1890. p. [395]-1100 -- v.4. 6th biennial report of Minnesota hospitals for insane, July 31, 1890. p. [17]-167 -- Biennial report of State Librarian, July 31, 1890. p. [169]-191 -- Biennial report of Attorney General, July 31, 1890. p. [193]- 263 -- 6th biennial report of Minnesota Institute for Defectives, July 31, 1890. p. [265]-374 -- 2d annual report of Minnesota State Reformatory, 1890. p. [377]-418 -- 6th biennial report of inspectors and warden of State Prison, July 31, 1890. p. [419]-459 3d biennial report of Minnesota State Public School [Board], July 31, 1890. p. [461]-539 -- 3d annual report of Minnesota Soldiers' Home, July 31, 1890. p. [541]-599 -- 4th biennial report of State Board of Corrections and Charities, July 31, 1890. p. [601]-876 -- 20th annual report of Insurance Commissioner, 1891. p. [877]-1312.

     97.   Final reflections on the life of Wub-e-ke-niew. (1997). Native American Press/Ojibwe News.
Abstract: Wub-e-ke-niew of the Bear Dodem died Thursday, October 16, at home with his Ahnishinahbæótjibway land which, as he said, “has been in my family for hundreds of millennia.”
Wub-e-ke-niew’s patrilineal great-grandfather was Bah-se-nos of the Bear Dodem, who lived with his wife Nay-bah-nay-cumig-oke in a birchbark longhouse at Be-kwa-kwan, part of the Ahnishinahbæótjibway land of the Bear Dodem.  His grandparents were Bah-wah-we-nind, also of the Bear Dodem, and Ke-niew-e-gwon-ay-beak of Leech Lake.  Wub-e-ke-niew was born in Bah-wah-we-nind’s log house, also at Be-kwa-kwan, about June 6, 1928.  His parents were Bah-wah-we-nind’s son Wub-e-ke-niew, and Delia Lufkins of White Earth.  Wub-e-ke-niew explained that his father was “given the name Francis Blake in order to impose an artificial Indian identity on him,” and often added that, “my Indian name is Francis Blake, Junior.”
Wub-e-ke-niew spent most of his “formative years” with his grandfather Bah-wah-we-nind.  After Bah-wah-we-nind’s death in 1935, Wub-e-ke-niew “spent nine years as a political prisoner” in the Catholic boarding school at St. Mary’s Mission, Red Lake.  Then, he worked for two years as a part of the migrant labor force in the Red River Valley.  In 1946, he joined the United States Army, and after schooling in the Military Police Academy, served with the 28th Constabulary in Germany.  Wub-e-ke-niew wrote of his military service, “I didn’t even realize that I was not a U.S. citizen.  Indians were made U.S. citizens in 1924, but in 1946 I hadn’t learned enough English to figure out that I’m not an Indian.  I enlisted, rather than waiting to be conscripted, because I figured that if I had to go, I might as well get it over with on my own terms.”
Wub-e-ke-niew worked after the war in Great Falls, Montana and in Seattle, and then moved to Minneapolis, where he married Norby Fairbanks of White Earth in September, 1953.  In the 1950’s and early 1960’s, he worked in industrial labor, as a handyman, truck driver, and for J.D. Holtzerman of Minneapolis.  In 1963 he was a Teamsters Union 544 driver for Custom Cartage in Minneapolis, and he drove truck until 1970.  He wrote, “I was teaching myself to read during the time that I was parked at the docks waiting for a load, or waiting for my turn to unload the truck.  Sometimes I would spend half a day waiting at the dock, and so I kept an assortment of magazines and books and a dictionary with me in the truck.  Whenever I got to a word I didn’t know, I would look it up in the dictionary, and then write it down.  I have always spent time observing people: their dialect, their accent, how they used their words and their body-language, what they said and what they meant.  The English language and the Euro-American culture are still foreign to me—although I understand the immigrant peoples fairly well by now, I’m still astounded by some of the things that they think and do.
In 1965, Wub-e-ke-niew was part of the alcohol self-help group which started the American Indian Movement.  From 1971 to 1973, he served as the Treasurer of AIM.  He wrote, “The way I initially saw AIM, was that this organization was going to create a vehicle for Aboriginal Indigenous people to take back our identity, and re-empower ourselves and our community.  As I look back on it now, this was a big mistake.”  While Treasurer of AIM, he “managed to get the first American Indian Movement Survival School,” Heart of the Earth Survival School, started in Minneapolis.  After the occupation of Wounded Knee, Wub-e-ke-niew resigned from AIM in June of 1973.  AIM, Wub-e-ke-niew wrote, had an “implicit charter with the White liberal organizations, who wanted to support AIM in working toward social change, but not in actually making structural changes to society.  The kind of Indian leaders the White man supports are professional Indians who talk a fine speech, but who are European subject people.  When it comes to reality, many of these externally-supported community leaders value their job and superficial prestige more than they do their own community, and can be manipulated into stealing from even their own children.  BIA Commissioner John Collier described these Indians as having a ‘white-plus psychology’.”  He continued, Métis people have their own identity, and the capability of realizing themselves as a people in their own right, but they cannot do it from within the Indian identity, because that’s owned by the White man.  I can’t speak for anyone else; it is up to each person to figure out who they are and to chart their own destiny.  The only thing that I will say is that the Indians are not the Aboriginal Indigenous people of this Continent, and that they do neither themselves nor us any good by pretending that they are.”
After he resigned from AIM, Wub-e-ke-niew “devoted more attention to politics, still trying to make positive change from within the system.”  He worked with his family in the Jimmy Carter campaign of 1975, then after the election, went to Kansas City, Missouri.  While there, he worked as an apartment caretaker and as a jack-of-all-trades for an office supply company.  He also helped organize the Longest Walk through Kansas City, and wrote that at that time he “did not know what it was supposed to accomplish,” although he came to “understand why this kind of demonstration, although the participants feel a fleeting moment of release and unity, is inevitably a charade and a waste of energy.”
In 1981, Wub-e-ke-niew returned to the Ahnishinahbæótjibway land of his Bear Dodem, where he spent the remaining sixteen years of his life.  He wrote that he “realized that I needed to become a part of the land again, and regain my roots and my identity.  I was born here, and I will die here.  This is my land, my Ahnishinahbæótjibway philosophy, my spirituality, my place with Grandmother Earth.”  Wub-e-ke-niew married Clara NiiSka by the Ahnishinahbæótjibway tradition, on his land in 1984.
Wub-e-ke-niew drove school bus for several years, then attended Bemidji State University, where he “took a writing class and learned how to write in English.”  In 1985, he began writing Freedom of Information Act letters to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as well as doing political writing protesting the “colonial practice which is applied to Aboriginal Indigenous people; using a foreign infrastructure to separate us form our lands.  The U.S. Government used their Indians to tell me that I was not welcome on my own land, which has never been ceded or sold by my people the Ahnishinahbæótjibway, whose land this is.  As far as I am concerned, the so-called Indian government could leave tomorrow, and take their Indians with them.  I have told the White people on the BIA’s Tribal Council, ‘go play Indian some other place.’ ... The BIA and the Tribal Council are classic examples of racist institutions.  No matter who fills the positions, the structure of the institution compels them to behave in a racist way.”
In 1986, Wub-e-ke-niew was appointed chairman of the Economic Development Committee for the Red Lake Peoples Council.  He wrote, “we spent two years working with one of the top grantwriters in the State of Minnesota,” trying to build community-owned economic development on Red Lake Reservation, but “could not get any foundation funding. ... There seems to be plenty of grant money to study problems, to promote Indians, or to fund institutions which address the symptoms on the surface, but none at all for Aboriginal Indigenous grassroots organizations to address the problems on our own land, at the root causes.”  He also spent several years working on a gardening project.  He wrote, “We focussed on the Ahnishinahbæótjibway tradition of gardens partly because, for anybody, growing one’s own food brings a person back in touch with the land.  Connection to the land is the foundation of a healthy society.  We were also addressing the serious health problems caused by poor diet, and wanted to change the cutting-the-forests-to-buy-supermarket-food economics which the BIA has encouraged.”
After having spent more than two decades “trying to make positive change from within the system,” Wub-e-ke-niew decided to heal the “deformed culture” which the Euroamericans brought to his land by going to the root causes.  He began doing research and writing We Have The Right To Exist, reading archival and historical documents validating what he had “always known but couldn’t prove.”
In December of 1990, Wub-e-ke-niew wrote to the U.S. Secretary of the Interior that, “I will no longer be identified by your racist term of ‘Indian.’  I am not an ‘Indian,’ I am not a ‘Chippewa,’ and I am not a ‘Native American’.”  He explained that, “If I allow myself to continue to be falsely identified as ‘Indian’ I am guilty of complacency and conspiracy; I want to part whatsoever of the fraudulent Indian identity that the United States Government is still using to destroy the legitimate people of these two continents. ... I wipe my hands clean of being identified in the same category as those who are contributing to ongoing genocide, dispossession and destruction of my own Aboriginal Indigenous people and my own Traditional Aboriginal Indigenous culture.  I’m sending my ‘Indian Identity Card’ by certified mail to the Supreme Court.  I am turning it in as a false document issued with felonious and genocidal intent by the United States Government in collusion with their colonial Indian Reorganization Act ‘Tribal Councils.’  I am not an Indian!”  In accordance with provisions of the U.S. Constitution, Wub-e-ke-niew sent his Indian Identity Card to Chief Justice Thurgood Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court, who kept it, and so Wub-e-ke-niew legally regained his own real identity, Ahnishinahbæótjibway of the Bear Dodem.
In 1995, Wub-e-ke-niew’s book, We Have The Right To Exist, was published after nearly ten years of research and writing.  Wub-e-ke-niew wrote columns for the Native American Press/Ojibwe News for many years, and did other writing and public speaking.  He was also studying language, comparing the harmonious male-and-female balance of his egalitarian Ahnishinahbæótjibway language, with the violent hierarchical abstractions of male-dominated languages like English.  He had begun writing two novels.
Wub-e-ke-niew gardened for many years, and maintained his ancient Ahnishinahbæótjibway permacultural tradition, making maple syrup and maple sugar in the sugarbush of his Bear Dodem.  He cut his own firewood, repaired his own vehicles, and led an active life.  In collaboration with Jean Houston and the Mystery School in New York, he was working to establish a radio station as a memorial to the indigenous people who were killed in the genocide of these two continents.
Wub-e-ke-niew was buried on his land Friday by family, joining his ancestors “who are a part of every handful of this Earth.”  His legacy includes the decades of his work “to make this a better world for all human beings.”  Wub-e-ke-niew described himself as, “just an ordinary human being.”

     98.   Final Report of the Business Committee. (1887). Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Lake Mohonk Conference  .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

     99.   Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission, Task Force Three. (1976).  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   100.   Firm, tribe collaborate on casino design. (1995). Hotel & Motel Management, 210(19), 142 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: The Saginaw Chippewa Indian tribe and Minneapolis, MN-based Cunningham Hamilton Quiter collaborated closely in the planning and design of the new Soaring Eagle Destination Resort in Mount Pleasant, MI. This close working relationship has ensured that the new state-of-the-art resort addresses the needs of the tribe.

   101.   . (1958). First revised tribal constitution and bylaws, approved by the Red Lake Constitutional Committee  .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   102.   . (1954). Floods of 1952   . Washington : U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).
Abstract: Includes bibliographies. Floods of September 1952 in the Colorado and Guadalupe River basins, central Texas. Floods of April 1952 in the Missouri River basin. Floods of 1952 in the basins of the upper Mississippi River and Red River of the North. Floods of 1952 in California: Flood of January 1952 in the south San Francisco Bay region; Snowmelt flood of 1952 in Kern River, Tulare Lake, and San Jaoquin River basins. Floods of April- June 1952 in Utah and Nevada. Summary of floods in the United States during 1952

   103.   Focus on the native American : a selected list of resources . (1992). Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Accompanies the kit Native American Languages of Wisconsin.

   104.   Folksongs of Saskatchewan. (1993). Washington, D.C.  Smithsonian Folkways Records.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Abstract: Notes by the editor and texts printed on program notes. Reissue of Folkways Records album no. FE 4312, c1963. Performed by native singers. A hungry fox -- O bury me not -- Barbara Allen -- Johnny Sands -- Henry my son -- The lakes of Pontchartraine -- The 12 days of Christmas -- The orphan girl -- In the Carpathian hills -- The Christmas song -- A song of summer -- Chanson de la Grenouillere -- Chanson de Riel -- A poor lone girl in Saskatchewan -- Flunky Jim -- Saskatchewan -- E.P. Walker -- The civil war -- The backwoodsman -- Salteaux lullaby -- Victory song -- The whipping song -- The grass dance -- The song of worship.  Cass-Beggs, Barbara.

   105.   (1927). Fort Totten, N.D., collection. Archive/Manuscript Control.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 28408583. 
Abstract: Letter and report (1869) of Capt. William J. Twining relating to his reconnaissance of the territory from the Red River to the Mouse (also known as Souris) River; historical sketches; and pamphlets and newspaper clippings, concerning Fort Totten, which was established as a military base near Devils Lake in 1867 and abandoned 1890. Includes information pertaining to Fort Totten Indian Reservation.

   106.   (198u). Four Directions : Newsletter of the St. Paul American Indian Center (Vols. Ceased publication in 1990). St. Paul, Minn.  St. Paul American Indian Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25844114. Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (Jan./Feb. 1989); title from cover.  Alt Title: Four directions (Saint Paul, Minn.).

   107.   Geneva Convention of 1906 .

   108.   Geneva Convention of 1929 .

   109.   Geneva Convention of 1949 .

   110.   Great Lakes legislators want cuts to environmental programs restored. (1990 March). Pioneer.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   111.   Guidelines for Indian health care in Minnesota. (uuuu uuuu). [Minneapolis] .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23737063

   112.   Guiness book of world records. (1992).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   113.   Hague Convention of 1899.

   114.   Hague Convention of 1907.

   115.   Hammond's world atlas. (1960).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
The "Principal Voyages of Discovery," [sic] who we call invaders and illegal aliens, listed by Hammond's World Atlas, 1960 include: SPANISH: Vespucci, 1497-8; Columbus, 1498; Ojeda, 1499; Pinzon, 1499-1500; Columbus, 1502-4; Magellan, 1519-21; Orellana, 1940-41; and Cabrillo and Ferrelo, 1542-43; PORTUGUESE: Pedro Alvarez Cabral, 1500; Gaspar Corte Real, 1501; ENGLISH: John Cabot, 1497; John Cabot, 1498; Sir Francis Drake, 1577-80; FRENCH: Verrazano, 1524; Cartier, 1534 and 1535.  These expeditions circumnavigated both Continents from Newfoundland to Northern California, and wreaked havoc wherever they touched shore.  The first documented Spanish settlement was established in the "Caribbean" in 1493; within the next fifty years mainland Spanish colonial settlements included Culacán (1533), Navidad, Acapulco (1527), México (1519), Veracruz (1519), Guatemala (1519), Trumillo (1525), Puerto Bello (1513), Panama (1519), Cartagena (1533), Coro (1527), Santa Fé de Bogotá (1538), Popayán (1536), Quito (1534), Puerto Viejo (1535), Guyaquil (1535), San Miguel (1532), Ciudad de los Reyes [Lima] (1535), Cuzco (1535), La Paz (1548), Sucre (1540), Potosí (1546), Asunción (1537), La Serena (1544), and Santa María de Buen Aire (1536).
                There were innumerable other migratory Europeans who illegally immigrated onto our Continents, for whom documentation has not survived.  There were huge fleets of fishing boats at the Grand Banks off of Newfoundland.  The fishermen went ashore to dry the fish they took; some stayed as permanent residents and most were not celibate while ashore.  Slave boats carried Africans, Moorish and other mixed-bloods, and convicts.  Columbus' tall tales of gold lured fortune-seekers from all of Europe, and unimaginable Spanish plunder attracted large numbers of pirates, most of whose land bases are undocumented.

   116.   . (1913). Handbook of the Indians of Canada.  Published as an appendix to the tenth report of the Geographic Board of Canada . Ottawa: C. H. Parmeleee.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:52), "This publication is a reprint of information extracted from the earlier two-volume Handbook [1907-1910] ... Hodge gave his assent to this project, but the actual work was directed by James White, who did an admirable job."

   117.   Have yourself a pagan little Christmas. (1993). American Airlines Flight Magazine.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   118.   (1987). Women Make Movies.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women, Race & Ethnicity Database], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: This film is a portrait of Carole Lafavor, an Ojibwa woman with AIDS, who has come to terms with her illness through a combination of Native American spiritualism and modern medicine.

   119.   (1995).  [Recording]. Winnipeg, Man., Canada : Sunshine.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 34409066
Abstract: Sung in undetermined Native American language(s). Credits on container insert. Various performers. Recorded on location at the 3rd Annual Grand Celebrations Pow Wow, July 29-31, 1994 at Hinckley, Minn. v. 1. Grand entry ; Flag song (Yellow Hammer) ; Veteran song (Mandari) ; Intertribal (Northern Cree) ; Crow hop (Mandari) ; Intert[r]ibal (Yellow Hammer) ; Intert[r]ibal (Eagle Claw) ; Intertribal (Whitefish Jrs.) ; Intert[r]ibal (Haystack) ; Intert[r]ibal (Iron Wood) ; Intert[r]ibal (Dakota Nation) ; Intert[r]ibal (Lake Shore) ; Exabition [i.e. Exhibition?] song (Whitefish Jrs.) ; Intert[r]ibal (Eyabay) -- v. 2. Intertribal (Sioux Assiniboine) ; Contest song (Eyabay) ; Crow hop (Northern Cree) ; Contest song (Yellow Hammer) ; Woman's traditional (Mandari) ; Woman's fancy shawl (Dakota Nation) ; Contest song (Iron Wood) ; Jingle dress (Whitefish Jrs.) ; Side step (Haystack) ; Contest song (Whitefish Bay Singers) ; Contest song (the Boyz) ; Intertribal (Red Spirit) ; Fancy dance (Northern Cree).

   120.   Historical Atlas and Chronology of County Boundaries, 1788-1980  [Minnesota]. (1984). Boston, MA: G.K. Hall.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
At head of title: Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography, the Newberry Library. Computerized data file available under title: County boundaries of selected U.S. territories/states, 1790-1980. Includes bibliographies. v. 1. Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania / compiled by John H. Long -- v. 2. Illinois, Indiana, Ohio / compiled by Stephen L. Hansen -- v. 3. Michigan, Wisconsin  / compiled by Hugo P. Leaming, John H. Long -- v. 4. Iowa, Missouri / compiled by Adele Hast, John H. Long -- v. 5. Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota / compiled by Mark P. Donovan, Jeffrey D. Siebert.
Long, John Hamilton. Hermon Dunlap Smith Center for the History of Cartography. County boundaries, 1788-1980.

   121.   History of Genesse county, Michigan with illustrations and biographical sketches of its prominent men and pioneers. (1879). Philadelphia: Everts and Abbott.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:51)

   122.   . (1878). History of Goodhue County, including a sketch of the territory and state of Minnesota; together with an account of the early French discoveries, Indian massacres, the part borne by Minnesota's patriots in the war of the great rebellion, and a full and complete history of the county from the time of its occupancy by Swiss missionaries in 1838. Pioneer incidents, biographical sketches of early and prominent settlers and representative men, and of its cities, towns, churches, schools, secret societies, etc.  Red Wing, Minn.: Wood, Alley, & Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21021968 ... accession: 5686318

   123.   The history of Minnesota troops. (1889). St. Paul.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26199663

   124.   . (1995). Hmong and native American culture and history report (Through the eyes of others) . La Crosse, Wis.  [Western Wisconsin Technical College].
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Dedicated to all the people who have suffered the pain of discrimination." "May 1995." Bibliography: p. 59-61

   125.   (1990). [video]. Women Make Movies.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women, Race & Ethnicity Database], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: In this short video, lesbian and gay Native Americans talk about their roles in their communities. Includes interviews with members of the Inyupik, Lakota, Ojibwa, Mohawk, and Delaware nations

   126.   Hotel Minnesota : favorite summer resort of the Park Region : 230 miles northwest of St. Paul, on the Northern Pacific Railroad, Detroit Lake, Minnesota, John K. West, manager. (1889). Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7855677. Cover title.

   127.   (<1968). [slides].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "A set of twenty-three slides which present a very good idea of how a canoe is constructed."

   128.   . (1889). Illustrated Album of Biography of Southwestern Minnesota containing biographical sketches of hundreds of prominent old settlers ... History of Minnesota, embracing an account of early exploration ... and a concise history of the Indian outbreak of 1862 : Presidents of the United States, embracing biographical sketches and a full-page portrait of each . Chicago: Occidental Publishing Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 21016612 ... accession: 12819565
Abstract: Includes biographical index. Microfilmed from original in Cox Library. With: Minnesota, its story and biography

   129.   Illustrated album of biography of Southwestern Minnesota : containing biographical sketches of hundreds of prominent old settlers...:History of Minnesota, embracing an account of early exploration...and a concise history of the Indian outbreak of 1862 : Presidents of the United States, embracing biographical sketches and a full-page portrait of each. (1889). Chicago : Occidental Publishing Co.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7429058

   130.   Impact : Indian gaming in the State of Minnesota : a study of the economic benefits and tax revenue generated. (1992). [Minneapolis, Minn.] : Midwest Hospitality Advisors.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26847127.  "February 1992." "Commissioned by: Sodak Gaming Supplies, Inc."  Other: Sodak Gaming Supplies, Inc. Midwest Hospitality Advisors. Indian gaming in the State of Minnesota.

   131.   (19??). Independent School District 38, Red Lake, Minnesota Year Ended June 30, ... (Vols. v. ; 28 cm.). Saint Paul, Minn: State Auditor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25703636

   132.   . (1970). Indian Americans in Southside Minneapolis : additional field notes from the urban slums  . Minneapolis : Training Centers for Community Programs, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 5534432. "USOE grant OEC-0-8-080147- 2805." Other: Gibbons, Richard P. University of Minnesota. Training Center for Community Programs

   133.   (<1968). [Posters, charts and reprints].  Northwoods Art Center, Route No. 1, Minoqua, Wisconsin.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:98), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"

   134.   (19uu 1uuu). Indian Community Action Project Newsletter (Vols. Description based on: Apr. 11, 1969). Bemidji, Minn.  Bemidji State College.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11901037

   135.   (1972). Boise Cascade Center for Community Development, Idaho.
Notes: ERIC NO: ED134350
Abstract: As the appendices to an evaluation of the Economic Development Administration's (EDA) Selected Indian Reservation Program, this portion of the evaluation report presents individualized evaluations of each of the 16 reservations originally selected for the program in 1967. Each reservation evaluation is presented in terms of the following format: conclusions and recommendations; setting and background; and project analyses. The 16 reservations which are evaluated include the following: Annette Island, Alaska; Blackfeet, Montana; Crow, Montana; Crow Creek, South Dakota; Fort Berthold, North Dakota; Gila River, Arizona; Lower Brule, South Dakota; Mescalero, New Mexico; Navajo (Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah); Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Red Lake, Minnesota; Rosebud, South Dakota; Salt River, Arizona; San Carlos, Arizona;  Standing Rock, North Dakota; Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico. (JC)

   136.   (1990). [Audiovisual].  Bemidji, MN : Indian Education.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24580818
Abstract: Introduction by Rudy Perpich. VHS format. Various Indian graduates speak about the help they received for their education through the Minnesota Indian Scholarship Program.

   137.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "This film surveys the contributions of the Americans [sic] to modern American culture.  Excellent protrayal of Indian gifts to America."

   138.   (1971). [Audiovisual].  Minneapolis : Minneapolis Public Schools.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6080589.  Other: Minneapolis Public Schools. Special School District No. l. Minnesota Indian leaders. Filmstrip
Abstract: Title on record : Minnesota Indian leaders. A project funded under Title III E.S.E.A. Public Law 92-47, Minnesota State Department of Education. Director, Charles Buckanaga ; writer, John Harper. Presents the Indian qualifications of leadership. Discusses some contemporary Minnesota Indians in leadership positions who are seeking better social, economic and political environments for Indians.

   139.   (1951). Indian Leaflets of the Science Museum, Saint Paul, Minnesota (Vols. no.1/4-13). St. Paul: Science Museum.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4424980.. Other: Science Museum, St. Paul. Science Museum, St. Paul. Indian leaflets

   140.   Indian post-secondary preparation programs : report to the Legislature, FY 1984-85. (1985). Minn.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13100145. Caption title.

   141.   Indian Scouts, 1866-1874, roll 70. (Microfilm Series 233. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   142.   Indian Scouts, 1878-81 and 1914. (Microfilm Series 233. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   143.   Indian Tribes as Sovereign Governments, a Sourcebook on Federal-Tribal History, Law and Policy. (1988). Oakland: American Indian Lawyer Training Program Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   144.   Indians of Minnesota. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:98), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Reproductions of photographs and paintings showing the two tribes of Minnesota, the Sioux and Chippewa.  Excellent for pointing out the differences between the two tribes."

   145.   Indians of Minnesota. (1965). Detroit, MI: Hearne Brothers, Inc.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"

   146.   (1980). [Indians of North America folder in pamphlet file].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 26604585
Abstract: Indians of North America (map) -- Peoples of the Arctic (map) -- A guide to conducting a conference with American Indian women in reservation areas -- Land of the Maya (map) -- The Indian Education Act of 1972 -- American Indian sacred lands -- Bureau of Indian Affairs' contract for management and operations of Indian trust funds - - Indian students in Minnesota's private colleges -- Minnesota Indian Affairs Council annual report, 1987-88 - Internal controls, Indian housing controls improved but need strengthening -- Welfare eligibility, programs treat Indian tribal trust fund payments inconsistently -- Personal practices, propriety of selected personnel actions at the Bureau of Indian Affairs -- Montana Indian reservations, funding of selected services, taxation of real property -- Results of the 1990 off-reservation treaty deer and bear hunting seasons in Wisconsin -- American Indian civil rights handbook -- Casting light upon the waters -- "1854 Treaty" resource management -- Protecting and preserving rights and resources -- Bureau of Indian affairs, long- standing internal control weaknesses warrant congressional attention. Biological impact of the Chippewa off-reservation treaty harvest, 1983-1989 -- Indian affairs, statistical data on Indian rights cases handled by justice -- A guide to understanding Chippewa treaty rights (2 different pamphlets) - - The circle (newspaper) -- 1990 Chippewa spearing season -- Biological and commercial catch statistics -- Directions in Chippewa off-reservation resource management -- Indian programs, BIA and Indian tribes are taking action to address dam safety concerns -- Indian programs, profile of land ownership at 12 reservations -- Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission 1990 annual report -- Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission 1989 annual report -- Chippewa treaty harvest of natural resources -- Indian alcoholism in St. Paul -- Minnesota Indian people selected health statistics. Indian health service, funding based on historical patterns, not need -- Indians programs, tribal influence in formulating budget priorities is limited -- Internal controls, BIA section 638 contracts with tribal organizations -- Economic impact of the 1837 and 1842 Chippewa treaties -- GAO observations on timber harvesting and forest development needs on Indian reservations -- Social mechanisms in Gros Ventre gambling -- Food assistance programs, nutritional adequacy of primary food programs on four Indian reservations -- Adequacy of nutrition programs on Indian reservations -- Special education, estimates of handicapped Indian preschoolers and sufficiency of services -- The Dakota bark house -- Food assistance programs, recipient and expert views on food assistance at four Indian reservations -- Bureau of Indian Affairs' efforts to reconcile and audit Indian trust funds -- Bureau of Indian Affairs' efforts to reconcile, audit, and manage the Indian trust funds -- Indian programs, Navajo-Hopi resettlement program.
 SUBJECT: Indians of North America. Indians of North America -- Health and hygiene. Indians of North America -- Nutrition. Indians of North America -- Treaties. Spear fishing. Maps.

   147.   Information respecting the history, condition and prospects of the Indian tribes of the United States.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   148.   Inquiring about American History.  Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   149.   International Cultural Survival Act of 1988 (H.R. 4738) "to protect and promote cultural survival throughout the world". (1988). Cultural Survival Quarterly, 12(2), 67.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   150.   . Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   151.   Irregularly Shaped Papers, Item 104, Report of the Chippewa Commission, 1889-90. (Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   152.   Irregularly shaped papers, Item 104, Report of the Chippewa Commission, 1889-90. (Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   153.   Irregularly shaped papers, item 105, Chippewa Census Rolls. (Record Group 75.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   154.   Joe Pete. (1992). Michigan History, 76(3), 42.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Larry Massie introduces Joe Pete, a 1929 novel about a young Ojibwa man on Sugar Island.

   155.   Journal of the Twentieth Annual Conference, with representatives of Missionary Boards and Indian-Rights Association. (1891). Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs .  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   156.   Journals of the Continental Congress, (25), 681-683, 693.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   157.   Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Sokaogon Chippewa Indian Community, Mole Lake Band of Wisconsin, St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Lac Du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, plaintiffs, vs. State of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Natural Resources Board, Carrol D. Besadny, James Huntoon, and George Meyer, defendents, in the United In the United States District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin before the Honorable James E. Doyle. (1985). Madison, Wis: United States District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18007599.  Photocopy. Madison, Wis. : United States District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin, 1985. 28 cm.  Other: Besadny, Carrol D. Huntoon, James. Meyer, George. Doyle, James E. Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Sokaogon Chippewa Indian Community. Mole Lake Band of Wisconsin. St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin. Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Lac Du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Wisconsin. Natural Resources Board. United States. District Court (Wisconsin : Western District)

   158.   Land Records, Halfbreed Scrip. (, General Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, 7450 Boston Boulevard, Springfield, VA 22153-3121.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   159.   Land Records, "Homestead Entry". (, General Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, 7450 Boston Boulevard, Springfield, VA 22153-3121.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   160.   Land Records, Veterans Scrip. (, General Land Office, Bureau of Land Management, 7450 Boston Boulevard, Springfield, VA 22153-3121.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   161.   Law and Order Provisions, Red Lake Reservation; Red Lake Court of Indian Offenses. (1990). Redlake, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   162.   Lawful gambling in Minnesota . (1992). St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota CLE.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25651013
Abstract: "Lawful gambling"--Spine. 91-00.27 State regulation and the current regulatory structure / Mary B. Magnuson -- Lawful purpose and allowable expense / Lee J. Graczyk -- Gambling crimes / Catherine E. Avina -- Drafting the local ordinance: an analysis of an annotated model / Suesan Pace-Shapiro -- The Indian gaming industry / Henry M. Buffalo -- Excerpt from the report to the legislature on the status of Indian gambling in Minnesota / submitted by Mary B. Magnuson -- State and federal tax issues / Eve R. Borenstein.

   163.   League Elects Ziewacz. (1990). The Municipality, 85(12), 422 .
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Delegates Elect North Fond du Lac Village President to Lead League

   164.   (1973).  [Recording]. [St. Paul] : Minnesota Educational Radio.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7910066
Abstract: Debate before the Minnesota Senate Natural Resources and Agricultural Committee concerning hunting, fishing and ricing rights ... includes discussion of a permanent agreement giving access and usage rights on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation to the Chippewa. March 6, 1973.

   165.   Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-81, Roll 168: Chippewa Agency, 1880 and Chippewa Agency Emigration, 1850-59, and Chippewa Agency Reserves, 1853-55. (.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)\
National Archives Microfilm Publications, Microcopy No. 234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, 1824-81, Roll 168: Chippewa Agency, 1880 and Chippewa Agency Emigration, 1850-59, and Chippewa Agency Reserves, 1853-55.  N.A.R.A.

   166.   A List of the Mixed-Blood Chippewa of Lake Superior, 1839. (1991). Lost in Canada?, 16(1), 27.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   167.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "An Indian legend brought to life about a loon and how it got its distinguishing neckband."

   168.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "This film tells the story of the wild rice.  Tells especially well the techniques used by the Chippewa Indians in harvesting and processing, plus the purchasing of the rice by the buyers and modern processing operations."

   169.   (1998). Many streams make a river : proceedings of National Conference on Community Systems Building and Services Integration Arlington, VA (2000 15th Street, North, Suite 701, Arlington, 22291-2616) : National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  United States. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Health Systems Research, Inc.
Abstract: Conference overview. -- Workshop summaries: Showcase of innovative programs. Hale Empowerment and Revitalization Organization. -- National Native American AIDS Prevention Center. -- Hillsborough County Health Care Plan. -- Local INvestment Commission (LINC). -- Rural Partnership for Children. -- Growing Into Life Task Force. -- Healthy Families Partnership. -- Workshop summaries: Technical assistance workshops. Asset-Based Community Development Institute. -- Parent Training Program : selecting the best program and staff training for your community. -- Coalition for Healthier Cities and Communities. -- The DELTA Project. -- Harrison Institute for Public Law. -- Health Systems Research, Inc. -- Together We Can Survive. -- National Training and Technical Assistance Center. -- Replication: increasing the return on social investment. -- Maternal and Child Health National Center for Cultural Competence. (cont.) Concurrent sessions: showcase of innovative programs. Baltimore City Health Start Program. -- Mercy Children's Health Outreach Project. -- Michigan Public Health Institute. -- Ready 2 Work: family-centered community transition services. -- Comprehensive Community Health and Services Program of Project Vida. -- Vermont's comprehensive, community-based system of care for children and adolescents. - - Group presentations. Serving children with special health care needs and their families: Washington State systems- building and services integration activities. -- Enhancing access and capacity through nontraditional providers: Wisconsin State systems-building and services integration activities. -- Parent-professional collaboration methods. (cont.) Appendices: Agenda. -- Steering committee members. -- Participants list.

   170.   (1981). [Audiovisual].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 9806105
Abstract: Counters: 000-128 Music department, opera workshop -- 029-069 Glensheen mansion -- 070-106 School of business, small business student consulting program -- 107- 142 American Indian studies, learning resources for Indian students -- 143-181 Medical school family practice internship program -- 182-227 Medical school, hypothermia research -- 228-end Industrial, technical studies department, masters program in industrial safety. Contains the segments of Matrix concerning the Duluth campus and UMD activities.

   171.   McIntyre Report, Item 368. (Record Group 75. manuscript.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   172.   Memorial from the Half-Breeds of Pembina, to his Excellency, Alexander Ramsey, Governor of Minnesota Territory. (1849).  Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   173.   The Memorial of the Chippeway tribe of Indians some of whom reside on their reserve near Sarnia, and others on Walpole Island together with other documents praying that they may be allowed to form themselves into one tribe, as they were prior to 1831, and to hold their lands and moneys in common, and that the foreign Indians may be hereafter excluded from participating in the annuity. (1871). Sarnia?  "Canadian" Power-Press Print.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Preface signed: Wm. N. Fisher

   174.   Memorial to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled, relating the condition of affairs on the White Earth Indian Reservation and a petititon asking for some adequate measures of relief . (1912).  The Mahnomen pioneer.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23683792. Cover title. Signed by A.L. Thompson, chairman, and Fred Dennis, acting secretary.   Other: Commercial Club (Becker County, Minn.) Commercial Club (Mahnomen County, Minn.)

   175.   (1992). [Recording].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." A collection of folktales and stories told in Menominee with English translations.

   176.   Menominee report. (1956).  Citizens Natural Resources Association of Wisconsin.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

   177.   Message from the President of the United States, transmitting communication from the Secretary of the Interior, with papers relating to the Chippewa Indians in Minnesota. (1887). United States Senate, 49th Congress, 2d session, Executive Document No. 115 .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   178.   Message of the President of the United States, A treaty [sic] between the United States and chiefs, headmen, and warriors of Red Lake and Pembina bands of Chippewa Indians, concluded on the 2d of October, 1863; January 8, 1864.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
38th Congress, 1st Session, Confidential Executive Papers, Message of the President of the United States, A treaty [sic] between the United States and chiefs, headmen, and warriors of Red Lake and Pembina bands of Chippewa Indians, concluded on the 2d of October, 1863 ; January 8, 1864--Treaty read the first time, referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs, and ordered to be printed in confidence for the use of the Senate.

   179.   ([Minnesota] Census, 1865-1905. microfilm.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
published by the Minnesota Historical Society

   180.   (1989). The Minnesota Explorer,  2.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   181.   (1924). [Audiovisual].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 30572139
Abstract: Views of the health department's services and clinics, mainly in northern Minnesota on the Leech Lake Indian Reservation, Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, and Red Lake Indian Reservation. Included are views of Indian dwellings and activities, including wild ricing. Also views at Pine Bend and Goodhue County.

   182.   Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: Part 1. (1997). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (17), 1635.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   183.   Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: Part 2. (1997). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (18), 1731.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   184.   Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: Part 3 (Brown County). (1998). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (19), 1841.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   185.   Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: Part 4 (Fort Ridgeley). (1998). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (20), 1939.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   186.   (1981).  [Recording]. New York, N.Y.  Clearwater Publishing.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7756237

   187.   (1981).  [Recording]. New York : Clearwater Publishing.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7766673
Abstract: Program notes in container. This interview is continued on v. 2, no. 26. May Eastman, Ida Kitto, Philip Heminger, Keith Wakeman, Harriet Blue, interviewees; V. J. Gupta, Vince Pratt, Dr. Herbert Hoover, interviewers. Recorded in Summer 1971. Discussion of the events leading up to the uprising, the uprising itself and its aftermath including the trials, imprisonment and executions and the scattering of the Sioux which followed.

   188.   (1981).  [Recording]. New York : Clearwater Publishing.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7766727
Abstract: Program notes in container. This interview is continued from v. 2, no. 25. May Eastman, Fred Eastman, Philip Heminger, Norman Crooks, Jeanette Weston, Joseph Good Thunder, interviewees; V. J. Gupta, Dr. Herbert Hoover, interviewers. Recorded in Summer 1971. Descriptions of the treament of the prisoners and their families after the uprising. An account of the role of Chief Little Crow in the uprising and his subsequent death and beheading.

   189.   Minnesota--White Earth. (1994). The Journal of American Indian Family Research, 15(2), 14.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   190.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "A reasonably fair picture of the Chippewa produced a few years ago.  Produced on a Chippewa reservation."

   191.   (1992). [Audiovisual].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: "A kit compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." Stockbridge-Munsee: Mahikan (Marlene Molly Miller) -- Oneida (Emily Schwamp and Lavinia Webster) -- Winnebago (Ervin Funmaker) -- Potawatomi (Mary Daniels) -- Menominee (Dave Matchapatow). A collection of folktales and stories told in Native American languages with English translations.

   192.   (197u). Native American News Menomonie, Wis.  Native American Awareness, University of Wisconsin--Stout.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 2 (Apr. 1979); cover.

   193.   . (1974). Native lumber : an anthology of Wisconsin poetry  . Green Bay, Wis.  Friends of Art of the Neville Public Museum.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

   194.   . (1976). Native peoples [Environmental assessment and site recommendation, Integrated Forest Products Complex] . Niagara Falls, Ont.  Reed Paper Ltd.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25432815.  At head of title : Environmental assessment and site recommendation, Integrated Forest Products Complex, Ear Falls/Red Lake area, Reed Paper Ltd. Bibliography : p. 21.

   195.   (9999). Native Wisconsin : Official Guide to Native American Communities in Wisconsin Lac du Flambeau, WI : Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc. [and] Wisconsin Native American Heritage Tourism Initiative.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  Description based on: [1997]; title from cover.

   196.   (1980).  & D. D. U. o. K. F. R. S. Stull. Lawrence, KS : University of Kansas, Film Rental Services.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: Deals with the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Indians, using original footage shot between 1927 and 1941 and interviews with elderly Potawatomi conducted in 1979. Shows traditional domestic, subsistence, and religious activities and tells of their continued battle against assimilation.

   197.   (1987?).  & D. D. U. o. C. B. E. M. C. Stull. Berkeley, Calif.  University of California, Extension Media Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: VHS format. Deals with the Prairie Band of Potawatomi Indians, using original footage shot between 1927 and 1941 and interviews with elderly Potawatomi conducted in 1979. Shows traditional domestic, subsistence, and religious activities and tells of their continued battle against assimilation

   198.   The New Commissioner Gets Down to Business: An Interview. (1980). American Indian Journal , 6(3), 16-21.
Notes: ERIC NO: EJ222309
Abstract: William Hallett, Red Lake Chippewa and the new head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, discusses such topics as (1) his new job, (2) ideas for change in the BIA (staff mobilization, clarification of bureau objectives, reorganization), (3) economic development for tribes, (4) education, and (5) Indian preference. (DS)

   199.   . (1988). The New Credit cemeteries of New Credit Reserve, Tuscarora Township, Brant County  . Brantford, Ont.  Brant County, Ontario Genealogical Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   200.   New Deal in Minnesota. (1991). The Blood-Horse, 117(48), 5702.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Holding its own against charitable gambling, the lottery, and dog racing, Canterbury Downs suffered disastrous business declines when local Indian tribes began offering blackjack at tribal casinos.

   201.   The New Roget's Thesaurus of the English Language in dictionary form. (1961). Garden City, N.Y.,  Garden City Books .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"Based on C. O. Sylvester Mawson's alphabetical arrangement of the famous Roget system of word classification."
Lewis, Norman, 1912- ed. Mawson, C. O. Sylvester (Christopher Orlando Sylvester), 1870- 1938. Roget's Thesaurus of the English language in dictionary form. Roget's Thesaurus of the English language in dictionary form.

   202.   (1868 October). The New York Times.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   203.   (1868 October). The New York Times.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   204.   (1868 October). The New York Times.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   205.   (197u). News [News (Native American Solidarity Committee. Madison Chapter) Madison Chapter News] Madison, Wis.] : Native American Solidarity Committee. Madison Chapter.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)

   206.   . (1996). A'nicina'be manido' minesikan = Chippewa beadwork  [Anish' na be manido' minesikan] . [Bismarck, ND] : State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 96620212. A museum exhibit, North Dakota Heritage Center, Bismarck, North Dakota, October 1994 to September 1996"--P. [2] of cover. Includes bibliographical references (p. [29]). Title proper in Ojibwa language.

   207.   North America.  International work group for Indigenous affairs. (1996-1997). Indigenous World (Copenhagen),  43-53.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XLIII (1998:177)

   208.   The Northern water route : Lake Superior to the Red River of the North. (1880). St. Paul : J.W. Cunningham.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19217825.  Title from cover. Caption title: Report to the president of the Duluth Chamber of Commerce. Signed: Dan'l G. Cash, George R. Stuntz.   Other: Cash, Dan'l G. (Daniel G.) Stuntz, George Riley, 1820-1902. Duluth Chamber of Commerce (Duluth, Minn.) Lake Superior to the Red River of the North.

   209.   (197u). Northland Native American News [Northland's Native American News] Ashland, WI : Northland College, Native American Studies Dept.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Description based on Jan. 1977 and Jan. 1978 issues.

   210.   Northwest Ordinance. (1787).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   211.   Noteworthy. (1996). Museum News, 75(3), 24.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Mille Lacs Indian Museum.

   212.   Notice--The Initial Meeting of the American Indian Law Section. (1995). The Michigan Bar Journal, 74(1), 77.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   213.   Notice - The Initial Meeting of the American Indian Law Section. (1995). The Michigan Bar Journal, 74(2).
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   214.   Notice - The Initial Meeting of the American Indian Law Section! (1995). The Michigan Bar Journal, 74(3), 247.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   215.   [obituary of Isaac Tuttle]. (1874). The Spirit of Missions.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[published by the Protestant Episcopal Church]

   216.   Ojibwa Summer. (1972).  Black Ice Publishers.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   217.   Ojibway Chiefs: Portraits of Anishinaabe Leadership. (1999).  Coyote Books.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   218.   (1982). (Report No. map distributed by the Bemidji Chamber of Commerce).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   219.   Ojibwe-Museum Reopens (Mille-Lacs-Indian-Museum in Onamia, Minnesota, Moves Into New Quarters). (1996). American History, 31(2), 9.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

   220.   (1988). Old Crossing History Days, the Treaty of 1863  (Vols. Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept.-Oct. 1988)- ). [Red Lake Falls, MN] : Association des Francais du Nord .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24220304.  Title from cover.

   221.   On the reservation [Coming Home]. (1986). Roots, 14(3), [whole issue].
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13709117. Other: Gilman, Carolyn, 1954- Coming home. 1986. Molin, Paulette Fairbanks. "Places where I've lived." 1986. Vizenor, Gerald Robert, 1934- Laurel Hole In the Day. 1986. Brill, Charles. Portrait of Red Lake. 1986. Coming home. "Places where I've lived." Laurel Hole In the Day. Portrait of Red Lake.
Abstract: Title from cover. Coming home / by Carolyn Gilman -- "Places where I've lived" / by Paulette Fairbanks Molin -- Laurel Hole In the Day / by Gerald Vizenor -- Portrait of Red Lake / photos by Charles Brill -- Digging deeper, branching out / by Stephen Sandell

   222.   (1992). [Recording].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." A collection of folktales and stories told in Oneida with English translations.

   223.   Opening of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota, May 15. (1896). Harper's Weekly, 40, 555-556. 1 leaf . ill.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 35816486
Abstract: Detached from: Harper's weekly, v. 40, 1896, p. 555-556. Photographs of claimants entering ceded land on May 15, 1896

   224.   Original Land Entries: Part 1--Mixed Blood Indian Scrip. (1997). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (17), 1619.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   225.   Original Land Entries: Part 1: Mixed Blood/Indian Scrip. (1997). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (18), 1711.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   226.   Out of home placement of Indian children Indian child welfare act : Minnesota Indian family preservation act. (1990). St. Paul, Minn.  State of Minnesota, Indian Affairs Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25031624. Title from cover. ... accession: 22883776

   227.   (1833). [Pamphlets on Indians of North America. Part 2].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 32346708
Abstract: [40] Adlachemudiguichkek meiaulakwey, Tchibat'ku'musse. 1858 -- [41] Radical words of the Mohawk language, with their derivatives / by James Bruyas. Published from the original manuscript. n.d. -- [42] Cuibalba yin un ti' Conob. 1945 -- [43] Dictionary of the Chinook language, or, Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast. New ed. 1883 -- [44] Omaha and Ponka letters / by James Owen Dorsey. 1891 -- [45] Ponka A-B-C, Wa-Ba-Ru / J. Owen Dorsey. 1873 -- [46] Brief notes on the Pawnee, Winnebago, and Omaha languages / by F.V. Hayden. 1868 -- [47] Lakota on Wiwicayungapi kte cin / Indian Rights Association. 1888 -- [48] Etudes philologiques sur quelques langues sauvages de l'Amerique / par N.O. [Jean-Andre Cuoq]. 1866 -- [49] Kilak nuna imak / Fr. Nielsen. 1943 -- [50] Speakum Injun? A lexicon of North American Indian language and dialect / V.L.R. Simmons. c1939 -- [51] Universal Indian sign language of the Plains Indians of North America ... / by William Tomkins. 5th ed. 1931 -- [52] Indian names and meanings / compiled by Maurice S. White. c1935 -- [53] The gift of the Great Spirit / by Aren Akweks [Ray Fadden]. c1947 -- [54] The story of the Monster Bear, the Great Dipper / by Aren Akweks [Ray Fadden]. c1947 -- [55] William of Weningo / by Helen Alexander. c1947 -- [56] The Plains Absarokee / by Chief Max Big Man. c1936 -- [57] Birchbark tales / Charles E. Brown. 1941 -- [58] Cloud lore / Charles E. Brown. 1935 -- [59] Lake Mendota Indian legends / Charles E. Brown. 1927 -- [60] Wigwam tales / Charles E. Brown. 1st ed. 1930 -- [61] Indian fireside tales, Ka gwe do say-- Sunrise walker / Dorothy Moulding Brown. 1st ed. 1947 -- [62] Manabush, Menomini tales / Dorothy Moulding Brown. n.d. -- [63] Les naissances miraculeuses d'apres la tradition americaine / par le comte de Charencey. 1892 -- [64] Indian legends of California, Peek-Wa stories / by Chief and Mrs. Eaglewing. 1st ed. 1938 -- [65] Tleji or Yehbechai myth / by Hasteen Klah. 1938 -- [66] Black kettle / by Frank M. Lockard. 1924? -- [67] Meet Mr. Coyote, a series of B.C. Indian legends. 1944? -- [68] The rebirth of Reelfoot Lake and the legend of Kalopin / by Martha Grassham Purcell. 1929 - - [69] The Pymatuning Lake. c1935 -- [70] The Indian legend of White Lake the beautiful / by John O. Reed. c1925 -- [71] The Indian maiden of Saint Sacrament (Lake George) a story also A brief study of Indian origin, religion and habits / Charles LeRett Rice. 1926 -- [72] When the red gods made men / edited by Will H. Robinson. c1935 --

   228.   (1833). [Pamphlets on Indians of North America. Part 3].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 32346760
Abstract: [73] Lake Mendota, prehistory, history, and legends / Charles E. Brown. 1933 -- [74] Wisconsin Indians / Charles E. Brown. 1933 -- [75] Instructions for clan organization / Frank S. Burr. c1926 -- [76] The tragedy of the Indian / Frank S. Burr. c1926 -- [77] A true story of the Fool Soldiers and other Indian history / by Samuel Charger. c1928 -- [78] The Cherokees, 1540-1927 / by Mary Newman Fitzgerald. c1937 -- [79] An address on the early settlement of the valley of Pequea / delivered by Redmond Conyngham. 1842 -- [80] Dedication of the Oriskany Monument, August 6, 1884 : addresses / by John F. Seymour ... [et al.]. 1885 -- [81] Migration of the Iroquois / by Aren Akweks [Ray Fadden]. c1947 -- [82] Migration of the Tuscaroras / Ray Fadden. c1947 -- [83] Life and death of Sitting Bull / Frank Bennett Fiske. 1st ed. 1933 -- [84] Sekinermiut / Harald Lindow. 1923 -- [85] A brief account of the Indians in the township of North Hempstead and their dealings with the white settlers / H.C.V. Mann. 1924 -- [86] The Menominee Indian Reservation in Wisconsin. 1944 -- [87] Pawnee naming ceremonial near Pawnee, Oklahoma, Armistice Day, November 11, 1932, the naming of Wyo- La Shar. 1933 -- [88] Indians of desert, mesa, and canyon / Henry G. Peabody. c1940 -- [89] Record of engagements with hostile Indians within the military district of the Missouri, from 1868 to 1882, Lieutenant-General P.H. Sheridan, commanding. 1882 -- [90] The tradition of the Cheyenne Indians / by John H. Seger. 1932? -- [91] History of the Penobscot Tribe of Indians / by Florence Nicola Shay. 1942? -- [92] The Indian of the Southwest-- today, yesterday, and the days before that / by E.C. Slates. c1934 -- [93] Red Clay in history / John Morgan Wooten. 1935? -- [94] Bonampak. 1947? -- [95] Description of the collection of gold ornaments from the "huacas" or graves of some aboriginal races of the north western provinces of South America belonging to Lady Brassey / by Bryce-Wright. 1885 -- [96] History of the mound builders / by M.F. Compton (1923). 1938 -- [97] Iroquois Indian games and dances / drawn by Jesse Cornplanter. c1903 -- [98] Aboriginal cultures of the Western Hemisphere / Golden Gate International Exposition, 1940, Treasure Island, San Francisco. 1940 -- [99] The Indian relic collectors guide / G.I. Groves. c1936 -- [100] The story of the Smoki people / Sharlot M. Hall. c1922 -- [101] The Indian and Mexican building, Albuquerque, N.M. / Fred Harvey. 13th ed. 1903? -- [102] Notes on the Indian burial mounds of eastern North Carolina / J.A. Holmes. 1933? - - [103] Indian life in the Northwest. 1925? Accordian-fold of nine color postcards -- [104] Instructions relative to the ethnology and philology of America. Appendix A. 1865 -- [105a- e. Five pamphlets on Navajo blankets] / by H.P. Mera. c1938- c1940 -- [106] Indian picture writings in southern California / by George Robert Momyer. c1937 -- [107] An inquiry into the distinctive characteristics of the aboriginal race of America / by Samuel George Morton. 2nd ed. 1844 -- [108] Eskimaux et Koloches, idees religieuses et traditions des Kaniagmioutes / par Alphonse Pinart. 1873 -- [109] Indian relics, their probable worths and other information / Oliver Edwin Pontious. 1921 -- [110] Ceramics as evidence of a prehistoric tie among American peoples / Arthur Posnansky. 1947? --

   229.   (1977). (Report No. ERIC NO: ED270262). Minneapolis, MN: Minneapolis Public Schools.
Notes: NOTES: 21p. For other titles in this series, see RC 015 765-774.  Special School District No. 1, Minneapolis Public Schools - Planning, Development and Evaluation, 807 Northeast Broadway, Minneapolis, MN 55413-2398 (not sold separately; series consists of 10 booklets--1 set, $2.75, plus $5.00 billing charge unless prepaid).
Abstract: A biography for elementary school students of Patrick Des Jarlait (Ojibwe), an American Indian painter, includes photographs of the artist and some of his work. A teacher's guide following the bibliography contains excerpts from the artist's published reminiscences about his childhood, learning objectives and directions for teachers, suggested activities, vocabulary list, resource list, evaluation checklist, and a map of the Red Lake Indian Reservation. (LFL)

   230.   (1987). The Peoples Voice  (Vols. Vol. 1, [no. 1], (Jan. 22, 1987)- ). Published at: Kanienkehaka Territory,  Rooseveltown, N.Y., Cornwall, Ont., and Kahnawake, Quebec,  <June 11, 1987>-Jan. 7, 1988; and at: Kanienkahaka  Territory, Akwesasne [i.e. Hogansburg], N.Y., and St. Regis,  Quebec, Feb. 3, 1988-<May 16, 1994>. "Akwesasne's weekly newspaper", <1993- 1994>..
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   231.   (1994). Personal Ancestral File 2.31 Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Title from disk labels. Family records (FR) -- Configure programs (CONFIG) -- Family records check (FRCHK) -- Genealogical information exchange program (GIE) -- Research data filer (RDF) -- TempleReady. Software package designed to record genealogical information, organize it, identify areas of needed research, and share information with others. System requirements: IBM-PC or compatible; MS-DOS operating system; 640K memory; DOS 2.0 or above; 2 drives (floppy or hard disk); printer (optional); mouse (optional). IBM-PC.

   232.   (195u). [Audiovisual].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 36006236
Abstract: Title supplied by cataloger. Pharmacist at dispensing window, two young children peer over the countertop into the pharmacy. Shot of the sink and some shelving.

   233.   (1989 December). Pioneer, p. 10.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   234.   (1989). Bemidji, MN:
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   235.   (1971). The Pioneer [The Pioneer (Bemidji, Minn.) Pioneer (Bemidji, Minn. : 1971)//The Sunday Pioneer, Jan. 9, 1977-Dec. 23, 1979//Bemidji Daily Pioneer (OCoLC) 32532675].
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Vol. 69:18-112 (May 11-Aug. 31, 1971) filmed with: Bemidji daily pioneer, v.68:349-v.69:17 (May 1- 10, 1971). Microfilm. Wooster, Ohio : Bell & Howell, 19-- microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

   236.   (1980). [Audiovisual].  Minneapolis, MN : UCVideo.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18877205
Abstract: Title from data sheet. With: Celebration. Photographers, Tom Adair, Sheldon Erickson ; film editor, Alan Moorman ; narrator, Lanae Sexton. Amos Owen, a Sioux Indian who lives on the Prairie Island Indian Reservation near Red Wing, Minn., demonstrates daily prayer ritual using the ceremonial pipe to establish communication with the universe and the Great Spirit.

   237.   Pipestone, Minnesota : legendary home of peace to all tribes: home of the world-famous red pipe stone, Longfellow's Falls of Winnewissa and the sacred Indian quarries. (1940). [Pipestone, Minn.] : Pipestone Civic and Commerce Ass'n.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8507927. Measures 16 x 9 cm. folded, 16 x 25 cm. unfolded.

   238.   Ponemah Peninsula on the Red Lake Reservation [Hand drawn map].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25809730
Abstract: Map drawn in pencil of settlement with census information included.

   239.   (1992). [Recording].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." A collection of folktales and stories told in Potawatomi with English translations.

   240.   Preliminary report to the Minnesota State Legislature . (1988). [Minn.] : Indian School Council .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 18979075
Abstract: Title from cover. "December 1, 1988." Bibliography: p. 33-35. Governance and control in the public education of American Indians / Indian School Council -- Proposed model for Indian Control of an Indian public school district / Indian School Council -- Proposed strategy for implementing governance and control of the public education of American Indians / Indian School Council -- Preliminary report to special school district no. 1 Minneapolis, Minnesota / by the American Indian Accreditation Team

   241.   Preservation News. (1999). Preservation, 51(3), 13.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Industrial relics endangered in Cleveland; Cities are destroying their neighborhoods, one house at a time; Michigan tradesmen empower low-income homeowners to do it themselves; A Sense of Cyberplace; Remembering Marshall Hall; Time's almost up forArizona tree carvings; Chicago artists fight to save their historic working and livingstudios; Development encroaches upon the Miami Circle, a downtown Tequesta Indiansite; Tiffany chapel's back. Florida's got it; Who's News.

   242.   Principal Indian Lands in the Minneapolis Area.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:98), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"

   243.   Proceedings of the Lake Mohonk Conference. (1890). Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs  (p. 839 ff.).  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   244.   A promise of presence: Studies in honor of David N. Power, O.M.I.  (1992). Washington, D.C.  Pastoral Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search)
Abstract: "Studies in honor of David N. Power, O.M.I."--Cover. Includes bibliographical references. "A bibliography of David Power's work": p. 313-321. Lex orandi, lex credendi : taking it seriously in systematic theology / Michael Downey -- Toward a theological anthropology of sacraments / Kevin W. Irwin -- The Word beneath the words / Mary Catherine Hilkert, O.P. -- Contributing credibly to a sacramental theology of liberation / Joseph J. Fortuna -- She laughs at the days to come : memory and metaphor / Sally Ann McReynolds, N.D. -- Wounded in extraordinary depths : towards a contemporary mystagogia / Richard N. Fragomeni -- The sacraments, interiority, and spiritual direction / Stephen Happel -- Devotio futura : the need for post-conciliar devotions? / Regis A. Duffy, O.F.M. -- The Roman Cathohlic response to Baptism, eucharist and ministry : the ecclesiological dimension / Geoffrey Wainwright -- Partnership : a challenge to clericalism / Warren Kinne, S.S.C. -- An African interpretation of liturgical inculturation : the Rite Zairois / Chris Nwaka Egbulem, O.P. -- "My Son's bread" : about culture, language and liturgy / Anthony Kain -- Sacrament : event eventing / David N. Power, O.M.I.

   245.   Proposal, an experimental Indian school in the city of Minneapolis. (1970).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12136684. Title from cover.

   246.   Proposal for the implementation of the American Indian Counseling Act (Chapter 113-HF no. 1193 Section 1 (241.80) (Laws of Minnesota 1985) : re-entry program directed toward Indian men and women, adult and youth within Minnesota correctional facilities . (1990). Minneapolis, MN : Heart of the Earth Survival School.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23979109. Title from cover. "January 29, 1990."--transmittal letter.
Abstract: Re-entry program directed toward Indian men and women, adult and youth within Minnesota correctional facilities.

   247.   Provisions of the Indian education bill : a response from the Minnesota State University System. (1989). St. Paul, Minn.  Minnesota State University System?
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19658095. Caption title. "February 1, 1989."

   248.   (197u). Ram's Horn II (Vols. Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 2 ([1977?]). ). St. Paul, Minn.  Dept. of Indian Works, [St. Paul Area Council of Churches].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18201489 ... accession: 18067249. Other: Saint Paul Area Council of Churches. Dept. of Indian Works

   249.   Red Lake Agency affidavits of relationship. (Microfilm 1204884 V+ *12048845009094*. microfilm.  Genealogical Society of Utah.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   250.   (1967).  [Recording].

   251.   Red Lake Indian Agency, Red Lake, Minnesota, Bureau of Indian Affairs (=United States.  Bureau of Indian Affairs.). (AMID 5-001. microfilm.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   252.   (197u). [Audiovisual].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 35616016
Abstract: Title supplied by cataloger. Shots of hospital and pharmacy buildings in Red Lake, Minn

   253.   Red Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota. Highway System Map. (1990).  Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

   254.   (1991). The Red Lake Nation : a Report to the People of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians Red Lake, MN : Red Lake Tribal Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29896179

   255.   (1966-1969). (Vols. .Vol. 1, no. 1 (Aug. 5, 1966)-v. 3, no. 32 (Mar. 28, 1969). ). Redlake, MN: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Tribal Council.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[partial set in the Ahnishinahbæótjibway Archives]
No more published? Masthead title in Vol. 1, no. 1: Red Lake news. Co-published by Red Lake Community Action Program (CAP), Aug. 5, 1966-Mar. 22, 1968.

   256.   (1915-1921). Redlake, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Description based on: Vol. 3, no. 8 (Jan. 1, 1915).

   257.   (1978). The Red Lake Tribal Council Review (Vols. Vol. 1, 1st ed. (May 1978)-). Red Lake, Minn.  Red Lake Indian Reservation Tribal Council.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Title from cover. First issue has title: The Red Lake Tribal Council review invites you to step through the years of progress on the Red Lake Reservation.

   258.   (1888-1900). The Red Man [Morning Star Red Man and Helper] (Vols. Vol. 8, no. 3 (Jan. 1888)-v. 16, no. 3 (June 1900).). Carlisle, PA: Indian Industrial School.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"An illustrated magazine printed by Indians." Microfilm. Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1974. 2 reels ; 35 mm.

   259.   (1969). Redlake Reservation Neighborhood Centers News   ...
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

   260.   Starkey, J., 1818-1892. (1891). Reminiscences of Indian depredations. The Sunrise and other expeditions ... read ... before the Minnesota commandery of the Loyal legion of the United States ... Feb. 10, 1891. St. Paul: D. Ramaley & Son.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19259549

   261.   Report of the Chippewa Commission, 1889-90, Irregularly Shaped papers, Item 104. (RG 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
These records, RG 75, Item 104, also contain the "signature rolls" of Chippewa assent to what many Indians call the "Rice Treaty."  My grandfather and great-grandfather's names were listed by the B.I.A. on these records, as are the names of many other Ahnishinahbæótjibway.  The "X" marks next to their names were all written by one person.

   262.   Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. (1890).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   263.   Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, to the Secretary of the Interior for the year 1871. (1872). Washington: Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   264.   Report to the Legislature on the status of Indian gambling in Minnesota . (1991). [St. Paul, Minn.] : Minnesota. Office of the Governor.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24730011. Title from cover. "September 5, 1991." Includes bibliographical references.  Other: Minnesota. Office of the Governor. Minnesota. Attorney General. Tribal-State Compact Negotiating Committee. ... accession: 26181697

   265.   Revised Red Lake Law and Order Code.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   266.   The River St. Clair and the Chippeway Indians [The First magazine article on Sarnia, 1837, Penny magazine]. (1984).  [G.L. Smith].
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), "Smith, George Leslie, 1922- "

   267.   Saving a million acres : what the Red Lake drainage project means to Minnesota. (1921). Western Magazine, 17(5), 157-159, ill.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19387595.  (OCoLC)10339652

   268.   Schedules of Allotments, Chippewas, Minnesota. (.
Notes:
There were three allotments actually issued from Red Lake, on land unilaterally claimed by the United States in 1889, to "Indians residing on the ceded portion of the Red Lake Reservation, in the State of Minnesota."  They were issued by U.S. Indian agent Edgar A. Allen, dated April 12, 1905, "under the provisions of the Act of Congress of May 27, 1902 (32 Statutes, Section 245-261) and under the instructions of the Indian Office (Land 26641-1905),"  listed in Schedules of Allotments, Chippewas, Minnesota, Volume 31, Office of Indian Affairs, National Archives, Record Group 75:

   269.   Senate Report Number 1031, 78th Congress, Second Session. (1944).  Government Printing Office.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   270.   Signature Rolls of the Chippewa Indians in Minnesota, 1889. (1996). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, 15(1435).
Notes: Source: UnCover

   271.   Signature Rolls of the Chippewa Indians in Minnesota, 1889. (1996). Minnesota Genealogical Journal, (16), 1435.
Notes: Source: UnCover

   272.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "This film presents the story of the Chippewa Indians and their first maple sugar harvest of the year.  Shows the entire process in an excellent manner."

   273.   Some Pottawatomies of Wisconsin. (1990). The Journal of American Indian Family Research, 11(3), 5.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   274.   A southern Ojibway glossary; ethnology, anthropology, archaeology. (1954). Minnesota Archaeologist, 19(1).
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search, "Cover title"

   275.   Spearing and Sport Angling for Walleye in Wisconsin's Ceded Territory. (1990). Wisconsin DNR Administrative Report , 31, 18.
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

   276.   [1/2" or 3/4" video. Intended audience: grades 4 through 9.  Videocassette].  Norwood, MA: Beacon Films.
Notes: Source: Family Studies Database [University of Minnesota online databases], August 1999 search
Abstract: A set of story drama set on an Ojibway Indian reservation in the wilderness of northern canada. The series provides insight into the character and culture of the Indian people, as it shows children bridging the gap between ancient customs and the modern world in a way that maintains traditional values. Can be used in both social studies and language arts.

   277.   (1836-1939). The Spirit of Missions
[Missionary Record of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America Forth]
New York//Burlington, NJ: Board of Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Includes the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Society. Microfilm. Chicago : Dept. of Photoduplication, J. Regenstein Library, University of Chicago, 1975. 28 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

   278.   St. Anne's Parish, Michilimackinac, Parish Register. (Microfilm M-533. microfilm.  Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   279.   (1992 July). Star Tribune , p. 17.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"
Mongols need their own culture, their own history--recorded in their own hands.  Or else they'll face the fate of American Indians [sic]..." Huhehada, leader of the Inner Mongolia underground movement, as quoted by New York Times writer Nicholas D. Kristof

   280.   (1994 January). Star Tribune, p. 1.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
in the Sunday, January 9, 1994 issue of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, there was a front page article about Indian-owned Casinos.  The newspaper reported that Minneapolis B.I.A. Area Director Earl Barlow, got caught selling his influence in gaming regulation, and accepting vouchers for gambling money and jackpots at the casinos he was supposed to regulate.  The  Star Tribune also observed that the National Indian Gaming Commission does not allow its staff to gamble in Indian casinos, and quotes Fred Stuckwisch, the Commission's Executive Director, as saying "I guess any [gambling] machine can be rigged under the right circumstances."

   281.   (1994 January). Star Tribune, p. 8.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Laber's colleague Dr. Jim Iverson explained in a subsequent telephone conversation that the B.C.A.'s gene frequency database was compiled largely from a commercial blood center in south Minneapolis.  The socio-economic conditions are such that there is a significantly higher ratio of Aboriginal Indigenous people to Indians among the population who frequently sells their blood, than in the Indian reservation population in Minnesota, i.e. the inbreeding among Métis and Euro-Indians is even more pronounced than Dr. Laber observed.

   282.   (1994 January). Star Tribune, p. 24.

   283.   (1994 January). Star Tribune, p. 6.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   284.   State Bar Establishes Committee on Indian Law. (1994). The Michigan Bar Journal, 73(7), 637.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   285.   . (1984). State/Indian government relations . [Minn.] : State Planning Agency.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11672827. "August 1984."

   286.   The State of Minnesota vs. Prairie Island Indian Community. (1997). Gaming Law Review, 1(4), 599.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   287.   The State of the Act...  (1991). Hamline Law Review, 14(12), 427.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: The Indian Child Welfare Act in Minnesota After In the Matter of the Welfare of B.W. and In the Matter of the Welfare of M.S.S.

   288.   State v. Holthusen. 113 N.W. 2s 180, 261 Minn. 536.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   289.   (1992). [Recording].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." A collection of folktales and stories told in Stockbridge Munsee/Mahikan with English translations.

   290.   (<1968). [Filmstrip].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "A set of nine filmstrips covering all areas of the United States."

   291.   . (1990). Studies in Wisconsin's Native American history : an anthology of undergraduate research  . Eau Claire, Wis.: The University.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search)
Abstract: Preface by James W. Oberly. Essays prepared by senior history majors in the historiography course at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire during the academic year 1989-90. "Spring 1990." Origin and courses of the Chippewa-Dakota conflict : an economic perspective of war and peace during the French era / by R.J. Schorr --Restoration of the Lac Courte Oreilles Indians' lost land : the controversy over the relicensing of the Lac Courte Oreilles Hydroelectric Dam from 1971 to 1987 / by J. Wilson -- Who set the path of souls? : Ojibwa spirituality and the results of Christianity in the Lake Superior area, 1760-1890 / by K. Krueger --Cultural imperialism through education : Commissioner Thomas J. Morgan and the Indian schools at the La Pointe Agency / by G.J. Peterson -- Quest to civilize the Native American : a comparative look at Wisconsin Indians and the English language / by A.J. Scharstrom. Includes bibliographies. Chippewa population estimates, 1665-1980 / by B. Downey -- Hochungra people : the Winnebago family of Black River Falls, 1875-1940 / by M.L. Burke -- Birth to burial : an analysis of the family life of the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibway, 1870-1940 / by J.A. Krahulec -- Impact of the treaty-making process on the political structure of the Winnebago Indians, 1825-1832 / by R.R. Garrett -- Give and take : a history of the treaties of 1837, 1842, and 1854 with the Lake Superior Chippewas / by E. Bergman -- How Congress threw Indian tribal government into chaos : Lac Courte Oreilles and Menominee / by C. Larson

   292.   (1975). National Indian Education Association, Minneapolis, Minn.
Notes: ERIC NO: ED200376
Abstract: Focusing on the Johnson O'Malley Act (JOM) and its relationship to subsequent laws, this report on the financing of Indian education in public schools examines the allocation and use of JOM funds for basic educational costs and for supplementary programs, as well as the mixes of local, state, and federal tax revenues available to school districts with Indian students. One section covers the legislative history of several laws on federal funding for Indian education: JOM; Public Law 874 and Public Law 815 (together known as Impact Aid); the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title I; the Indian Education Act, Title IV; and the Indian Self- Determination and Education Assistance Act (Public Law 93- 638). Other sections discuss: property tax as a source of funding for public schools on or near reservations; JOM funds; supplementary federal programs (including suggestions from Indian parents and fiscal data); and plans in 10 states for financing Indian education. Included are 8 conclusions and 14 recommendations. Appendices contain excerpts from the work requirements for this report, a seven-page bibliography, comments from the Affiliated Tribes chairman, and Indian leaders in New Mexico, Alaska, and Minnesota, and excerpts from a fact sheet by the Red Lake Education Task Force. (AN)

   293.   Summary report of Indian Health Service Program operations in the state of Minnesota. (1974).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12149476. Title from cover. "Revised July 1974."

   294.   A survival gene backfires. (the Ojibwa-Cree Indians and other aboriginal peoples have a greater susceptibility to Type II diabetes). (1997). Maclean's, 110(9), 58-59.
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: An inherited survival mechanism common to aboriginal populations in various parts of the world is producing damaging results in a 20th-century environment. In Northern Ontario, doctors are working with Ojibwa-Cree Indians in an effort to address the lifestyle factors that have given the Cree the highest-known incidence in Canada of Type II diabetes. The disease can lead to loss of eyesight, amputation of limbs, kidney and heart problems. Researchers found that 40 per cent of the 728 people studied among the 1,500 residents of the Sandy Lake reserve, 450 km northeast of Winnipeg, are affected by the non-insulin-dependent form of diabetes, with children as young as 10 showing symptoms. Dr. Bernard Zinman, a diabetes expert from Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital, said that the Cree--in common with other aboriginal societies--have a superior ability to store nutrients in their bodies to survive periods of famine. But now that feature, combined with a lack of exercise and a reliance on fastfood products, is making those people more susceptible to obesity--and at risk of diabetes. Zinman's team and other specialists are trying to get the Cree more physically active--and eating less fatty food. In just one example Zinman cites, "we're trying to persuade them to make pizza with low-fat cheese."
Full Text COPYRIGHT 1997 Maclean Hunter (Canada)

   295.   Table of Contents. (1999). Federal Register, 64(21), III-VI.
Notes: Source:  the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr02fe99-118]
Abstract: Indian Affairs Bureau: NOTICES
Restoration of lands to Indian Tribes: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians of Minnesota, 5069-5072
Land Management Bureau: NOTICES …
Restoration of lands to Indian Tribes: Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians of Minnesota, 5069-5072

   296.   (1978). Tewaterihwarenia':Tha  [Tewaterihwarenia':Tha (Caughnawaga) Tewaterihwarenia'Tha] (Vols. [Vol. 1, no. 1] (May 1978)-). Caughnawaga, Quebec : Kanien'keha:ka Otiohkwa [Kanien'kehaka Otiohkwa. Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa Cultural Center].
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Title from cover. Issues for 1979-1982 have title:  Tewaterihwarenia'tha.

   297.   . (1988). Through Dakota eyes : narrative accounts of the Minnesota Indian War of 1862  . St. Paul : Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 16831541

   298.   (1988). [Audiovisual].  St. Paul, Minn.  William Mitchell College of Law.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 18157213. Other: William Mitchell College of Law. American Indian traditions and wisdom.
Abstract: Program presented at William Mitchell College of Law, March 30, 1988

   299.   Thunderbird legend of the post. (1930). Wisconsin Archeologist, 9, 128-129.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   300.   Transcript of public hearings : American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Public Law 95-341 : Offices of Minnesota Chippewa Tribe : Cass Lake Facility Center : Cass Lake, Minnesota : June 11-12, 1979. (1979).
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19081058.  Cover title. Transcript of consultation meeting held for the U.S. Task Force to Implement the American Indian Religious Freedom Act.

   301.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Photographed on the Red Lake Indian Reservation.   Shows the decline of the Indian culture."

   302.   Trempealeau, Wisconsin : a little history. (1978). Trempealeau, Wis.  Trempealeau County Historical Society.
Notes: "Published in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of Perrot State Park." Includes bibliographies. A natural history of Trempealeau, Wisconsin / Deborah K. Bua - - The Native American in the Trempealeau area / Deborah K. Bua -- The history of Trempealeau, Wisconsin / Margaret M. Truax.

   303.   Tribal Seasons: At the Mille Lacs Indian Museum, Richard Rummel illuminated a path through history and tradition for the Minnesota Historical Society. (1998). LD + A, Lighting Design + Application, 28(29), 30.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   304.   (1964). Twin City Indian News//Twin Cities Indian News  (Vols. Vol. 1, no. 1 (Aug. 1, 1964)-). Minneapolis, Minn.  Community Health and Welfare Council of Hennepin County, Bureau of Indian Affairs Area Office.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24562280. Title from caption.   Other: Community Health and Welfare Council of Hennepin County. United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Minneapolis Area

   305.   United States Constitution.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   306.   United States Statutes at Large.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   307.   United States v. Anglin & Stevenson [(1944, CA 10 Okla) 145 F2d 622, cert den 324 US 844,
89 L Ed 1405, 65 S Ct 678.]
.

   308.   Unratified Treaties, 1821-65. (Microfilm Series T-494. microfilm.  National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   309.   Volume 25, Indians. (1987). Code of Federal Regulations Revised April 1, 1987 ed., ). Washington, D.C.: Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Administration.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   310.   (1984). Wahbung Ogi Chi Daw, IKWAY = Tomorrow's Leaders, WOMAN (Vols. Vol. 1, no. 3 (Feb. 1984)-v. 3, no. 4 (Jan. 1986).). St. Paul, Minn.  Red School House.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 16382692. Alt Title: Tomorrow's leaders, WOMAN IKWAY Wahbung ogi chi daw (1983). Other: Red School House (Saint Paul, Minn.).

   311.   War, Laws of. (1948). Encyclopedia Americana Vol. 27 (p. 429). New York: Americana Corporation.

   312.   (1911). Warroad Pioneer Warroad, Minn.  Widsten & Moorhead.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Description based on: Vol. 15, no. 2 (Sept. 7, 1911).

   313.   (1897). Warroad Plaindealer (Vols. -v. 14, no. 52 (Aug. 24, 1911). Began in 1897). Warroad, Roseau County, Minn.  Book & Sanders.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 36 (June 1, 1899).

   314.   Webster's New College Dictionary. (1988).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   315.   Webster's New World Dictionary. (1988).
Notes: Cited in: Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   316.   Webster's New World Dictionary, College Edition. (1957).  World Publishing Company.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   317.   White Earth Land Settlement Act, Public Law 99-265. (1986).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[codified as 100 U.S. Stat. 64]

   318.   White Earth, Minn., St. Columba Parish Papers, Praish [sic] Register, 1853-1933. (MN-107. microfilm.  Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   319.   White Earth Record Newspaper Excerpts. (1993). North Central North Dakota Genealogical Record, (56), 3.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

   320.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:97), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Adequate study of the harvesting of wild rice."

   321.   Williams: The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest. (1991). Michigan Law Review, 89(6), 1719.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   322.   (1992). [Recording].  Milwaukee, Wis.  Milwaukee Public Library.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  "Compiled by Milwaukee Public Library Staff and funded by an LSCA grant." A collection of folktales and stories told in Winnebago with English translations.

   323.   The Winnebago finds a friend, 1878- 1978. (1978). Black River Falls, Wis.  Winnebago United Church of Christ, Winnebago Indian Mission.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Cover title. Most text in English, some in Winnebago.

   324.   Winnebago United Church of Christ, 1974. (1974). Black River Falls, Wis.  Winnebago Indian Mission.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search).  Cover title. Most text in English, some in Winnebago.

   325.   Winneboujou. (1930). Wisconsin Archeologist, (9), 130.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   326.   Wisconsin 2nd Shuns Middle of Road. (1992). Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report, 50(41), 3288.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Rep. Klug, a maverick Republican freshman faces, Deer, an activist of Indian heritage.

   327.   (1995). Wisconsin Native American Heritage Tourism Initiative Annual Report (Vols. 1995-). Lac du Flambeau, Wis.  Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  Title from cover. On cover, 1995- : Native Wisconsin.

   328.   Wisconsin's Resource Wars. (1990). Dollars & Sense, 161, 9.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: In the northwoods of Wisconsin, Kennecott Copper Corp. is twisting arms to win the right to construct an open-pit copper mine on treaty lands of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians. Opposing the mine is a coaltion of Chippewa and environmentalists. The stakes are high, and the battle is heating up.

   329.   Wisconsin Woodland Indians units. (1983). Rhinelander, WI: Rhinelander School District.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 10863061.   Other: Rhinelander School District (Wis.) Wisconsin Woodland Indian Project.
Abstract: Curriculum units written for the Wisconsin Woodland Indian Project of the Rhinelander Public Schools and developed through a grant from Title IV-C Elementary Secondary Education Act and the Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction with assistance from the Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc. and Wisconsin Indian Tribes. Includes bibliographies. [1] The Ashinabe. Ojibway Indian tribe. The history of the Wisconsin Ojibway tribe: Bad River Band. Lac Courte Oreilles Band. Lac du Flambeau Band. Mole Lake Band. Red Cliff Band. St. Croix Band. -- [2] The history of the Hochungra people (Winnebago tribe). Menominee Indians. Oneida Indians. Potawotomie Indians. Stockbridge-Munsee tribe -- [3] What is an Indian? Clans. The elders. Education in the American Indian World -- [4] Indian dwellings. Names and maps tell a story of Wisconsin. Rocks and people. Travel and migration among the American Indians - - [5] American Indian foods -- [6] Ceremonial pipes of the American Indians. American Indian dance costumes. Eagles. Music of the Woodland Indians -- [7] Art -- [8] The bone game. The moccasin game. La Crosse.

   330.   (<1968). [Film].
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:96), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "The daily life of the Chippewa family is observed in this film.  The activities are authentically reproduced in this look at Woodland Indians before the coming of the white man.'

   331.   85th Congress, S. S. H. o. R. Report No. 2489.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   332.   Aadalen, S. P. (1983). An examination of parent coping in survivors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: implications for the education of health and human services professionals. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: Sudden unexpected death of an infant or child is crisis for family systems, communities, and health and human services professionals.  The Double ABCX Model of family adjustment post crisis tested with SIDS family systems and methodology for developing the SIDS Parent Coping Inventory (SPCI) are presented. Coping patterns identified are: (1) Activity; (2) Reflection; (3) Seek Support; (4) Accept Support and Manage Emotions by (5)  Individual Activity; (6) Intra-Family Communication and Support;  (7) Stoicism; and (8) Faith ((alpha) = 92-.71). Data are generated in two empirical inquiries: (1) secondary source records review of birth, death certificates (451 identified SIDS victims, Minnesota 1976-1980) and (2) inventory study (85 mothers, 61 fathers). The incidence rate is higher for Blacks (5.6) and Native Americans (7.2)  than for Caucasians (1.6). Significant differences (p = .05) are found between SIDS population and all families giving birth in Minnesota during the study period on variables (1) infant birth weight; (2) maternal age; (3) maternal education level; and (4) marital status at infant birth. The sample is different (p = .05) from SIDS population for 4 of 20 variables: (1) race; (2) birth order; (3) autopsies performed; and (4) marital status. Null hypotheses of no difference in parent coping patterns by socio-demographic characteristics and post crisis variable, time, are tested. Study has implications for (1) reconceptualizing SIDS family system crisis, coping and adaptation over time; criteria selection for professional education curriculum; and (3) extending the multidimensional framework to practice of health and human services professionals. Needed research includes (1) study replication; (2) conceptual clarification of theory related bereavement and coping with loss; and (3)  identification of the nature relationship(s) between coping; and (a)  family socio-demographic status at infant death and (b) post crisis variables.

   333.   Aamot-Snapp, E. W. (1995). When Judicial Flexibility Becomes Abuse of Discretion: Eliminating the "Good Cause" Exception in Indian Child Welfare Act Adoptive Placements. Minnesota Law Review, 79(5), 1167.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   334.   Abbott, K. A. (1999). Alcohol and the Anishinaabeg of Minnesota in the Early Twentieth Century. The Western Historical Quarterly, v 30(n 1), 25.
Notes: Source:  UnCover
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: A regional study of the drinking habits of the Anishinaabe Native Americans of Minnesota in the early-twentieth century shows that not all Anishinaabeg drank alcohol in a destructive manner. The Anishinaabegs had a complex relationship with alcohol, with some drinking informally while carrying out other activities and others using saloons for intra-tribal socializing. The drinking habits of American Indians should be studied in historical and cultural contexts taking into account regional and tribal drinking patterns.

   335.   Abbott, K. A. (1997). A history of alcohol as a symbol and substance in Anishinabe culture, 1765-1920 (prohibition, Ojibway, Native Americans). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Massachusetts.
Abstract: This dissertation examines the history of alcohol among the Anishinaabe (also known as the Ojibway or Chippewa) people from the middle of the eighteenth century until the enactment of National Prohibition in 1920. As early as the eighteenth century, alcohol was an integral part of the gift-giving which preceded negotiations for the French--and later British and Americanfur trade. Some Anishinaabe people incorporated alcohol into funerals, and there is also evidence that the Anishinaabeg had reasonable social controls around drinking into the twentieth century. Alcohol was also pivotal in shaping non-Indian stereotypes of Indian people. In the nineteenth century, the drinking habits of the Anishinaabeg were seen first as a sign of cultural weakness. The rhetoric of American missionaries emphasized that once the Anishinaabeg had accepted Christianity, they would choose to give up alcohol. However, these same missionaries also argued that in order to become Christian, the Anishinaabeg first would have to reject liquor. By the early twentieth century, the stereotype of the culturally inferior Indian combined with scientific racism to create the image of racially inferior Indians. These images served as the justification for Anishinaabeg dispossession in the early years of the twentieth century. Further, as Prohibition agitation increased in the early twentieth century, non-Indians used the Anishinaabeg in Minnesota to wage an ideological war not only about alcohol in white society but also about the extent of federal power in enforcing treaty provisions on non-Indians lands. Hence, the Anishinaabeg became the rhetorical vehicle for a complex debate which at times only marginally included them. By focusing on one Indian group at a particular point in time, this dissertation seeks to historicize one Indian group's experience with alcohol and to move away from generalizations about 'Indians' and drinking. By presenting as full a picture as possible of the diversity of the Anishinaabe experience with alcohol, this dissertation hopes to emphasize both their humanity and their history.

   336.   Abbott, L. Education for the Indian, keynote address. Lake Mohonk Conference .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   337.   Abbott, P. J. (1998). Traditional and Western Healing Practices for Alcoholism in American Indians and Alaska Natives. [Review] [95 Refs]. Substance Use & Misuse, 33(13), 2605-2646.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The American Indian and Alaska Native population is a culturally diverse population with a current census of 1,959,000. Prior to White contact, there was historically little use of alcoholic beverages except for American Indians in the Southwest. After White contact, use and misuse of alcohol escalated rapidly; however, the prevalence, patterns, and problems of drinking alcoholic beverages vary enormously even in tribes closely linked geographically. American Indians and Alaska Natives have preserved and revitalized a number of traditional healing practices and applied these to the treatment of alcohol-related problems. These healing practices include the following: nativistic movements, sacred dances, sweat lodges, talking circle, four circles, and cultural enhancement programs. Additionally, Western treatment approaches have been applied in the treatment of problems related to alcohol, such as medication for detoxification, disulfiram (Antabuse), Alcoholics Anonymous, and behavioral interventions. Several investigators have completed a small number of naturalistic follow-up studies, but no one has undertaken a randomized controlled trial looking at specific methods of alcohol treatment in American Indians or Alaska Natives. American Indian and Alaska Native communities have adapted and integrated both Traditional and Western approaches to fit their own unique sociocultural needs.  (95 Refs)  (Abstract by: Author)

   338.   Abel, K. (1996). The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780 to 1870 - Peers,L. American Historical Review, 101(2), 594-595.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

   339.   Ablon, J. (1964). Relocated American Indians in the San Francisco bay area: social interaction and Indian identity. Human Organization, 24, 296-304.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:0001)

   340.   Acland, J. R. (1996). The native artistic subject and national identity: a cultural analysis of the architecture of the Canadian Museum of Civilization, designed by Douglas J. Cardinal. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Concordia University (Canada).
Abstract: The Canadian Museum of Civilization (CMC) was constructed as a national-popular symbol which would unite a multicultural society. Described as a 'Global Village', CMC was designed to appeal to the 'cultural tourist' of the 21st century. To this end, a marketing strategy was keyed to the Canadian interest in the mythical qualities of the Land. As a museum whose characteristic features have been its 'Indianness', the dissertation seeks to understand why a conflation of these two idioms, Land and 'Indianness', is seen to appeal to Canadians at this postmodern moment. The role of Douglas Cardinal, architect of the Museum, is examined in terms of his effect as a Canadian of Blackfoot, Metis, and German ancestry. Both the formal qualities of the architecture and its signification as a symbol of national identity are considered. This is shaped through an analysis of the iconography of the architecture in relation to traditional Native spiritual symbolism in order to construct a narrative surrounding the Museum which is identity specific. Primary source site visits and interviews were an integral aspect of the dissertation. My observations were developed and structured through the epistemological current of critical theory in anthropology, art history and cultural studies, drawing particularly on theories of postcolonial discourse and identity. Essentially the dissertation explores the relationship between the artistic subject, expressive form and the problematic of signification in relation to a symbol of national identity.

   341.   Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, I. A. W. D. C. (1985 November). [Letter to Tribal Government Services, to all Area Directors]. Washington, D.C.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   342.   Adam, L. (1875). Esquisse d'une grammaire comparé de le langue des Chippeways et de la langue des Crees. International Congress of Americanists, Proceedings, 1(2), 88-148.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1)  [record #0002]

   343.   Adam, L. (1877). Examen grammatical comparée de seize langues américaines. International Congress of Americanists, Proceedings, 2(2), 161-244.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1)  [record #0003]

   344.   Adam, L., 1833-1918. (1876). Esquises d'une grammaire comparee des dialectes cree et chippeway. Paris: Maisonneuve.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), "Title vignette: Congres international des Americanistes, Nancy -1875. Offprint from Compte rendu of the 1st session of the Congres, v. 2 (p. 89-149). Bibliographical footnotes."

   345.   Adams, G. F. (1878). Commercial fishing in Northern Ontario. Canadian Geographic (Canada), 97(1), 62-69.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0004]

   346.   Adams, I. (1970). The Poverty Wall. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0005]

   347.   . (1829). J. Q. Adams (President of the United States), Indian treaties - Chippeways, Winnebagoes, Pattawatimas, &c. message from the President of the United States, transmitting copies of treaties concluded with the Chippeway, Menomonie, Winnebago, and Pattawatima tribes of Indians . Washington : Gales & Seaton, printers.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   348.   Adams, L. M. (1997). A geographic information systems based predictive model for Native American archaeological sites at Fort McCoy, Monroe County, Wisconsin . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Wisconsin--La Crosse.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

   349.   Adams, W. R. (1989). Fission, maintenance and interaction in an Anishinabe community on Keweenaw Bay, Michigan, 1832-1881. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: The Anishinabe (Ojibway) Community on the Keweenaw Bay fissioned in 1832 when a Methodist missionary entered the community to evangelize them. The schismatic faction established their own community three miles west of the Methodist mission on the opposite side of the bay. The arrival of a Catholic missionary to the western community cemented the existence of the two communities on the Keweenaw Bay in spite of external pressures to reunite them. The two have developed distinctive economic and social patterns. Today, one hundred forty-four years later, the two communities remain as virtually autonomous communities even though they share a single tribal council. This work examines the social history of the two communities from 1832 to 1881. It attempts to understand why the community fissioned in the manner it did and how the two daughter communities have remained distinct entities when external pressures were exerted to integrate them. Four of the primary theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists to understand community dynamics--ethnicity, factionalism, macro-micro analysis, and state penetration--alone and in any combination--were unable to adequately resolve the questions posed. I argue that these models focus either on internal dynamics  (ethnicity and factionalism) or external pressures exerted upon a community (macro-micro analysis and state penetration). To fully understand the fission and subsequent evolution of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, I argue it is necessary to consider both internal forces and external pressures and how they interacted. Equally, it is necessary to understand that groups of individuals, comprising distinct segments of the population, responded to these forces and pressures differently. Their responses to these conditions resulted in the fission of a single community and subsequent dual-community structure.

   350.   Agostini, H. T., Yanagihara, R., Davis, V., Ryschkewitsch, C. F., & Stoner, G. L. (1997). Asian Genotypes of JC Virus in Native Americans and in a Pacific Island Population: Markers of Viral Evolution and Human Migration. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 94(26), 14542-14546.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The human polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the central nervous system demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Previously, we showed that 40% of Caucasians in the United States excrete JCV in the urine as detected by PCR. We have now studied 68 Navaho from New Mexico, 25 Flathead from Montana, and 29 Chamorro from Guam. By using PCR amplification of a fragment of the VP1 gene, JCV DNA was detected in the urine of 45 (66%) Navaho, 14 (56%) Flathead, and 20 (69%) Chamorro. Genotyping of viral DNAs in these cohorts by cycle sequencing showed predominantly type 2 (Asian), rather than type 1 (European). Type 1 is the major type in the United States and Hungary. Type 2 can be further subdivided into 2A, 2B, and 2C. Type 2A is found in China and Japan. Type 2B is a subtype related to the East Asian type, and is now found in Europe and the United States. The large majority (56-89%) of strains excreted by Native Americans and Pacific Islanders were the type 2A subtype, consistent with the origin of these strains in Asia. These findings indicate that JCV infection of Native Americans predates contact with Europeans, and likely predates migration of Amerind ancestors across the Bering land bridge around 12,000-30,000 years ago. If JCV had already differentiated into stable modern genotypes and subtypes prior to first settlement, the origin of JCV in humans may date from 50,000 to 100,000 years ago or more. We conclude that JCV may have coevolved with the human species, and that it provides a convenient marker for human migrations in both prehistoric and modern times.

   351.   Aguar, Jyring & Whiteman-Planning Associates, Aguar, C. E., Trygg, J. W., & Clark, J. W. (1963). Tourist and recreational resources, Grand Portage Indian Reservation, Minnesota. Bloomington, Minn..
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0008], listed as: Grand Portage Indian Reservation, Minnesota, tourist and recreational resources
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23098447 ... accession: 19414698. "This report was written by Charles E. Aguar with the collaboration of J. William Trygg and James W. Clark."  Other: Aguar, Charles Edwin, 1926- Trygg, J. William, 1905-1971. Clark, James W., 1893- Recreational resources, Grand Portage Indian Reservation, Minn.
Abstract: Report of a professional planning agency from a study commissioned by the US Department of the Interior, BIA.  Available through the firm of Aguar, Jyring, Whiteman and Moser of Duluth, Minnesota.

   352.   Agurell, S., Holmstedt, B., & Lindgren, J. E. (1969). Metabolism of 5-Methoxy-N,N-Dimethyltryptamine-14c in the Rat. Biochemical Pharmacology, 18, 2771-2781.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: This paper reports the metabolic pathways of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-14C and assesses the importance of 6-hydroxylation as a metabolic pathway in the rat after the I.P. injection of 5 mg./kg.

   353.   Ainse, J. (1892). Expedition to Wisconsin and Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Collections, 12, 84-91.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:1) [record #0009]

   354.   Ainsworth, L. (1985). History and the imagination: Gerald Vizenor's The people named the Chippewa. American Indian Quarterly, 9(1), 49-54.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   355.   Akao, S. F. (1984). Biculturalism and barriers to learning among Michigan Indian adult students. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between biculturalism and barriers to learning among Indian adult students in Grand Rapids, Michigan. One group of Indian adult students and one group of Anglo adult students comprised the final sample of 84 in this study. Self-administered questionnaires were collected over a period of 10 weeks. Twenty-four percent of the sample was contacted for a follow-up interview. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted with the .05 level of probability set as the level of statistical significance. The biculturalism scores indicated that Indian adult students were moderately bicultural or able to balance both the Indian and Anglo cultures.  Biculturalism scores of Indian adult students were negatively related to situational barriers. The data indicated that the development of biculturalism may be a direct key to improving learning among Indian adults. A profile analysis on learning barriers indicated that situational, dispositional, and institutional barriers were of equal importance for both Indian and Anglo adult students. Significant differences were noted between Indians and Anglos on situational,  institutional, and learning barriers as a whole. Indian adult students assigned more importance to situational, institutional, and to learning barriers overall than did their Anglo counterparts. No significant difference was noted between Indian and Anglo adult students on dispositional barriers. Comparisons of specific barriers within each category indicated that factors of distance, lack of time to study, and lack of transportation were of equal importance and of more importance than lack of child care for Indian adult students. In comparison, all four situational barriers were of equal importance for Anglo adult students. Both groups also indicated that, among the dispositional barriers, lack of confidence in their ability to learn was of greatest importance. Data revealed that the 12 institutional barriers designated in this study were of equal importance for both Indian and Anglo adult students. Finally, relationships between biculturalism, barriers to learning, and demographic characteristics were examined. Recommendations for program improvement in adult education and future research with Native Americans were discussed.

   356.   Al-Khaldi, M. R. (1998). Other narratives: representations of history in four postcolonial Native American novels (Denton R. Bedford, James Welch, Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University.
Abstract: Ever since its emergence as a mode of critical and cultural analysis, postcolonial theory has been generally marked, as many have indicated, by its avoidance of American culture. This avoidance has been justified by reference to the United States's early independence from England compared with other British colonies, or to its development into an imperialist power, or both. This line of reasoning, however, ignores the fact that the founding of the United States has been made possible through the subjugation and dispossession of the original inhabitants of North America. Given Native Americans' condition of internal colonization in the United States, Native American novels, as a major tributary to Native American literature, are worthy of consideration in postcolonial culture studies. This study proposes to demonstrate the postcolonialism of the Native American novel by analyzing representations of history in four novels: Denton R. Bedford's Tsali (1972), James Welch's Fools Crow (1986), Louise Erdrich's Tracks (1988), and Linda Hogan's Mean Spirit (1990). Chapter 1 reviews the definitions of postcolonialism formulated by some of the prominent postcolonial theorists and critics. It synthesizes a working definition for the purpose of this study, and explains the analytic approach adopted in this study. Chapter 2 analyzes Bedford's writing of the story of the Cherokee hero, Tsali. Chapter 3 deals with the historical and cultural recovery in Welch's Fools Crow.  Chapter 4 analyzes the depiction of the collapse of the Chippewa society in Erdrich's Tracks. Chapter 5 examines the portrayal of the effects of the U.S. policy on the Osages in Hogan's Mean Spirit.  Chapter 6 sums up the points raised in each of the four novels, and concludes that Native American literature must not be overlooked in postcolonial studies.

   357.   (1982). [Audiovisual]. E. Albinson.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11696663
Abstract: Original workprint, sound is on a separate sound reel tape. Filmed ca. 1937-1965. Ellen Bushman returns with her daughter, Shelly, to her childhood home and recalls her Indian heritage.

   358.   Albright, S. J. (1898). The first organized government of Dakota . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's ! northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

   359.   . (1888). Alden Publishing Company (compiler), Album of History and Biography of Meeker County, Minnesota, containing sketches of the cities, villages, and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; biographies of old settlers and representative men, together with a full history of Meeker County's experience during the famous Indian massacre of 1862. History of Minnesota, embracing an account of early explorations, organization, a review of the political history, and a concise history of the Indian outbreak.  Chicago: Alden, Ogle & Company.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 21022797 ... accession: 20850138 ... accession: 3794805

   360.   Alexander, B. C. (1991). Victor Turner revisited: ritual as social change.  Atlanta, GA: Scholar's Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   361.   Alexander, H. L. (1975). Landes, Ruth.  The Ojibwa Woman [book review]. American Anthropologist, 77(1), 110-111.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXI (1978:216)

   362.   (1995). Deerfield, Mass.: Historic Deerfield, Inc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   363.   Alhamisi, A. A. (1981). Perceptions of teachers toward culturally different students. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Michigan.
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify, measure, and analyze the perceptions of teachers toward culturally different American African, American European, and Native American students. The data for this study were obtained by means of a  researcher-developed instrument and interview schedule. A stratified random sample of 150 teachers was administered the Cross-Cultural Perception Questionnaire (CCPQ) developed especially for this investigation. The CCPQ was pretested and piloted prior to the main study. Data were analyzed through the use of the Michigan Interactive Data Analysis System (MIDAS).  Throughout the study, descriptive and graphic measures, including means, standard deviations, frequency tabulations, histograms, scatter diagrams, and frequency polygons were produced for presentation and interpretation of results and findings. Correlational analysis and t-test statistics were used to compare data to determine substantial relationships and whether differences in mean subtest scores were significant. The .05 level of significance (p < .05) or better was used as the criterion for all statistical tests of significance.  On the basis of the data presented, it appears that although there were some statistically significant differences reported, there were basically minimal differences between the different subgroups of teachers in viewing American African, American European and Native American students. The following are major findings regarding teacher perceptions of culturally different students: (1)The vocational and nonvocational teachers differ (p < .001) in perceptions in such subtest areas as culture, academic skills development, expression of ideas and feelings, and values orientation in viewing Native American students. (2)There is a fairly strong relationship of .84 (p < .01) between male teachers' perceptions of American African students and American European students in such subtest areas as culture, academic skillsdevelopment, expression of ideas and feelings, and values  orientation. (3)There is a moderately strong relationship of .81 (p < .01) between American African teachers' perceptions of American African students and American European students in such areas as culture, academic skills development, expression of ideas and feelings, and values orientation. Further analysis of exploratory data suggested a need to view teachers in terms of their cultural orientation and the cultural realities of their environment.

   364.   Allanson, G. G. (1922). G.G. Allanson writes of Indian outbreak : relates interesting reminiscences of his boyhood and describes how grandmother's presence of mind saved her party . Wheaton, Minn.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession:: 23362154

   365.   Allanson, G. G. (1862). Stirring adventures of the Joseph R. Brown family ; Their captivity during the Indian Uprising of 1862 and description of their old home near Sacred Heart -- destroyed by the Indians. Wheaton (Minn.) : Wheaton Gazette.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8145031. Cover title. Caption title: A segment of Minnesota History ; Privations and hardships that befell one of those pioneer families who paved the way for the present generation, written by Geo. G. Allanson, Wheaton, Mn. Published in the Wheaton Gazette. Cuts furnished through courtesy of Minnesota State Historical Society.

   366.   . (1958). J. AllenJournal and letters of Lieutenant James Allen Schoolcraft's Expedition to Lake Itasca . East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0011]

   367.   . (1846). J. Allen, 1806-1846Letter from the Secretary of War, transmitting the report, journal, & map of Capt. J. Allen, of the 1st regiment of dragoons, of his expedition to the heads of the rivers Des Moines, Blue earth, etc. in the northwest, in compliance with a resolution of the House of Respresentatives of the 29th of January, 1845 . Washington DC : Government Printing Office?
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 8209816. At head of title: Captain J. Allen's expedition. Other: Captain J. Allen's expedition. Report of an expedition into the Indian country, August to October, 1844.

   368.   Alliance Franco-Americaine du Midwest. Association of the French of the North (Red Lake, Minn.) (Ed.). (1985). Les Francais D'Amerique ... : Un Calendrier D'Histoire, De Dates, Et D'Activites Culturelles Pour L'an ... = French in America ... : a Calendar of Important Dates and Cultural Activities for ... [French in America ...] (Vols. Began in 1985). Chicago, Ill. : Red Lake Falls, Minn.  Alliance Franco-Americaine du Midwest (AFAM) ; L'Association des Francais du Nord (AFRAN) = Association of the French of the North.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 37728247. Description based on: 1997; title from cover.

   369.   Allison, H. (1987). Tragic Saga of the Indiana Indians.  Turner Publishing Company.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   370.   Allison, K. J. (1994). Psychological, cultural and gender crises: perception of identity in Louise Erdrich's 'Love Medicine'. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Texas Woman's University.
Abstract: Love  Medicine emphasizes the significance of perception through a tripartite quest for identity: for psychological identity which involves the traditional exploration of self; for tribal identity which involves the exploration of the dualities of Chippewa and western culture; and for gender identity which involves the acceptance of male or female cultural behavior patterns. Success and survival require characters to weave together these three strands of identity. To the extent that the characters can see themselves clearly in each of these domains, they succeed. To the extent that they cannot, they fail. Of these three parts of the quest, that for gender identity appears to be paramount, pervading and even superseding the characters' psychological and tribal identity quests.

   371.   . (1665). S. J. Allouez (Father).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   372.   Ambler, M. (1996). Biology with an Ojibwe component. Tribal College : Journal of American Indian Higher ..., 7(4), 28.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

   373.   American Genealogical Lending Library. (1996). AGLL microform catalog. Bountiful, Utah : AGLL, Inc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  Alternate titles: A.G.L.L. microform catalog American Genealogical Lending Library microform catalog Microform film & fiche catalog AGLL microform/fiche catalogs.
Abstract: Some vols. lack title pages. v. [1]. U.S. general: institutions, military installations, U.S. possessions, United States -- v. [2]. U.S. census, 1790- 1920 -- v. [3]. Military records -- v. [4]. Ship passenger lists -- v. [5]. Surname and family histories -- v. [6]. Special collections [Corbin manuscripts, African American, Native American], foreign -- v. [7]. New England: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont -- v. [8]. New York -- v. [9]. Pennsylvania -- v. [10]. Mid Atlantic: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey -- v. [11]. Virginia, West Virginia -- v. [12]. North Carolina, South Carolina -- v. [13]. Georgia, Florida -- v. [14]. Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi -- v. [15]. Kentucky, Tennessee -- v. [16]. Ohio -- v. [17]. Indiana -- v. [18]. Illinois -- v. [19]. Upper Plains, Upper Midwest: Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin -- v. [20]. Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska -- v. [21]. Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas -- v. [22]. Western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Hawaii, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming -- v. [23]. Canada.

   374.   American Genealogical Lending Library. (1998). AGLL microform catalog. Bountiful, Utah : AGLL, Inc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search).  Alternate titles: A.G.L.L. microform catalog American Genealogical Lending Library microform catalog Microform film & fiche catalog AGLL microform/fiche catalogs.
Abstract: Some vols. lack title pages. v. [1]. U.S. census, 1790-1920 -- v. [2]. Ship passenger lists -- v. [3]. Military records -- v. [4]. United States fiche collection -- v. [5]. U.S. general: institutions, military installations, U.S. possessions, United States -- v. [6]. Family histories and surname -- v. [7]. North Carolina, South Carolina -- v. [8]. Florida, Georgia -- v. [9]. Western states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Hawaii, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming -- v. [10]. Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska -- v. [11]. Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas -- v. [12]. Illinois -- v. [13]. Indiana -- v. [14]. Ohio -- v. [15]. Kentucky, Tennessee -- v. [16]. Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi -- v. [17]. Virginia, West Virginia -- v. [18]. Pennsylvania -- v. [19]. Mid Atlantic: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey -- v. [20]. New York -- v. [21]. New England: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont -- v. [22]. Upper Plains, Upper Midwest: Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin -- v. [23]. Canada -- v. [24]. Special collections [Corbin manuscripts, African American, Native American], foreign.

   375.   (1994). [VHS videorecording]. American Indian Awareness Month. (6th : 1994 : St. Cloud State University), & P. White, Little Otter Drug Group , & St. Cloud State University. Learning Resources Services. St. Cloud, Minn.  St. Cloud State University.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 00-38317635.  Recorded May 3, 1994, at St. Cloud State University.
Abstract: Porky White, a spritual leader of the Anishinabe Nation, blesses the month with a Pipe Ceremony to begin the 6th Annual American Indian Awareness Celebration. The Little Otter Drum Group then performs.

   376.   American Indian Fellowship Association (Ed.). (1983). Newsletter (American Indian Fellowship Association)  (Vols. -Sept. 1983. Description based on: Feb./Mar. 1983). Duluth, Minn.  American Indian Fellowship Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13067686. Title from cover.

   377.   American Indian Language and Culture Pilot Projects. (1981). Organizational characteristics of Minnesota American Indian language and culture education projects : a cooperative study .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7890287

   378.   American Indian Lawyer Training Program. (1988). Indian Tribes as Sovereign Governments. Oakland, CA.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   379.   American Indian Policy Review Commission. Final Report, Submitted to Congress May 17, 1977.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   380.   American Scientific Corporation. (1963). Creation of new industries on the Turtle Mountain reservation for Turtle Mountain Agency, Belcourt, North Dakota. Alexandria, VA: American Scientific Corporation.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0013]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:30)

   381.   (1998). (Report No. ERIC NO: ED425306). Minnesota State Dept. of Children, Families, and Learning, St. Paul.
Abstract: This document consists of a 1996-97 final report of Youth Works*AmeriCorps (YW*AC) and a supplemental report with information collected by the Minnesota Department of Children, Families, and Learning. The final report provides information on the third year of collaboration among the Minnesota Commission on National and Community Service, individual YW*AC programs, and University of Minnesota Evaluation Team across five reporting areas: demographic profile of Members, services provided to the state, impact of service on members, efforts to improve capacity for self evaluation and reporting within programs, and cost benefit analysis. Positive results are cited: Minnesota has a diverse, gender-fair, well-educated corps; services to Minnesotans are increasing each year; the service experience continues to have a significant impact on members; and programs continue to operate in a cost-effective manner. The second report provides material on the Minnesota Commission on National and Community Service, describes service program partners, and profiles YW*AC. It includes overviews of the following YW*AC programs: Minneapolis Public Schools/Community Education; St. Paul Future Force; Minnesota Conservation Corps; Minnesota Department of Economic Security: MN Serve; Multicultural Communities in Action: Neighborhood House; Pillsbury Neighborhood Services; Partners in Service to America: Red Lake Tribal Council; Southern Minnesota YW*AC; Twin Cities Youth and Housing Initiative; Volunteers in Service to America; and national AC programs for seniors, K- 12, and higher education. (YLB)

   382.   Andersen, M. N. E., 1891- . (1953). A cursory study of Red Lake Indian Reservation on administration, resources & activities . [Bemidji, MN] : [Andersen].
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Copy in Spec Coll. is carbon copy of typescript; copy in Gen Coll. is photographic copy of carbon copy. Bibliography: leaves 1-8 (2d group)

   383.   Anderson, D. D. (1962). John Disturnell introduces the Great Lakes to America. Inland Seas, 18, 96-106.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0014]

   384.   Anderson, D. H. (1973). Communication linkages between Indian communities and school districts in Wisconsin. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.

   385.   Anderson, E. F. (1980). Peyote, the divine cactus.  Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   386.   Anderson, G. C. (1997). Kinsmen of Another Kind: Dakota-White Relations in the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1650-1862.  Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   387.   Anderson, G. C. (1996). Sitting Bull & the Paradox of Lakota Nationhood.  Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   388.   Anderson, H. (1980). Recalling, reliving, reviewing : creation theologies in the Dakota-Lakota, Judeo-Christian, Ojibwe and Winnebago traditions.  Native American Theological Association.
Notes: Source: ATLAReligion electronic database (Fall, 1999 search)
Abstract: A religious dialogue sponsored by the NATA and the Minnesota Humanities Commission in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities, Oct 8-13, 1979, in Minneapolis. Contents: Notes of the conference. Appendix: participants. The Gospel according to John (Bible study). The Torah: Five Books of Moses; a new translation (Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia, 1962): Genesis (Priestly) creation story. Ojibwe creation myths [Kitche Manitou (Great Spirit)], recorded by Basil Johnston. Winnebago creation story, by Mitchell Whiterabbit. The Lakota creation story, by Leonard Crow Dog. Evaluation, by Anthony Genia

   389.   Anderson, I. (1978). Memories of an Indian dance . [Brooklyn Center?, Minn.] : Brooklyn Historical Society.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 7663986. Cover title. Signed: Ike Anderson.   Other: Hallberg, Jane. Brooklyn Historical Society (Brooklyn Center, Minn.)

   390.   Anderson, K. E., Collister, E. G., & Ladd, C. E. (1953). The Educational Achievement of Indian Children.  Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"

   391.   Anderson, M., & Hussey-Arnston, K. (1986). Ojibwe bandolier bags in the collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. American Indian Art, 11(4), 46-57.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXXII (1990:27)

   392.   Anderson, M. (1996). Reinvesting for our children: bittersweet berries. Vital Speeches, 62(11), 351 (2).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Income from casinos has brought a great degree of prosperity to the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Indians. Using casino revenues for community projects instead of handing out direct payments to members of the tribe will help to ensure the future of the younger generation by instilling in them the values of education and hard work.

   393.   Anderson, O. L. (1922). Modern Methusala, 137, passes away at Cass Lake, Minnesota. North Woods, 7(33), 13-15.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0015]

   394.   Anderson, S. (Samuel), 1839-1881. (1877). The North-American boundary from the Lake of the Woods to the Rocky Mountains . Royal Geographical Society (Great Britain). Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, 46, p. 228-262, [1] leaf of plates : map ; 22 cm.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23449506.  Title from caption. "Read, March 27th, 1876." "Map of the north west territory ... surveyed and marked out by the Joint Commission 1872-3-4" 1 leaf in pocket.

   395.   Andrews, K. R. (1995). Shawnee grammer (Algonquian, morphology, Native Americans). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of South Carolina.
Abstract: This work is a descriptive grammar of Shawnee in the Bloomfieldian tradition, based primarily on a reelicited and corrected version of 'Autobiography of a Woman' (Voegelin 1953). The main topics are phonology, grammatical categories, word derivation, and inflectional morphology. Data from Kickapoo, Fox, Plains Cree, Menominee, and Ojibwa are used for comparative purposes. Chapter 1. The Shawnee Language gives an overview of the language and its relationship to other Algonquian languages, its principal linguistic features, the current status of the language and its speakers, and extant materials. Chapter 2. Phonology provides the phonemic inventory, phonological rules, and morphophonological rules. Additional topics are diachronic consonant alternations and initial change. Chapter 3. Grammatical Categories examines gender, number, direction, and obviation as the main grammatical categories of Shawnee that are reflected in the nominal and verbal systems. Chapter 4. Word Formation applies the descriptive scheme of Algonquian stem derivation (Goddard 1990) to Shawnee. Stem compounding of Initials, Medials, and Finals is the principal word formation process for nouns and verbs. Noun roots and stems, noun formatives, diminutivization, dependent/possessed nouns, deverbal nouns, and prenouns are the main topics in noun derivation. A separate category of adjective does not exist. Instead, either verb derivational and inflectional affixes are added to nouns to serve that purpose, or modifiers are inflected verbs. Topics in verb derivation include category changing processes, instrumental and transitivizing affixes, preverbs, directional particles, and verb finals. Invariant particles are categorized as adverbs, postpositions, or interjections based on their meaning, function, and distribution. Chapter 5. Noun and Pronoun Inflection provides the composition of the nominal stem and the principal inflectional categories of the noun (gender, number, and obviation). The section on pronouns examines personal and reflexive pronouns, demonstratives, indefinite pronouns, and interrogative pronouns. Chapter 6. Verb Inflection also provides the composition of the verb stem and the distribution and grammatical function of affixes. Chapter 7. Major Findings concludes with the significant contributions of this study.

   396.   Andrist, R. H. (1951). Where the wild rice grows. Readers Digest,  121.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0016]

   397.   Anfinson, S. F. (1997). Southwestern Minnesota Archaeology: 12,000 Years in the Prairie Lake Region.  Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   398.   Angel, M. R. (1988). Discordant voices, conflicting visions: Ojibwa and Euro-American perspectives on the Midewiwin. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Manitoba (Canada).
Abstract: According to Anishinaabe tradition, the power to promote, restore and prolong life was a gift which had been given to their forefathers in times past by Nanabozho when he had taken pity on their sufferings. Mide elders with special healing powers passed on teachings concerning right living, the properties of special herbs and roots, and associated prayers, songs and dances to be used for ceremonies. Candidates were initiated into the Midewiwin society in a ritual drama which centred around the 'shooting' of the initiate with a sacred shell or miigis. Mide leaders were respected and feared by other members of the Anishinaabeg since the powers thus obtained could be used both to aid and to harm other individuals. Euro-American accounts of the Midewiwin, or Grand Medicine Society, have focused primarily on the initiation rituals of the ceremony itself. The earliest surviving written accounts were created to impress audiences with the exotic nature of the rituals, which were often felt to be inspired by demonic forces. Succeeding generations of Euro-Americans documented the ceremonies in more detail, believing that such 'primitive' practices would shortly die out as the Anishinaabeg became acculturated. Most Euro-American studies have focused on the Midewiwin as practiced at a particular time and place, rather than considering the Midewiwin within the wider context of Anishinaabe culture. This study demonstrates how the conflicting visions of Anishinaabe practitioners and Euro-American interpreters have resulted in widely divergent views of the same institution. The focus is on the Midewiwin as practiced by Ojibwa groups in the nineteenth century, since this was the formative period for Euro-American beliefs regarding the Midewiwin. However, the study also places the Midewiwin within the context of the broader Anishinaabe world-view, and traces some of the changes to the Midewiwin that occurred both among the Ojibwa and their Anishinaabe neighbours. Based on these analyses, it is clear that the Midewiwin is an Aboriginal institution, although over the years it has adopted some Euro-American concepts. These adaptations, along with other changes made to meet new situations, reflect new visions, and are consistent with the fact that its teachings have been non-exclusivist and oral in nature. Euro-American attempts to categorize only certain Midewiwin beliefs as 'orthodox,' or seek to identify some 'true' Mide beliefs and practices, misunderstand the diversity that is at the very heart of the Anishinaabe world-view.

   399.   Angell, G. B. (1997). Madness in the Family: the 'Windigo'. Journal of Family Social Work, 2(2), 179-196.
Notes: Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search. (23 Ref)
Source: Family Studies database [University of Minnesota onlinedatabase], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: This paper looks at a particular Native American narrative used to explain problems in biopsychosocial functioning. Specific to the Cree, Ojibwa, and other Algonkian speaking peoples, the windigo is seen as the underlying force behind things that go wrong in life, from bad luck to mental illness. Centered outside of the individual, the windigo effectively separates the person from the problem and serves as a means to not only explain behavior and functioning but to give meaning and empower the individual.  (23 ref)

   400.   Annis, R. C., & Corenblum, B. (1986). Effect of Test Language and Experimenter Race on Canadian Indian Children's Racial and Self-Identity. Journal of Social Psychology, 126(6), 761-774.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The influence of test language and experimenter race on Indian children's racial preferences and self-identity were examined. Construct accessibility theory predicts that cues such as the experimenter's race and the test language used would prime race and race-related constructs, making them more accessible for processing race-related information.  Both the escape and light-color bias hypotheses predict (for different reasons) that minority-group children should identify with and show a preference for white children.  To test these ideas.  Canadian Indian children living on an isolated Indian reserve were asked by a white or Indian experimenter who spoke English or Ojibwa to answer questions about their racial preferences and identity.  Subjects responded by pointing to a picture of a white or Indian boy or girl.  Results indicated that subjects misidentified which picture looked most like themselves, findings consistent with the escape and light-color bias hypotheses.  Although subjects' racial preferences showed a strong white bias, more own-race preferences occurred when subjects were tested in Ojibwa, a finding consistent with construct accessibility theory.  The results were discussed in terms of sensitivity to racial self-identity and in relation to the presence of in-group and out-group cues.

   401.   [Anon]. (1997). nikotqasik-iskwahtem-paskihtepayih! Studies in honour of H.C. Wolfart - English, Cheyenne, Fax, Montagnais, Ojibwe - Nichols, J. D., Ogg, A. C. FOLIA LINGUIST , 31(1-2), 218.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   402.   [anon], Sugarhead, C., & O'Meara, J. (1997). Ninoontaan/I Can Hear It - Ojibwe Stories From Lansdowne-House written by Cecilia Sugerhead - English, Ojibwe - O’Meara, J. Folia Linguistica, 31(1-2), 218-219.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   403.   anonymous. (1986).
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[text]:
FIRST ANNUAL INDIAN SHOOT
TIME:   Early spring, beginning of walleye run
PLACE:  Northern Wisconsin lakes
RULES:  Open shoot, off hand position only, no scopes, no sling, no tripods, and no whiskey for bait!
 OPEN TO ALL WISCONSIN TAXPAYING RESIDENTS
                Residents that are BLACK, HMONG, CUBAN or those on WELFARE, A.D.C., FOOD
                STAMPS or any other GOVERNMENT GIVE-A-WAY program, are not eligible.  (Don't
                complain about discrimination, you'll have your own shoot later!)
SCORING: Wisconsin rules apply. Point system will be used.
PLAIN INDIAN...................................5 POINTS
INDIAN WITH WALLEYES..........................10 POINTS
INDIAN WITH BOAT NEWER THAN YOURS.............20 POINTS
INDIAN USING PITCHFORK........................30 POINTS
INDIAN WITH HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA...............50 POINTS
SOBER INDIAN..................................75 POINTS
INDIAN TRIBAL LAWYER.........................100 POINTS
(Does not have to be spearing)
JUDGES:  Governor Tommy Thompson, Rev. Jesse Jackson
PRIZES:  Fillet-O-Fish sandwiches and six packs of treaty beer
SPONSOR: Society Helping Individual Taxpayers Own Nothing
(Known as SHIT ON)
ENTRY BLANK:
 I ________________________________ will attend shoot
 I _____ will _____ will not be taking scalps.
 I BELIEVE SENATOR ROSHELL IS:
 ____ HONEST    ____ CORRECT    ____ ACCURATE    ____ A SAINT
 ____ ALL OF THE ABOVE
  I am enclosing $______ for his re-election

Bumper stickers reading "SAVE A FISH--SPEAR AN INDIAN" only $5.00 each. "T"
shirts with same message only $10.00 each.
[distributed in Medford, Wisconsin]

   404.   anonymous. (Forbidden history. personal papers of Maynard Swan. manuscript.  Maynard Swan's residence, Pine Point, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
There have been few writers of African mixed-blood history, and much of these peoples' history remains to be written.  One writer of what she calls her ancestors' Maroon history, in an anonymous manuscript, "Forbidden History," notes that "by 1650 Mexico alone had an African-Indian [sic] population (some with white ancestry) of one hundred thousand."  She adds, "theirs is a story worth remembering and worth teaching our children."

   405.   Anonymous. (1978). Gold Award: Providing Psychiatric Care and Consultation in Remote Indian Villages--Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. Hospital & Community Psychiatry, 29(10), 678-680.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Faculty of the University of Toronto department of psychiatry take several trips a year to remote Indian villages in northwestern Ontario to deliver care to the Cree and Ojibway people and to provide consultation and training to the service delivery providers in the area. The program is part of a larger medical program operated by the university and financed by the Canadian government. Psychiatrists face numerous cultural and language obstacles in addition to harsh weather conditions and limited means of communication in the vast Sioux Lookout zone. When they are back in Toronto, they keep in touch via two-way radio with professional staff in the zone for ongoing consultations.

   406.   Anonymous. (1998). Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration and the Indian Health Service--FDA Notice. Federal Register, 63(135), 38182-38188.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and the Indian Health Service (IHS). The purpose of the MOU is to develop a more cohesive relationship to mutually address American Indian and Alaska Native issues within the context of each organization's jurisdiction.  (Abstract by: Author)

   407.   Anonymous. (1970). More Lessons From Red Lake. Lancet, 2(7666), 251-252.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

   408.   Anonymous. (1998). Perch fish farm may help Red Lake band. Aquaculture Magazine (Asheville);  24(5), 109-110.
Notes: Source: Fish & Fisheries Worldwide database [University of Minnesota onlinedatabase], August 29, 1999 search

   409.   Anonymous. (1993). Redesignation of Contract Health Service Delivery Area--Indian Health Service, HHS. Final Notice. Federal Register, 58(63), 17602-17603.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: This notice advises the public that the Indian Health Service (IHS) is redesignating the geographic boundaries of the Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) for the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians ('The Band'). The Grand Traverse CHSDA was comprised of Leelanau County in Michigan. This county was designated as the Band's CHSDA when the IHS published its updated list of CHSDAs in the Federal Register of January 10, 1984 (49 FR 1291). The redesignated CHSDA is comprised of six counties in the State of Michigan, i.e., Leelanau, Antrim, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Manistee, and Charlevoix. This notice is issued under authority of 43 FR 34654, August 4, 1978.  (Abstract by: Author)

   410.   Antell, W. D. A survey of the economic and social conditions on the Red Lake Indian Reservation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Mankato State College, 1964 .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

   411.   Antell, W. (1973). William Warren. Minneapolis, MN: Dillon Publishers.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:2) [record #0017]

   412.   Antle, A. (1997). Ethnic Perspectives of Cancer Nursing: the American Indian. Oncology Nursing Forum, 14(3), 70-3.
Notes: Source: Biomed (Cinahl) electronic database, Fall 1999 search. (24 Ref)

   413.   Archabal, N. M. (1977). Frances Densmore: pioneer in the study of American Indian music. in B. Stuhler, & G. Kreuter (editors), Women of Minnesota: selected biographical essays  (pp. 94-115). St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0019]

   414.   Arlee, J. (1998). Over a Century of Moving to the Drum: Salish Indian Celebrations on the Flathead Indian Reservation.  Montana Historical Society Press.
Notes: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   415.   . (1966). D. A. Armour (editor), Massacre at Mackinac, Alexander Henry's travels and adventures in Canada and the Indian Territories between the yearsw 1760 and 1764 . Mackinac Island: Mackinac Island Press.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0020]

   416.   . (1892). B. G. ArmstrongEarly life among the Indians: reminiscences of Benj. G. Armstrong: treaties of 1835, 1837, 1842, and 1854: habits and customs of the red men of the forest: incidents, biographical sketches, battles & c.  Ashland, WI: A. W. Bowron.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0021]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:30)

   417.   Armstrong, B. G. (1971-1972). Reminiscences of life among the Chippewa [part I]. Wisconsin Magazine of History, 55, 172-194, 287-309.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0022]

   418.   Armstrong, B. G. (1972-1973). Reminiscences of life among the Chippewa [part II]. Wisconsin Magazine of History, 56, 37-58.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0023]

   419.   Armstrong, J. M. (1996). Uncivilized women and erotic strategies of border zones or demythologizing the romance of conquest (Louise Erdrich, Anishinabe, Erna Brodber, Jamaica, Julia O'Faolain, Ireland, Lucha Corpi, Mexican-American, women characters). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Arizona.
Abstract:  The contact of two different cultures in the colonization process  produces a zone of cultural mingling that resembles Victor Turner's concept of 'liminality' referring to states or persons that elude classification. This study considers the repercussions of colonization on the lives of women characters in novels about four different 'post-colonial' contexts--Native American, Jamaican, Irish and Mexican American. These novels reflect both the unique historical circumstances of each context and common themes that occur due to colonization and transcend the specific cultures such as the mourning of personal and collective loss, liminal states of consciousness and mingling of cultures. The introductory chapter examines the particular historical contexts of each novel and the  theories of Abdul JanMohamed and Frantz Fanon on colonization. This study also applies the work of Victor Turner, Mary Douglas, Julia Kristeva, Gloria Anzaldua, Homi Bhaba and others to an  examination of the subversive cultural formations that evolve through the boundary dissolution of colonization. Chapter two considers Louise Erdrich's novel Tracks in which the decimation of the Anishinabe people is the context for the three primary characters  who have experienced personal and collective loss and respond by resisting or adapting to colonization. Chapter three examines Erna Brodber's Myal and the impact of the manichean colonial ideology on a Jamaican woman who is literally half-black and half-white.  Chapter four addresses Julia O'Faolain's No Country for Young Men, a novel about two women, one who lived through the early twentieth century movement for Irish independence and the other who is her great niece, that have both been silenced and sexually controlled by colonialism and Irish Catholicism. The fifth and final chapter examines Lucha Corpi's Delia's Song about a young Chicana activist who has suffered losses on several levels and recovers by writing an autobiographical novel that weaves the personal and political issues of her life. All four novels are concerned with the liminal states of consciousness in these women characters and their efforts to both find love and tell their stories, thus counteracting the colonizer's version of history.

   420.   Armstrong, P. A. The Sauks & the Black Hawk War.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   421.   Arnold, E. L. (1998). The Ojibwa Woman (Review). NWSA Journal, 10(i3), 233 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Two recent publications by the University of Nebraska Press--one a reprinting of an ethnographic study of a small community of Ojibwa women conducted in the 1930s, the other a new history of Cherokee women in the pre-Removal Southeast--offer contrasting but complementary approaches to the expanding study of the women of Native North America. The two books are also valuable resources in the ongoing project of documenting women writing and rewriting both Native and Euro-American history and culture.  Ruth Landes was a doctoral student in anthropology at Columbia, studying under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, when she began fieldwork in 1932 among the Ojibwa on the Minnesota-Ontario border to collect data for classical studies of Ojibwa sociology and religion. According to anthropologist Sally Cole's informative new introduction to The Ojibwa Woman, it was Landes' informant Maggie Wilson, a bilingual Scots-Cree woman in her fifties who had lived her entire life among the Ojibwa, "who directed Landes to the possibilities that gender offered as a theoretical domain," resulting in the 1938 publication of this "important early contribution to the anthropology of gender" (x). In Landes' words, The Ojibwa Woman "was designed to investigate, against the whole background of an alien culture, the moot problem of men and women" (Foreword). Maggie Wilson, a respected artist, herbalist, midwife, and visionary, dictated to Landes orally and in letters transcribed by her niece more than one hundred life stories of Native women that formed the core of The Ojibwa Woman, leading Cole to term it a collaborative work (vii). Wilson's personality and the lively quality of her speech are preserved in lengthy excerpts from her stories.  The book's first four sections--"Youth," "Marriage," "Occupations," and "Abnormalities"--provide, according to Landes, "analytic accounts of the cultural situations and of the ways in which women are expected to meet them." Part Five, "Life Histories," shows "how the typical Ojibwa requirements interweave to interrupt and reinforce one another in the actual existence of individual women" (227). Ojibwa culture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as it is described in these accounts placed a high value on individualism and prescribed a gendered division of labor. Males were rigorously prepared for a "glamorous course" (177) of hunting, warfare, and shamanistic practice and secured the raw materials that women manufactured into products. While man's work was "appraised culturally as infinitely more interesting and honorable" (131), women's roles were less regulated by tradition and their work more varied. Though Ojibwa women were expected to be passive and dependent, the stories that fill this book portray them as individuals actively constructing their own lives. Many were warriors, athletes, hunters, and shamanistic healers; typically they survived starvation, abuse, abandonment, and deaths of children and husbands with great resourcefulness and independence. For example, while some widows remarried and preserved conventional gender roles, others chose to remain independent through the practice of "masculine" skills. Cole's introduction establishes the importance of storytelling to Ojibwa women like Maggie Wilson for creating a sense of community and opportunities to pass on to other women the skills and knowledge that could enable autonomy in a culture that idealized men's roles (xii). While evidence of cultural disruption by colonization and the fur trade abounds in these stories, Landes makes no attempt to analyze or contextualize historical influences; her interest is in the individual negotiation of cultural constraints. According to Cole, "Landes understood culture to be located in the interstices between formalist rules and individual behavior" (xi).  Landes' book is most valuable in the context of Sally Cole's ongoing research into Landes' life and work. In her essay "Women's Stories and Boasian Texts" (1995, 3-25), Cole describes Landes as a pioneer of gender theory whose theoretical innovations defied the androcentrism and relativism of the Boasian paradigm, even while conforming to its ahistorical approach. Landes focused on the individual, on conflict and contradiction, at a time when anthropology emphasized cultural coherence and cooperation and tended to project idealized gender roles onto Native women (1718). The reprinting of The Ojibwa Woman offers an intimate look into the lives of Native women in a specific time and place; in the context of Cole's analyses of the critical reception of Landes' work, it also provides an important opportunity to examine the processes of marginalization of women's work in the history of anthropology.  ...
Ellen L. Arnold, a doctoral candidate in Emory University's Institute of the Liberal Arts, is a Lecturer in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at Appalachian State University. Her field of study is Culture Studies with an emphasis on Native American Studies. Her interests include women's studies, literature and science, and ecocriticism. She is currently completing her dissertation entitled, "Reworlding the Word: Contemporary Native American Novelists Map the Third Space."

   422.   Arnold, E. (1954). Broken Arrow. Des Moines, Iowa: Duell, Sloan and Pearce.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "The story of Cochise, an Apache Chief, and an American scout, Tom Jeffords, who developed a friendship which led them to become blood brothers.  Grades 6-9."

   423.   Arrow, I. (1970). Industrial parks in Indian areas: a guide for businessmen. Washington, D.C.: Arrow, Inc.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0024]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:30)

   424.   Arteshaw, M. (1910). Crawling stone lake. Red Man, 3, 80.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   425.   Askin, J. (1910). Letters to fur traders at Montreal, Detroit, and on Lake Superior. Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 19, 263, ff.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0025]

   426.   Asmussen, J. M. (1976). Visual-motor perception of Sioux and Chippewa children and normative population on the Bender Gestalt test using the Koppitz scoring system. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, May 1977.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:3) [record #0026]

   427.   Assiniwi, B. (1971). Anish-nah-be: contes adults du pays algonkin. Montreal: Leméac.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0027]

   428.   Map of the country between Red River & Lake Winnipeg on the east and the elbow of the South Saskatchewan on the west.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 8519530
Abstract: Relief indicated by hachures. Facsimile of 1858 ed. Includes vegetation.

   429.   . (1860). Associate Mission for MinnesotaThe Indian mission at work  . Faribault, Minn.  Holley & Brown.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14628270

   430.   Associated Press.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[quoting the Turtle Mountain B.I.A. superintendent]

   431.   Astrov, M. L. T. K. (1946). The Winged Serpent: An anthology of American Indian prose and poetry. New York: The John Day Company.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0028]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:30)

   432.   Atkins, A. (1987). Night flying woman: an Ojibway narrative (1983) by Broker, Ignatia [book review]. Journal of American Ethnic History, 7, 129-130.
Notes: Source: Women's Resources International, Women Studies Abstracts [University of Minnesota online databases], August 1999 search

   433.   Atkins, A. M. (1981). 'Everything but the mortgage': the response to agricultural disaster in Minnesota, 1873-1878. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Indiana University.
Abstract: Five successive years of grasshopper infestations in southwestern Minnesota in the 1870s left crops destroyed and farm families in acute need. This study examines the social response to this disaster and sheds light on the larger issues of rural life and social welfare in the late-nineteenth century. This dissertations rests on close analysis of the state governors' papers, records of the legislature and of the various relief organizations, as well as personal papers in the Minnesota Historical Society; congressional records; army and entomological commission records in the National Archives; tax, mortgage, and commissioners' records in Martin and Chippewa Counties; newspapers; and the reminiscences of Minnesota pioneers. Individual settlers responded with an optimism fueled by faith and misunderstanding. Farmers tried to will the insects away, and newspapers tried to write them away. When the grasshoppers proved impervious to these efforts, some farmers took their families and their search for prosperity elsewhere; others stayed out of necessity or sheer bewilderment. They mortgaged their lands and personal property, fought with the feeble weapons of smudge pots and hopperdozers, but to survive they turned to friends, relatives, county, state, and federal governments--anyone who would lend a hand or a dollar. County governments, faced with poverty-stricken settlers and staggering tax delinquency, could do little more than appeal to outsiders. Private citizens responded generously, but inadequately, to these appeals. It remained to the state government to offer the bulk of the help. State officials treated the disaster victims with suspicion bordering on hostility--a response usually  reserved in the nineteenth century for the 'unworthy poor.' State legislation mandated elaborate investigations and means tests. State officials assumed that the ineligible would exploit the state's generosity and that too much aid too easily obtained would corrupt the recipients. The state offered money, food, clothing, and seed,  but demanded payment in humiliation. The federal government, in a  nearly unprecedented gesture of generosity, appropriated funds for seed, allowed the army to distribute military supplies, and formed the United States Entomological Commission. These piecemeal efforts did not prevent or alleviate all of the suffering, but did blunt  the worst effects of this severe and prolonged disaster, while saving many a settler from 'starving on his government claim.'

   434.   Atwater, C. (1831). Remarks made on a tour to Prairie du Chien: thence to Washington City, in 1829.  By Caleb Atwater, late Commissioner employed by the United States to negotiate with the Indians of the Upper Mississippi for the purchase of mineral country. Columbus, OH: I. N. Whiting.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0029]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:30)

   435.   Aubin, G. F. (1992). Comments on "A Pocket Vocabulary of Terms Alphabetically Arranged, 1822". Papers, Algonquian Conference, 23, 1-11.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   436.   Aubin, G. F. (1994). Look at the Ojibwa vocabulary of Baudry des Lozières. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 25, 1-12.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   437.   Aubrey, I. E. (1978). Animals in Canadian children's books (Livres Canadiens sur les animaux pour les jeunes).
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0030]

   438.   Aubry, C. (1983). The magic fiddler, and other legends of  French Canada [Violin magique et autres legendes  du Canada francais]. Toronto, Canada : C. Irwin.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search), Translation of: Le violon magique et autres  legendes du Canada francais. The magic fiddler -- The Caughnawaga bell -- Rose Latulippe -- The legend of Perce Rock -- La Corriveau -- The witch  canoe -- The porpoises of Riveere-Ouelle -- Loup-garou -- Pilotte -- The tree of dreams.  Field, Saul, 1912-

   439.   Austin, J. H. (1900). Indian legends of the Pipestone Quarries, Pipestone, Minnesota. Pipestone, Minn.  Published by J. H. Austin. Dealer in Indian Pipestone curios.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19891249. Cover title.

   440.   Avers, C. J. (1984). Genetics.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   441.   Ayer, E. (1996). Chippewa Reservoir Project. Hydro Review, 15(3), 36.
Notes: Source: UnCover
Abstract: An Innovative Settlement Agreement.

   442.   Ayer, F. (1894). Frederick Ayer, teacher and missionary to the Ojibway Indians, 1829-1850. Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, 6, 429-437.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0031]

   443.   Babbitt, F. E. (Frances Eliza), 1824-1891. (1881). Red Lake notes . Bulletin of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences, 2(3), 86-101.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29237744.  Title from caption.
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)

   444.   Babbitt, F. E. (1894). Illustrative notes concerning the Minnesota Odjibways. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Proceedings, 36, 303-307.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0032]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:31)

   445.   Babcock, W. M. (1940). Mille Lacs, battle of. in J. T. Adams (editor), Dictionary of American History  (pp. 404-405). New York: Scribner's.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0034]

   446.   Babcock, W. M. (1954). The Minnesota Indian and his history. Minnesota Archaeologist, 19(3), 18-25.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0035]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:31)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search: Reprinted from the January 9, 1932 issue of "The Minnesota Alumni Weekly"

   447.   Babcock, W. M. (1925). Sioux versus Chippewa. Minnesota History, 6, 41-45.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   448.   Babcock, W. M. (1946). William Whipple Warren and his Chippewa writings. Minnesota Archaeologist, 12, 40-44.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   449.   Babcock, W. M. (1962). With Ramsey to Pembina, a treaty-making trip in 1851. Minnesota History, 38, 1-10.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0036]

   450.   Babcock, W. M., Jr. (1924). Major Lawrence Taliaferro, Indian Agent. Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 11(3), 358-375.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0033]

   451.   Babcock, W. M. (Willoughby Maynard), 1893-1967. (1934). A great Minnesota pioneer, Henry Hastings Sibley - pioneer, fur trader, congressman, territorial governor of Minnesota, Indian fighter. Faribault, Minn.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19331939. Extracted from the Companion, vol. 60, no. 4, p. 1-4, no. 5, p. 1-4; Nov. 8, 22, 1934. "A paper read ... at a meeting of the Rice County Historical Society."

   452.   Babcock, W. M. (Willoughby Maynard), 1893-1967. (1962). Minnesota's Indian war. Minnesota History, 38, 93-[98] illus.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19320975

   453.   Babcock, W. M. (1925). Radiograms of Minnesota history. Sioux versus Chippewa. Minnesota History, 6, 41-45.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   454.   Bader, T., & Barnouw, V. (1954). Reminiscences of Chippewa Mide priest [recorded by Victor Barnouw]. Wisconsin Archeologist, 35, 83-112.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   455.   Bagley, C. B. (1991). Indian Myths of the Northwest.  Native American Book Publishers.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   456.   Bailey, G. A. (1973). Hickerson, H.  The Chippewa and their neighbors: a study in ethnohistory [book review]. American Anthropologist, 75(2), 418-420.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIX (1975:56)

   457.   Bailey, L. W. (1937). The conflict of European and eastern Algonkian cultures. New Brunswick, NJ: New Brunswick Museum Publications.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0037]

   458.   (1987). N. BaileyNational Film Board of Canada.
Notes: Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women, Race & Ethnicity Database], August 29, 1999 search
Abstract: Part of the "Daughters of the Country" four-part dramatic series, this film opens in 1770, when Ikwe, A North American Indian girl, is traded to a Scottish trader by her father. Fleeing from him later, she returns to her village, only to find it ravaged by smallpox. In Ojibwa with English sub- titles; some English dialogue.

   459.   Bailin, A., & Grafstein, A. (1991). The assignment of thematic roles in Ojibwa. Linguistics, 29(3), 397.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   460.   Baird, E. T. (1898). Reminiscences of early days on Mackinac Island, 1810-1825. Wisconsin Historical Collections, 15, 17-63.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0038]

   461.   Baird, R. (1993). Going Indian" In And Around Dances With Wolves. Michigan Academician, 25(2), 133.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   462.   Baker, B. (1958). The Shaman's last raid. New York: Harper and Row Publishers.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Great-grandfather visits a pair of twins and a TV company comes to shoot an Indian picture at the same time.  Hilarious complications arise in this story about a modern day Apache family.  Grades 3-7."

   463.   Baker, B. A. (1997). A nation in two states: the Annishnabeg in the United States and Canada, 1837-1991 (Chippewa, Ojibway). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Stanford University.
Abstract: The Chippewa and Ojibway bands of the Lake Superior region of the United States and Canada share the same historical and cultural nexus (best characterized as Annishnabeg). Although the Annishnabeg share a distinct ethnic identity that stretches across the Canada/U.S. border, they have existed under the influence of two dissimilar institutional regimes. When the U.S. and Canada expanded in the Lake Superior region in the 19th century, treaties served as the vehicle by which the Annishnabeg were politically incorporated by each country. Because the Annishnabeg bands on both sides of the border maintained hunting and fishing rights to the treaty regions that were created, their ethnic identity was entrenched in the institutional regime of each country. However, the specific manner in which the Annishnabeg have enacted those claims in both the historical and contemporary periods has been different in each county. I argue that the dissimilarities in the reorganization of Annishnabeg ethnic identity are rooted in the differences in the institutional regimes between these two countries. The study utilizes qualitative evidence to explain the national differences in the reorganization of Annishnabeg ethnic identity. The research is grounded in theories of the nation-state, internal colonialism and ethnic mobilization. For the historical period (1837-1916), I establish differences in the structure of internal colonialism at the national and sub-national levels in each country with respect to Annishnabeg hunting and fishing rights. For the contemporary period  (1972-1991), I focus on the different strategies of mobilization employed by the Annishnabeg to reclaim those rights in both countries, which were shaped by differences in the institutionalized political regimes. While the Annishnabeg pursued a strategy of negotiation in Canada, the Annishnabeg in the U.S. pursued a strategy of litigation. While the Annishnabeg in Ontario were unable to produce a shift in the institutional regime, the Annishnabeg in Wisconsin were successful. Comparatively, this difference is explained by the fact that the Annishnabeg have a sovereign status as Indian nations in the United States where treaties are the supreme law of the land.

   464.   Baker, W. 1. (1996). Ancestral File on CD-ROM: an introduction. Melbourne, Vic.: Genie Press.

   465.   Bakker, P. (1994). Is John Long's Chippeway (1791) an Ojibwa pidgin? Papers, Algonquian Conference, 25, 13-31.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   466.   Bakker, P. (1991). Ojibwa element in Michif. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 22, 11-20.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   467.   Baldwin, W. W. (1957). Social problems of the Ojibwa Indians in the Collins area in Northwestern Ontario. Anthropologica, 5(57), 51-124.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. III (1959:3-4506)
Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:4) [record #0039]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:31)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   468.   Bales, C. (1972). Kevin Cloud. Chicago, IL: Contemporary Books, Inc.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0040]

   469.   Balicki, A. (1956). Note sur le midewiwin. Anthropologica, 2, 165-217.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0041]
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   470.   Ball, A. E. (1894). White Earth Consolidated Agency. in United States Census OfficeReport on Indians taxed and Indians not taxed in the United States (excluding Alaska) at the Eleventh Census: 1890  (pp. 339-351). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0042]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:31)

   471.   Total intensity aeromagnetic map of parts of Clearwater, Polk, and Red Lake Counties, Minnesota : relative to arbitrary datum . (1951). Washington, D.C.  United States Geological Survey.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29190176. Includes text and location map.

   472.   Bame, S. I. (1986). Use of health care by urban American Indians in Michigan (medicine, accessibility, cultural affiliation). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Michigan.
Abstract: American Indians tend to use fewer medical services than does the general population, despite a higher level of need, and little is known about the utilization behavior of urban Indians. The purposes of this study are: (1) to identify some of the factors that influence the use of Anglo medical care (AMC) and traditional Indian medical care  (TIMC) among Michigan urban Indians and (2) to determine the relationship between their use of the two systems of health care. The data were obtained from a household survey of Indian families (N = 317) conducted in 1979-80 in urban areas of southeastern and mid-Michigan. Four factors were predicted to influence utilization behavior: need, accessibility of Anglo care, acceptability of Anglo care, and affiliation with Indian culture. Factors associated with AMC use were derived by stepwise regression for a continuous dependent variable, and those associated with TIMC use by stepwise logistic regression. Non-parametric tests of association were used to measure the relationship between using the two systems of care. Only need proved to be associated with the use of AMC, especially in terms of the family as a whole. Accessibility,  acceptability and cultural affiliation were not associated with the use of AMC. If anything, urban Indians seemed to encounter greater inconvenience as their utilization increased. Affiliation with Indian culture was the only factor consistently related to the use of TIMC.  Families with a greater number of cultural attributes were more likely to use at least one mode of TIMC. Furthermore, although need in general was not associated with TIMC use, family members with more bed-disability were more likely to use TIMC. A positive association between use of the two systems of care was predicted,  but it was not supported by the data. The limited availability of TIMC in urban areas may account for limited use of TIMC for therapeutic purposes.

   473.   Baner, J. G. R., & Bellaire, J. I. (1933). Kitch-iti-ki-pi, the 'Big Spring'; wonderfully beautiful (namesakes) ... Manistique, MI: [not published].
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0043]
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:31)

   474.   Baraga, F. (1992). A Dictionary of the Ojibway Language.  Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   475.   Baraga, F. (1976). Chippewa Indians As Recorded by Rev. Frederick Baraga in Eighteen Forty-Seven.  Studia Slovenica, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   476.   Baraga, F. (1970). Zgodovina, znacaj, nravi in sege severnoameriskih Indijancev. Celje: Mohorjeva Druzba.
Notes: Source: Timothy G. Roufs, Working bibliography of Chippewa/Ojibwa/Anishinabe and selected works (1981:5) [record #0044]

   477.   Baraga, F. (1976). Chippewa Indians. New York: League of Slovenian Americans.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   478.   . (1992). F. BaragaDictionary of the Otchipwe language .  Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   479.   Baraga, F. (1853). A dictionary of the Otchipwe language, explained in English. Cincinnati: Jos. A. Hemann.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   480.   . (1878). F. BaragaA dictionary of the Otchipwe language, explained in English Revised ed., ). Montreal: Beaucheman and Valois.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   481.   Baraga, F. (1966). A dictionary of the Otchipwe language, explained in English. Minneapolis: Ross and Haines.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   482.   Baraga, F. (1966). A Grammar and Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language.  Ross and Haines, Incorporated.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"

   483.   Baraga, F. (1850). A theoretical and practical grammar of the Otchipwe language, spoken by the Chippewa Indians; which is also spoken by the Algonquin, Otawa and Potawatami Indians, with little difference.  For the use of Missionaries and other persons living among the above named tribes. Detroit: J. Fox.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   484.   . (1878). F. BaragaA theoretical and practical grammar of the Otchipwe language, spoken by the Chippewa Indians; which is also spoken by the Algonquin, Otawa and Potawatami Indians, with little difference.  For the use of Missionaries and other persons living among the above named tribes Revised ed., ). Montreal: Beauchemain and Valois.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   485.   Barbeau, M., 1883-1969. (1940). Indian trade silver of Canada . Minnesota Archaeologist, 6(4), 121-138, ill.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 14183303. Title from caption. Includes bibliographical references.

   486.   Barber, D. C., Dyke, A., Hillaire-Marcel, C., & et al. (1999). Forcing of the cold event of 8,200 years ago by catastrophic drainage of Laurentide lakes. Nature, 400(6742), 344-348.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   487.   Barnes, W. J. (1978). Distribution of Floodplain Herbs as Influenced by Annual Flood Elevation. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences Arts & Letters, 66(0), 254-266.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Herbaceous plants were sampled in a Chippewa River bottomland forest at Eau Claire, Wisconsin (USA). Spatial dispersion patterns of the herbs were examined in relation to elevation, soil characteristics and flood recurrence intervals. Frequency and magnitude of spring floods may be the major influence on the distribution of herbaceous species in this river bottom site.

   488.   Barnes, W. J. (1997). Vegetation dynamics on the floodplain of the lower Chippewa River in Wisconsin. J TORREY BOT SOC , 124(2), 189-197.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   489.   Barnouw, V. (1950). Acculturation and personality among the Wisconsin Chippewa. Menasha: American Anthropological Association.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 1, item 6
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   490.   Barnouw, V. (1951). Acculturation and personality among the Wisconsin Chippewa. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Columbia University.

   491.   Barnouw, V. Acculturation & Personality among the Wisconsin Chippewa.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   492.   Barnouw, V. (1960). A Chippewa Mide priest's description of the Medicine Dance. The Wisconsin Archaeologist, 41, 77-97.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   493.   Barnouw, V. (1961). Chippewa Social Atomism. American Anthropologist, 63(5, part I), 1006-1013.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. VII (1963:1765)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   494.   Barnouw, V. (1949). The phantasy world of a Chippewa woman. Psychiatry, 12, 67-76.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   495.   Barnouw, V. (1955). A psychological interpretation of a Chippewa origin legend. Journal of American Folklore, 68(268), 211-223 [Tanner says 73-85, 211-223 and 341-345].
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology (1955:I-2019)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   496.   Barnouw, V. (1954). Reminiscences of a Chippewa Mide priest. The Wisconsin Archaeologist, 35, 83-112.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:32)

   497.   Barnouw, V. (1977). Wisconsin Chippewa myths and their relation to Chippewa life. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXIII (1981:232)
Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   498.   Barondess, D. A. (1999). Anthropometric and biomechanical assessment of skeletal structural adaptations in bioarcheological populations from Michigan and Western New York (long bone structure, physical activity, prehistoric, hunter gatherers, agriculturalists). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: This research investigates postcranial skeletal structural adaptations in archaeological populations derived from Michigan and western New York. It accomplishes this by examining differences in long bone structure that may have coincided with changes in physical activity between the prehistoric and historic periods in Michigan. Second, it explores long bone structural differences between groups of hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists in western New York state. Two separate yet complimentary data sets, both of which measure dimensional and architectural characteristics of the femur and humerus, but which are predicated on different methodological approaches, are used. One data set is derived from a whole bone anthropometric analysis of external bone dimensions, the other is derived from a biomechanical analysis of computerized tomographic (CT) scan-generated diaphyseal cross-sectional size, shape andstrength properties. The results of this research demonstrate that there are significant differences in the femoral and humeral dimensions and biomechanical properties between the prehistoricand historic period groups in Michigan. For both males and females, most measures of diaphyseal size are smaller in the historic period. Alternatively, the diaphyses are significantly stronger, arguing for increased biomechanical demand, for both sexes, in the Michigan historic period. The magnitude of the femoral cross-sectional size and strength differences between the prehistoric and historic periods  is generally greater for females than for males, suggesting that the  level of physical activity changed more dramatically for females  between the two periods. For the New York hunter-gatherer and agricultural comparison, the results of the biomechanical analyses do  not argue for any significant increase (or decrease) in workload in one group compared to the other. With the aid of the archaeological record and historical documentation, patterns of physical activity and their potential behavioral correlates within the context of culture contact are examined. Specifically, the influence of the fur trade on Native American subsistence pursuits during the historic period is addressed. Results are evaluated against a broad backdrop of comparable research from other regions of North America, where similar analyses have brought to light the general patterns of skeletal structural adaptation that can be expected from modifications in  physical activity in a wide range of biocultural contexts. Finally, suggestions for future research are proposed.

   499.   Barr, R. N. (1958). Indian health problems in Minnesota: past, present, and future . Minneapolis, [Minn.] : Minnesota Dept. of Health.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 6070092.  Other: Kleinman, Herman. Minnesota. Dept. of Health.

   500.   Barrera, L. C. (1994). The Canadian Metis and the Mexican Mayas: a cross cultural study of native land struggles. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Calgary (Canada).
Abstract: This research focuses on the development of two native social movements during the nineteenth century; the Maya Caste War of Yucatan (1847-1901), in Mexico and the Western Canadian Metis movements known as Riel Rebellions (1869-1885). The analysis concentrates upon the internal elements that created the development of both movements, in order to demonstrate that these movements were not only reactions against dispossession. Central in this study is the idea that before the second half of the nineteenth century these groups were in control of their social organization, and thus were autonomous communities. The movements are shown as struggles to maintain the autonomy and social organization of the Maya and Metis groups. The analysis is based on a combination of primary and secondary sources, taken from Mexican and Canadian archives and libraries.

   501.   . (1979). S. A. BarrettThe Dream Dance of the Chippewa & Menominee Indians of Northern Wisconsin .  Garland Publishing, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   502.   Barrett, S. A. (1911). The dream dance of the Chippewa and Menomini Indians of northern Wisconsin. Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee, 1(part 2), 251-406.
Notes: Source: Human Relations Area Files Index, Category NG6 "[as of July 1, 1975]", identified as "(M)", page 1, item 9
Source: bibliography in Ritzenthaler and Ritzenthaler (1970)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   503.   Baskin, C., & Avalos, C. (1993). Native Traditions in Sexual Abuse Healing. Healthsharing, 13(4), 18.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)
Abstract: Mooka'am means "New Dawn" in Ojibway; it is also the name of an innovative sexual abuse program in Toronto using Native traditions and practices.

   504.   . (1984). J. R. BassettRed pine plantation management in the lake states : a review  . Ann Arbor, Mich.  School of Natural Resources, University of Michigan.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 16921002

   505.   Bataille, G. M. (1987). The Worlds Between Two Rivers: Perspectives on American Indians in Iowa.  Iowa State University Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   506.   Map of the mineral lands, upon Lake Superior ceded to the United States government by the treaty of 1842 with the Chippeway Indians, and the locations made from Aug. 1844 to Nov. 1845.
 IN: Map of the mineral lands upon Lake Superior. (CStRLIN)90B20
. (1846). Detroit: Morgan Bates.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search).  Shows mining leases between Duluth, Minnesota and Marquette, Michigan. "Hall & Mooney lith, Buffalo"

   507.   Bateson, G. (1938). Naven, a survey of the problems suggested by a composite picture of the culture of a New Guinea tribe drawn from three points of view. Cambridge [Eng.] : Cambridge University Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Plates alternate with guard sheets containing descriptive letterpress. Includes bibliographical references.

   508.   Bathrick, N. L. (1983). Language performance of Chippewa Indian children with visual cross dominance compared to Chippewa Indian children without visual cross dominance. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Central Michigan University.

   509.   Bauman, J. (1969). Landes, R. Ojibwa religion and the Midewiwin. [book review]. Journal of American Folklore, 82(326), 375-377.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XV (1971:120)

   510.   Bavington, G. A. (1999). Buchi Emecheta and Ruby Slipperjack: writing in the margins to create home (Ojibwa, Ibo, Nigeria). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada).
Abstract: Ojibway writer Ruby Slipperjack and Ibo writer Buchi Emecheta are both marginalized writers crafting autobiographical fiction while living in exile from their homes of origin. This thesis discusses their individual works as well as some of the new insights and alternative critical approaches such works open up for readers and critics. One chapter is devoted to the issues of language and the ways in which Slipperjack and Emecheta represent their linguistic/cultural backgrounds in their stories written in English. This is a comparative study in the sense of reading disparate traditions in juxtaposition while avoiding a synthesis of them or the reduction of the two traditions into mainstream literature. The literature of Slipperjack and Emecheta is appreciated within the cultural and historical context in which each is written recognizing the limitations of reading and theorizing from outside of the cultural matrix of the authors.

   511.   Beardslee, L. (1998). Awasassi: An Ojibwe Folktale. Cobblestone, 18(8), 30.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

   512.   Beasley, W. P. W. (1991). A comparison of current and former students' satisfaction and involvement in related activities in a Minneapolis magnet school program (Minnesota, minority education). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: The purpose of this dissertation was to compare Summatech Magnet students (grades 11 and 12) and Summatech graduates' (from classes 1985-1989) satisfaction and involvement in related activities. The Summatech Magnet (Mathematics, Science and Technology) was implemented at North Community High School; Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1982 for students in grades 9th-12th. It has maintained fifty (50) percent students of color: African-American/Blacks, Asians, Hispanics, American Indian and other non-white ethnic groups and white students ratio since its inception. The ratio by gender has varied. At the time of this study,  Summatech had been in existence for seven (7) years. The study  targeted one hundred (100) students (fifty undergraduates and fifty high school graduates) with ninety-five (95) percent return. The study took in account such variables as: race, gender, age, home school area, living with status, academic classification and grade point average. The study investigated the impact that the Summatech Magnet had in addressing the issues of: desegregation and integration; urban schooling; educating minorities (students of color); Mathematics, Science and Technology; student satisfaction/climate; and magnets in general. Survey instruments are appended. Data are displayed in tables, charts and appendices. Findings and conclusions are presented. Discussion and recommendations are made.

   513.   . (1971). D. BeaulieuNative American students in standard metropolitan statistical areas : a selective analysis of 1970 census data  . Minneapolis: Training Center for Community Programs, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 11795861. "Training Center for Community Programs in coordination with the Office of Community Programs, Center for Urban and Regional Affairs." Other: Harkins, Arthur M. University of Minnesota. Training Center for Community Programs. University of Minnesota. Office of Community Programs.

   514.   Beaulieu, D. (1991). State of the Art. Indian Education in Minnesota. Change, 23(2), 31.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   515.   Beaulieu, D. L. (1984). Curly hair and big feet: physical anthropology and the implementation of land allotment on the White Earth Chippewa Reservation. American Indian Quarterly, 8(4), 281-314.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   516.   Beaulieu, D. L. (1989). The Minnesota Indian Teacher Training Program. [Minn.] : Minnesota Dept. of Education, Indian Education Section.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23806891. Title from cover. "August, 1989." ... accession: 21135908

   517.   Beaulieu, T. H. (1900). The land allotment question of the Chippewas of the Mississippi on the White Earth Reservation, Minnesota. Detroit, MN: G. D. Hamilton Print.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33), "not listed by NUC, this volume is available at the library of the Minnesota Historical Society"

   518.   Beaulieu, T. H. (1914 April).
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Theodore H. Beaulieu, White Earth, Minnesota: "Minnesota Chippewa Indians who took an active part in assisting the State ..."  photostatic copy of letter dated April 10, 1914.

   519.   Beaulieu's homeseeker's map of the Red Lake Reservation . (1896). [White Earth, Minn.] : T.H. Beaulieu.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

   520.   Beauregard, M. F., 1914- . (1993). Mariages de Saint-Francois-Xavier du  Sault-Saint-Louis : Caughnawaga - Kahnawake, 1735-1972 . Montreal: Societe genealogique  canadienne-francaise.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   521.   Beauvais, F., Oetting, E. R., & Edwards, R. W. (1985). Trends in Drug Use of Indian Adolescents Living on Reservations: 1975-1983. American Journal of Drug & Alcohol Abuse, 11, 209-229.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Drug use by over 10,000 7th to 12th grade students in American Indian reservation schools was studied using an anonymous survey; drugs studied included ethyl alcohol, cannabis (marijuana; I) and inhalants.

   522.   Bechard, H. (1946). J'ai cent ans! L'eglise Saint-Francois-Xavier de  Caughnawaga. Montreal: Le Messager canadien.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   523.   Bechard, H. (1976). The original Caughnawaga Indians . Montreal: International Publishers'  Representatives (Canada).
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)
Includes index. Bibliography: p. [237]-242.

   524.   Beck, D. R. M. (1995). Return to Nama o Uskiwamit: The Importance of Sturgeon in Menominee Indian History. Wisconsin Magazine of History, 79(1), 32.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   525.   Beck, D. R. M. (1995). Siege and Survival: Menominee responses to an encroaching world (Wisconsin). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago.
Abstract: The Menominee Indians, the longest-known residents of Wisconsin, have managed to retain a portion of their homeland and a separate cultural identity despite escalating, centuries-long pressures from expansive alien societies, both non-Indian and Native American. Though their survival has long depended on adaptation to a changing environment, the problems changed dramatically in the seventeenth century, with the French and fur trade induced invasion of their territory. The Menominee readily adapted to the changes, incorporating portions of French material culture into their own culture and recovering from wrenching demographic upheaval. They faced even greater pressures in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from Americans, however, who not only wanted their land and resources, but attempted to destroy their culture as well. This dissertation explores Menominee survival in the context of incursions provoked by the Euro-American invasion. It analyzes political and economic interactions between the Menominee and colonial French and British, eastern Indian tribes, and the United States, who all used various methods to gain access to Menominee resources, first furs, then land, and finally timber. A variety of actors, including traders, soldiers, loggers, farmers, speculators, missionaries, and bureaucrats played key roles for the invading forces. The Menominee not only survived but shaped their future through all this time. Though the Americans essentially destroyed the Menominee economy and usurped nearly all of the political strength of the tribe's leaders, the Menominee stubbornly clung to and fought for their future as they envisioned it. Menominee leaders consistently placed the tribe's best interest ahead of all others, so that although the invading forces caused traumatic and tragic losses, the Menominee not only achieved survival, but retained a strong cultural identity and the ability to shape their own future. They prepared to enter the twenty-first century stronger than they have been since the early treaty-making era.

   526.   ([ca. 1893]). [Ojibwa beaded necklaces. Suspended fiber ornament]. United States Minnesota Becker.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 09-00034381
Abstract: Pink and blue bead necklace has red and gray tassels suspended from it.  Necklace was manufactured by Becker County [Minn.] Indian Industries and exhibited at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Ill.

   527.   ([ca. 1893]). [Ojibwa loom-woven beadwork geometric pattern necklaces]. United States Minnesota Becker.
Notes: Source: PALS Online Catalog (November 1999 search), Bib-Record-Id: 09-00034377
Abstract: Narrow loom-woven beaded chain necklace has a diamond pattern of purple, green and red beads with a white border.  The necklace may be one of several examples exhibited at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Ill.

   528.   Becker, J. S. (1988). Fold roots, new roots: folklore in American life. Lexington, MA: Museum of our national heritage.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   529.   Beckwith, H. W. (1980). The Illinois & Indiana Indians.  Ayer Company Publishers, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   530.   Behr, M. (1977). Indian potential in the wild rice industry .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 22448954. "For the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and The Bureau of Indian Affairs." Bibliography: leaf  87. Other: United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

   531.   Belcourt, G. A.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   532.   Belcourt, G. A. 1. Department of Hudson's Bay. Collectons of the Minnesota Historical Society, 1, 207-44.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33), "reprinted from an earlier publication of the Society"

   533.   Belcourt, G. A. (1944). Baffalo hunt.  Beaver, 275(3), 13-17.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   534.   Belding, N., Woods, R. G., 1933- , & Harkins, A. M. (1969). Evaluation report of the 1968-69 University of Minnesota Cultural Education Specialist and Associate Program: Indian American and Afro-American aspects. Minneapolis: Training Center for Community Programs, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24831245.  Other: Woods, Richard G., 1933- Harkins, Arthur M. University of Minnesota. Training Center for Community Programs. University of Minnesota Cultural Education Specialist and Associate Program. ... accession: 3097450

   535.   . (1926). C. N. Bell (Charles Napier), 1854-1936The earliest fur traders on the upper Red River and Red Lake Minn. (1783-1810) : a paper  . Winnipeg: Saults & Pollard, Limited.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 8058534, accession: 16921177, accession: 21172570, accession: 24644469

   536.   Bellfy, P. C. (1996). Division and unity, dispersal and permanence: the Anishinabeg of the Lake Huron borderlands (Ojibway, Potawatomi). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.
Abstract: Many studies of the indigenous peoples of North America accept a priori modern political boundaries. But, rather than focusing on the Native people of a particular place under a specific political jurisdiction, the present study will look at Native people who were subjected to the policies of two differing political entities and how the imposition of a political boundary through their homeland continues to affect them. The study area comprises all of the borderlands of Lake Huron and its connecting waters. The Native people of the region today are almost exclusively Ojibway (or Chippewa), Ottawa, or Potawatomi, collectively called the Anishnabeg. While division is an obvious theme, the study also will examine the strong links that have served to maintain unity within the Anishnabeg over the period of nearly 400 years of European contact. Common language and culture are obvious links, but the political dimensions of unity will also be explored, as well as the concept of sovereignty as it relates to various autonomous
 Anishnabeg groups. The history of the Anishnabeg is presented from the earliest pre-contact times through the French and British regimes but always striving to maintain the reporting of that history from the indigenous perspective with emphasis on the forces that kept the identity of the people intact and how they successfully resisted removal policies of the two governments. The study culminates in an analysis of over 1,500 names of treaty-signers and names of others found in U.S. and Canadian government documents of the period. The analysis uncovers a surprising number of individuals that appear to have signed treaties for the Anishnabeg with both the U.S. and Canadian governments, which, it is argued, helped them maintain a degree of autonomy and sovereignty in the face of these two alternative hegemonic forces. The study concludes by examining how the Anishnabeg have continued their struggle to maintain their identity throughout the tumult of the 20th century. Jay's Treaty and other cross-border issues are examined within this unifying context.

   537.   Beltrami, G. C. (1828). A pilgramage in Europe and America, leading to the discovery of the sources of the Mississippi and Bloody River; with a description of the whole course of the former, and of the Ohio. London: Hunt and Clarke.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33)

   538.   Bemidji Civic and Commerce Association (Bemidji, Minn.). Tax Committee. (1952). Special study of Indian welfare in Minnesota . Bemidji, Minn.  Bemidji Civic and Commerce Association.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23662529. Title from cover. "February 1952."
Abstract: Study includes Becker, Beltrami, Carlton, Cass, Clearwater, Cook, Itasca, Koochiching, Mahnomen, Mille Lacs, and Saint Louis counties.

   539.   Bemrose, J. (1985). A poison stronger than love: the destruction of an Ojibwa community (book reviews). Maclean's, 98, 52 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search

   540.   Benchley, N. (1964). Red Fox and his canoe. New York: Harper and Row Publishers.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:92), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Red Fox finds that having one of the world's largest canoes has disadvantages when half the forest animals feelthey can ride along.  Grades 1-3."

   541.   Bender, H. (1995). History of Native Americans : east shore of Lake Winnebago : Calumet & Fond du Lac Counties, Wisconsin . Sheboygan Falls, WI : Wisconsin's Ethnic Settlement Trail, Inc.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October 15, 1999 search). Research and writing funded by Fond du Lac Visitors & Convention Bureau [&] Calumet County Tourism and Recreation Industry Promotion Council. Cover title. Title on title page: Native American heritage tour of the east shore of Lake Winnebago.

   542.   Bennett, G. E., Kewaygoshkum, R., & Cobb, T. D. (1997). A Hard Journey Home - Changing Tribal Organization Through Traditional Values. Winds of Change : a Magazine for American Indians, 12(2), 14.
Notes: Source: UnCover
Abstract: Four employees of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of northern Michigan share their vision of a new traditional way of governing, as well as the difficulties they face in getting there.

   543.   Bennett, J. A., & Berry, J. W. (1990). Notions of competence in people of northern Ontario. Papers, Algonquian Conference [Ottawa], 21, 36-50.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   544.   Beno, M. (1991). Treaty Troubles. Audubon, 93(3), 102.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Walleye spearfishing off the reservations by Chippewa Indians has inflamed passions in the Wisconsin woods

   545.   Benton-Banai, E. (1988). Mishomis Book . St. Paul: Red School House.
Notes: Source: cited by Loew, Patty (Fall 1997)

   546.   Berde, S. (Wild ricing: the transformation of an aboriginal subsistence pattern). (1980). Anishinabe  (pp. 101-126). Tallahassee, Florida : University Presses of Florida.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   547.   Berg, C. J. (1981). Climbing Learner's Hill: Benedictines at White Earth, 1878-1945. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Abstract: Ten years after the establishment of the White Earth Indian Reservation (Minnesota) in 1868, Benedictines from St. John'smAbbey, Collegeville, Minnesota, and St. Benedict's Convent, St. Joseph, Minnesota, went to White Earth and began what would be 102 years of service among the Ojibwa. A church and school became the main vehicles for the Christianizing and civilizing these missionaries were attempting. This paper examines the interactions of the Catholic missionaries and the Indians at White Earth between 1878 abd 1945, focusing on the boarding school as its primary field. The study is divided into five chapters: Background, tracing the coming of the Benedictines to Minnesota and their subsequent apostolates, along with an overview of Ojibwa society and culture; The Mission, scrutinizing the missionary experiences at White Earth; Community Life, analyzing the missionary sisters' backgrounds and their goals and methods while working among the Indians; Mission Finances, tracing the various sources of financial aid over the years; Interviews, giving the views of some sisters, priests, and Indian women (former students at the mission school) on successes and failures of the mission. Missionaries have sometimes been referred to as 'cultural revolutionaries'--by both friendly and hostile critics. This study explores the questions: what functional linkage did the Church have with Indian culture in Minnesota? what mutual modifications, if any, were made-or was there only unilateral change on the part of the Indian culture? Were the Benedictines cultural revolutionaries all of the time? some of the time? How were these missionaires influenced by national beliefs and legislation? White Earth--and the boarding school especially--provides a case study for exploration of such questions. More often than not, the Benedictine missionaries at White Earth reflected national attitudes and practices toward the Indian. There were times when the missionaries clearly, however inadvertently or unconsciously, did act as cultural revolutionaries. This occurred primarily in the early decades of the mission--the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and particularly in the area of religion. However, reflecting the gradual change from ignorance and toleration to an appreciation of native culture, from at least the 1930s on the missionaries did not act as cultural revolutionaries.

   548.   Berg, C. S. (1989). Memories Of An Indian Boarding School: White Earth, Minnesota, 1909-1945. The Midwest Review, (11), 27.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   549.   Bergeron, L. (1971). The history of Quebec, A Patriote's Handbook.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   550.   Bergquist, J. G. (1985). Minnetaka Indian boy . Willmar, Minn.  Bergquist Pub.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 13074313

   551.   Berlin, J. D. (1996). The demon of the continent: American literature, Indian conversion, and the dynamics of cultural exchange (Roger Williams, William Bartram, Lydia Maria Childs, James Fenimore Cooper, William Apess). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Pennsylvania.
Abstract: This dissertation is concerned with the ways in which the presence of Indian peoples influences American literatures. Focusing on a series of material and ideological conflicts between Native and Euro-American peoples, I suggest that Indian land-holding patterns, economic relations, and social structures challenged Euro-American dominance, and that to historicize American literatures we must reposition Indians within the texts which--though they might repudiate the presence of native peoples--were obliged to negotiate it. Thus, for example, I read Roger Williams' A Key into the Language of America (1643) in light of encounters between Narragansett exchange economies and colonial market economies; William Bartram's Travels (1791) in terms of revolutionary-era conflicts between Creek communalism and United States individualism; Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok (1824) in the context of antebellum debates over the nature and fate of Indian religions; and James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans (1826) in view of the southern disputes over territorial sovereignty. In addition, I explore how the works of numerous native authors--including William Apess (Pequot), George Copway (Ojibwa), and David Cusick (Tuscarora)--interact with and intersect with the works of Euro-American authors. Considering texts as contested spaces--like the contested land of the nation itself--I conclude that American literatures reflect the intercultural society from which they arose.

   552.   Bernard, J. (1963). History of Minnesota Indians. Minnesota Welfare, Official Publications of the Minnesota Department of Public Welfare, 15(No. 1 and 2).
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"

   553.   Bernard, M. (1929). Religion and magic among Cass Lake Ojibwa. Primitive Man, 2, 52-55.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:33)

   554.   Bernard, S. (1995). La cercle de guerison: survire a la violence?  Une strategie de traitment globale en milieu autochtone. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universite Laval.
Abstract: De type ethnographique, cette etude exploratoire decrit une pratique amerindienne intitulee le cercle de guerison. Son arrivee recente dans les communautes autochtones du Quebec explique la curiosite et les interrogations qu'elle suscite. Dans le but de la connai tre un peu mieux, la presente etude s'est penchee sur cette strategie de traitement qui se veut globale. Toutefois, c'est son utilisation plus specifique dans le traitement de la violence conjugale et familiale qui constitue son veritable interet, car il permet de saisir l'interpretation qu'en donnent les Autochtones et la reponse therapeutique qui en decoule.

   555.   Bial, R. The Ojibwe.  Marshall Cavendish Corporation.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   556.   Bias, W. B., Hsu, S. H., Pollard, M. K., Harvey, J., Lotze, M. T., Arnett, F. C., & Stevens, M. B. (1981). Hla-Dr Characterization of a Chippewa Indian Subpopulation With High Prevalence of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Human Immunology, 2(2), 155-163.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The adult population (N = 227) of a Chippewa Indian reservation in central Minnesota is characterized by a high prevalence of arthropathy with 7.1% having rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a prospective study 168 reservation residents (74%) were evaluated. Complete HLA typing identified 57 haplotypes, many of which probably arose via HLA-A/B or B/D recombination. The number of founder haplotypes appeared to be about 20. The population frequency of DR4 (including DRw9, formerly designated 4 X 7) was 67%; for RA it was 100% (p less than 0.05). Apparent DR4 homozygotes, a number of the RA patients, and family members were selected for further study in a mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) test and with 8th International Workshop cellular and serologic reagents. In MLC with homozygous typing cells (HTC), non of the DR4+ cells typed for any known HLA-D specificity, although they reacted to all DR4 antisera on the local panel. However, 8th International Workshop DR antisera revealed patterns of reactivity with non-DRf4 reagents consistent with the MLC. A minimum of three DR4 variants, one DRw9 variant, and a specificity related to both DR4 and DR2 are required to explain both the cellular and serologic reactions. For the present, we are designating the antigens as DR4.1chip, DR4.2chip, DR4.3chip, DR9chip, and DR(2 X 4)chip. No single variant of DR4 was characteristic of the RA patients in this Amer-indian population.  (Abstract by: Author)

   557.   Water resources of the Red Lake River watershed, northwestern Minnesota [Red Lake River watershed, northwestern Minnesota]  . (1970). Washington, D.C.  U.S. Geological Survey.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search).  Smaller maps, tables, and text accompany main map. "Prepared in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Conservation, Division of Waters, Soils, and Minerals." Map has list of "Selected references".  Other: Winter, Thomas C. Maclay, Robert W. Geological Survey (U.S.) Minnesota. Division of Waters, Soils, and Minerals.

   558.   Bieder, R. E. (Robert Eugene), 1938- . (1995). Native American communities in Wisconsin, 1600-1960 : a study of tradition and change . Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

   559.   Bilodeau, G., De Vernal, A., Hillaire, M. C., & Josenhans, H. (1990). Postglacial Paleooceanography of Hudson Bay Northwest Territories Canada Stratigraphic Microfaunal and Palynological Evidence. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 27(7), 946-963.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: Cores containing representative sequences of postglacial sediments in northern and southern Hudson Bay were analyzed for their microfaunal (foraminifers and ostracods) and palynological (dinocysts, pollen, and spores) content in order to reconstruct the evolution of environments since the last glaciation.  In southern Hudson Bay, the marine invasion of the Tyrrell Sea at ca.  8000 BP, following the Lake Ojibway episode, was accompanied by the development of an Arctic-type microflora and microfauna indicative of a dense seasonal sea-ice cover and stratified water masses.  Shortly after 8000 BP, the establishment of subarctic conditions in surface waters was accompanied by more intense homogenization of water masses.  Subarctic conditions have persisted throughout most of the postglacial interval despite a recent surface-water cooling.  In northern Hudson Bay, micropaleontological and lithological data reveal a succession of proximal to distal glaciomarine environments characterized by low biogenic productivity, harsh Arctic conditions, and stratified water masses.  An increase in dinocyst abundance and diversity, after 6000 BP, indicates the establishment of cool subarctic conditions in surface waters, while foraminifer assemblages suggest intensified mixing of water masses.  The micropaleontological records of northern and southern Hudson Bay reveal a strong latitudinal gradient in biogenic productivity and water mass characteristics throughout the postglacial interval.  'Interglacial' conditions, established in southern Hudson Bay very shortly after it was invaded by the sea, seem to have occurred much later in northern Hudson Bay.

   560.   Binkard, B. (1975). Closing the circle : the Indian in Minneapolis : a new era . Minneapolis : University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Mass Communication.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 4893453. Cover title.

   561.   Birmingham, R. A. (1992). Historic Period Indian Archeology at La Pointe in Lake Superior: An Overview. The Wisconsin Archeologist, 73(3/4), 177.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   562.   Birmingham, R. A. (1994). Native American mounds in Madison and Dane County . [Madison, Wis.] : City of Madison and the Native American Center.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

   563.   (1907). [Photograph, Print, Drawing (Collection)]. A. A. Bish (Alfred A.)  (copyright holder).
Notes: Source: Library Of Congress Online Catalog [Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540] (November 1999 search)--LC Control Number: 89705451. Title devised. Photos bear penned captions identifying sitters or subject.
Abstract: Includes man holding bow and man posed beside doorway of dwelling. War dance includes drum in foreground.

   564.   Bisha, T. D. (1997). The seeds of conflict on a southwestern Ontario Ojibwe reserve. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada).
Abstract: Various anthropologists have identified autonomy as a central principle in interactions among hunter-gatherer Natives in North America. This thesis critically defines and then applies the notion to the case of Ojibwe in southwestern Ontario, as a backdrop for understanding sources of conflict among Natives living at Kettle and Stony Point Reserves and between Natives and Anglos. The thesis relates autonomy, power, and agreement to a hunter-gatherer lifeway, and then distinguishes between a principle of autonomy and the mutual practice of that principle, and proposes the term 'Act of Agreement' to correspond to the latter. The term creates an analytical space outside commonsensical notions of agreement; by redeploying a common term rather than inventing a whole new one, it also emphasizes how everyday usage, as represented in archival sources and in the media, is misleading.

   565.   Bishop, C. A. (1996). The Ojibwa of Western Canada, 1780-1870 - Peers,L. Plains Anthropologist, 41(158), 407-409.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

   566.   Bishop, C. A. (1981). Paredes, J. Anthony [ed.]  Anishinabe: six studies of modern Chippewa. [book review]. American Anthropologist, 83(4), 941-942.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXVII (1985:159)

   567.   Bishop, C. A. (1975). Origin of the speakers of the Severn Dialect. Canadian Museum of Civilization Papers Vol. 23 (pp. 196-208). Ottawa: Canadian Ethnology Service.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   568.   Bishop, C. A. (1989). Question of Ojibwa clans. Papers, Algonquian Conference, (20), 43-61.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   569.   Bishop, C. A. (1972). Demography, ecology and trade among the Northern Ojibwa and Swampy Cree. Western Canadian Journal of Anthropology, 3(1), 58-71.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVIII (1974:88)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   570.   Bishop, C. A. (1976). The emergence of the Northern Ojibwa: social and economic consequences. American Ethnologist, 3(1), 39-54, map, bibliography.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXII (1979:74)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   571.   Bishop, C. A. (1969). The Northern Chippewa: an ethnohistorical study. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo.

   572.   Bishop, C. A. (1974). The Northern Ojibwa and the fur trade: an historical and ecological study. Toronto: Holt, Rinehart and Winston of Canada.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXII (1979:74)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34)
Abstract: Cultures and communities: a series of monographs: native peoples

   573.   Bishop, C. A., & Smith, M. E. (1975). Early historical populations in northestern Ontario: archaeological and ethnohistorical interpretations. American Antiquity, 40, 54-63.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34)

   574.   Bishop, C. A., & Smith, M. E. (1970). The emergence of hunting territories among the Northern Ojibwa. Ethnology, 9(1), 1-15.
Notes: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVI (1972:34)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   575.   Bishop, H. E., 1817-1883. (1863). Dakota war whoop: or, Indian massacres and war in Minnesota. Saint Paul : D.D. Merrill.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 25123168 ... accession: 17745450 ... accession: 13851102 ... accession: 6189529 ... accession: 6182805

   576.   . (1864). H. E. Bishop, 1817-1883Dakota war whoop, or, Indian massacres and war in Minnesota of 1862-3 Rev. ed. ed., ). St. Paul : Published for the author ; Auburn, N.Y. : Wm. J. Moses' Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24060718

   577.   Bishop, J. W. J. W. W. (1890). Narrative of the Second Regiment . in Minnesota in the Civil and Indian wars, 1861- 1865 Vol. [Vol. 1].  (p. [79]-146 ). St. Paul, Minn.  Electrotyped and printed for the State by the Pioneer Press Co., 1891-1899.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 12271896. Caption title. ... accession: 12271909

   578.   Bitney, R. H. (1936 April). [Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington D. C.].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   579.   Bitney, R. H. (1937 June). [Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington D. C.].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   580.   Bitney, R. H. (1937 July). [Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Washington D. C.].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   581.   Bitney, R. H. (1940 June). [Letter to Commissioner of Indian Affairs].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   582.   Black, A. K. (1934). Shaking the Wigwam. The Beaver, Outfit 265, 13-34.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34)

   583.   Black, B., Dooley, J., Pyper, A., & Reed, M. (1993). Multiple Hereditary Exostoses. An Epidemiologic Study of an Isolated Community in Manitoba. Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research, (287), 212-217.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: From 1986 through 1988, 266 persons (149 adults and 117 children) were screened for multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE) in an isolated northern Ojibway community. Physical examination and confirmation by roentgenogram skeletal survey disclosed 21 children (19.4%) and 14 adults (9.5%) affected with MHE. Forty-one percent of children had lesions detectable before ten years of age, some as early as two years of age. Seventy-four percent of the lesions were characteristically sessile. Although lesions about the knee were most common, sites previously thought to be uncommon such as the metatarsals, hand, and spine were involved in 40% of the children. No cases of malignant degeneration have occurred in the adult population. Severity and multiplicity of lesions in successive generations point to an oncogenic gene origin. This study shows striking variance from current literature and provides a unique and valuable baseline assessment of research on the cause and natural history of MHE.

   584.   Black, M. B. (1971). On Ojibwa question constructions. International Journal of American Linguistics, 37(3), 146-151.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XVII (1973:60)

   585.   Black, M. B. (Ojibwa power belief system). (1977). Anthropology of Power: Ethnographic Studies from Asia, Oceania, and the New World  (pp. 141-151). New York: Academic Press.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   586.   Black, M. B. (1969). A note on gender in elicting Ojibwa semantic structure. Anthropological Linguistics, 11(6), 177-185.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XV (1971:53)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   587.   Black, M. B. (1972-1973). Ojibwa questioning etiquette and use of ambiguity. Studia Linguistica, 23, 13-29.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XIX (1975:77)
bibliography
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34)

   588.   Black, M. R. B. (1967). An ethnoscience investigation of Ojibwa ontology and world view. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Stanford University.

   589.   Black-Rogers, M. (1987). Application des principes de l'ethnoscience aux données narratives, avec exemples Ojibwas. Recherches Am'Erindiennes Au Québec, 17(4), 5-16, ill.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   590.   Black-Rogers, M. (1990). Fosterage and field data: the Round Lake Study 1989. Papers, Algonquian Conference [Ottawa], 21, 57-71.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   591.   Blackbird, A. J. C. M. (1887). History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan; a grammar of the language and personal and family history of the author, by Andrew J. Blackbird, late U.S. Interpreter ... Ypsilanti, MI: The Ypsilantian Job Printing House.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:34), "reprinted, Petoskey, MI: Little Traverse Regional Historical Society, Inc., 1967?)

   592.   Blackwood, M. (1910). Naming of a town. Red Man, 2(10), 41-42.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   593.   Blaeser, K. M. (1990). Gerald Vizenor: writing--in the oral tradition. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Notre Dame.
Abstract: As a mixedblood writer of the twentieth century, Gerald Vizenor finds himself an heir of an oral culture, but creating in a written form. With great self-consciousness he has tried to keep alive the essence of tribal oral tradition and to avoid the pitfalls of static prose. This endeavor has led him to an eclectic incorporation in his writing of both the recognizable techniques of Native American literature and the theories and techniques of contemporary reader response aesthetics. This dissertation examines Vizenor's work in light of his attempt to write in a way that ultimately breaks free of fixed meaning, that involves the reader in an act of co-creation of the literary moment. I begin the study by identifying important concepts of Native American oral tradition--particularly as expressed by N. Scott Momaday--that exerted an influence on Vizenor's philosophy and style. I then show the presence of these concepts in Vizenor's work, examining for example, his ideas of 'cultural word wars.' Next, noting the dissatisfaction Vizenor feels with conventional methods of writing journalism and history, I discuss examples of his own experiments in each genre, his representation of reality outside the confines of a conventional view of time and his 'narrative histories.' In his search for a way to write that approximates the dialogic of the oral tradition, Vizenor adapts various methods to help him achieve his goal. I discuss the relationship between Ojibway dream songs and his haiku poetry, and analyze his theories of 'trickster fiction' and his use of the tribal trickster figure. I underscore connections between Vizenor's writing and postmodern theories of the 'open text,' examine his strategies of indeterminacy, and note the stylistic devices he employs to elicit reader response. I give attention to a wide range of Vizenor's works and methods including his use of metaphor, allegory, and various types of ambiguity, and his transgression of conventional literary codes. Ultimately, this study affirms Gerald Vizenor's success in his attempt to write in the Native American oral tradition and assesses his place among other contemporary tribal writers.

   594.   (1994). Fish Creek, WI : Alliance Publications.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (October, 1999 search)

   595.   Blain, E. M. (1992). Prosodic look at Ojibwa reduplication. Papers, Algonquian Conference, 23, 22-44.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   596.   Blair, E. (1949). 1984.  Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   597.   Blakeley, R. (1898). History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

   598.   Blakeley, R. (1898). Opening of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization . in Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society. Volume VIII.    St. Paul, Minn.: The Minnesota Historical Society.
Notes: Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Abstract: The international boundary between Lake Superior  and the Lake of the Woods / by Ulysses Sherman Grant -- The settlement and  development of the Red River Valley / by Warren Upham -- The discovery and  development of the iron ores of Minnesota / by N.H. Winchell -- The origin  and growth of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Alex. Ramsey -- Opening  of the Red River of the North to commerce and civilization / by Russell Blakeley -- Last days of Wisconsin territory and early days of Minnesota  territory / by Henry L. Moss -- Lawyers and courts of Minnesota prior to  and during its territorial period / by Charles E. Flandrau -- Homes and  habitations of the Minnesota Historical Society / by Charles E. Mayo -- The  historical value of newspapers / by J.B. Chaney -- The United States  government publications / by D.L. Kingsbury -- The first organized  government of Dakota / by Samuel J. Albright -- How Minnesota became a  state / by Thomas F. Moran -- Minnesota's ! northern boundary / by Alexander N. Winchell -- The question of the sources  of the Mississippi River / by E. Levasseur. The source of the Mississippi / by N.H. Winchell --  Prehistoric man at the headwaters of the Mississippi River / by J.V. Brower  -- Charter members of the Minnesota Historical Society and its work in 1896  / by Alex. Ramsey -- History of agriculture in Minnesota / by James J. Hill  -- History of mining and quarrying in Minnesota / by Warren Upham --  History of the discovery of the Mississippi River and the advent of  commerce in Minnesota / Russell Blakeley -- Reminiscences of persons and  events in the early days of the Minnesota Historical Society / by William  H. Kelley -- Fort Snelling from its foundation to the present time / by  Richard W. Johnson -- Sully's expedition against the Sioux, in 1864 / by  David L. Kingsbury -- State-building in the West / by Charles E. Flandrau

   599.   Blanchard, D. S. (David Scott), 1950- . (1980). Kahnawake: apercu historique . Kahnawake [Quebec] : Kanien'kehaka Raotitiohkwa Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search); Bibliographie: p. 28-32
OTHER: Centre culturel Kanien'kehaka  Raotitiohkwa

   600.   Blanchard, L., 1872-1959. (1969). The lumberjack frontier; the life of a logger in the early days on the Chippeway. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   601.   Bleeker, S. (1955). The Chippewa Indians, rice gatherers of the Great Lakes. New York: Morrow.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology (1955:I-355)

   602.   Bleeker, S. (1955). The Chippewa Indians: wild rice gatherers of the Great Lakes. New York: William Morrow and Company, Incorporated.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:95), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Excellent look at the tribal way of life of a Chippewa family before the coming of the white man.  Grades 4-6."

   603.   Blegen, T. C. (1963). Minnesota, a history of the state. Minneapolis/St. Paul: University of Minnesota Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
(pages 18-19) the destruction of about 10,000 known burial mounds and "effigy [sic] mounds, shaped in the form of birds, buffaloes, bears or snakes, with ... religious meanings, but these unhappily have since [1880] been plowed under by farmers who cared more about crops than about archaeology."
cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"

   604.   Blegen, T. C., 1891-1969. (1965). A note on Schiller's Indian threnody. Minnesota History, 39, 198-[200], illus., ports.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 19337618. Includes a translation, by Harold Jantz, of Nadowessiers Totenlied by J.C.F. von Schiller.

   605.   Blessing, F. K. (1956). Contemporary costuming of Minnesota Chippewa Indians. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 20, 1-8.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   606.   Blessing, F. K. (1961). Discovery of a Chippewa Peyote Cult in Minnesota. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 23 , 1-8.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   607.   Blessing, F. K. (1956). An exhibition of Mide magic. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 20, 9-13.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   608.   Blessing, F. K. (1961). Fasting and dreams among Minnesota Ojibway. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 23, 9-11.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   609.   Blessing, F. K. (1956). Miscellany. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 20, 14-17.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   610.   Blessing, F. K. (1977). The Ojibway Indians observed. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Archaeological Society.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   611.   Blessing, F. K. (1952). The physical characteristics of southern Ojibwa woodcraft. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 18, 9-21.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   612.   Blessing, F. K. (1954). Some observations on the use of bark by Southern Ojibwa Indians. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 19(3-14).
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   613.   Blessing, F. K. (1956). Some uses of bone, horn, claws and teeth by Minnesota Ojibwa Indians. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 20(1-11).
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   614.   Blessing, F. K. (1961). A visit to an Ojibway Dream Dance. The Minnesota Archaeologist, 23, 12-16.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:35)

   615.   Bloom, B. S., Davis, A., & Hess, R. (1965). Compensatory education for cultural deprivation.  Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:101), "Bibliography"

   616.   Bloomfield, L. (1957). Eastern Ojibwa, grammatical sketch, texts and word list. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. IV (1960:1037)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:36)

   617.   Bloomfield, L. Menomini Texts.  A M S Press, Incorporated.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   618.   . (1979). H. Blue, 1905- , & H. T. HooverReminiscences of Harriet Blue, Sisseton Indian of Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23180018

   619.   . (1979). J. Blue, 1922- , & H. T. HooverReminiscences of Jesse Blue, Sisseton- Chippewa of Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23180039

   620.   . (1979). L. Blue, 1928- , & H. T. HooverReminiscences of Larry Blue, Sisseton Indian of Minnesota .

   621.   . (1979). T. Bluestone, & H. T. Hoover Reminiscences of Tom Bluestone, Mdewakanton Community of Prior Lake, Minnesota .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 23179950

   622.   (1997). (Report No. MN F-029-R(P)-16/Job 396/Study 4). Minnesota Dept. Nat. Res..
Notes: Source: Fish & Fisheries Worldwide database, Fish & Wildlife Reference Service [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 29, 1999 search

   623.   Boehme, S. E. (1997). Seth Eastman: illustrating the Indian condition (Henry Rowe Schoolcraft). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Bryn Mawr College.
Abstract: 'Seth Eastman: Illustrating the Indian Condition' examines the relationship of illustrations by artist Seth Eastman (1808-1875) to the text of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition and Prospects of Indian Tribes of the United States (1852-1857). In order to place Eastman's work within a tradition, illustrated publications about Indians by J. O. Lewis, Thomas McKenney-James Hall, and George Catlin are analyzed to show how growth in knowledge about Indians affected visual images, leading up to the Schoolcraft-Eastman work. Eastman's career in the United States Army substantially affected his second career as an artist. At the United States Military Academy at West Point Eastman received artistic training through standard academic methods of copying, and he developed a topographical system which was conceptual and symbolic. Stationed at Fort Snelling in Minnesota, Eastman lived near Dakota and Chippewa and expanded from painting landscapes to portraying the Indian. He developed a body of works depicting the Indian in a prosaic, descriptive style. His wife, Mary Henderson Eastman, collected Indian stories and published them in Dacotah; or, Life and Legends of the Sioux around Fort Snelling, illustrated by Seth Eastman. Eastman obtained an appointment to provide illustrations for the governmental publication being compiled by Schoolcraft and moved to Washington, D.C. Eastman's pictures functioned to carry the message that the publication presented a factual account of the Indians. Schoolcraft's text provided narratives which would supply interpretations for Eastman's images. The critical responses to the publication showed that his illustrations had an impact on the perception of the publications, with the term 'life-like' applied to the works. Mary Eastman wrote other books about Indian life and used plates from Schoolcraft's work to  illustrate The American Aboriginal Portfolio and Chicora and Other Regions of the Conquerors and the Conquered, giving alternate readings to the same images. Both Schoolcraft and Mary Eastman were reformers, wanting to convert Indians to Christianity, and used the illustrations to bring attention to their perceptions of the  conditions of Indian life. Through their writings, Eastman's seemingly matter-of-fact images became calls to action.

   624.   Boggs, S. T. (1958). Culture change and the personality of Ojibwa Children. American Anthropologist, 60(1), 47-58.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. IV (1960:4573)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:36)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   625.   Boggs, S. T. (1956). An interactional study of Ojibwa socialization. American Sociological Review, 21(2), 191-198.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. II (1956:2-4151)

   626.   Boggs, S. T. (1968). Ojibwa socialization: some aspects of parent-child interaction in a changing culture . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Washington University.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:56)

   627.   Bogle, D. (1989). Toms, coons, mulattoes, mammies and bucks: an interpretive histgory of Blacks in American films. New York: Continuum.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   628.   Boh, E. J. 1920- . (1990). Geographical history of the naming of cities, towns, villages, and townships for counties: Polk, Pennington, Norman, Clearwater, Mahnomen and Red Lake. Dallas, TX .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 35304349

   629.   Bohn, D. K. (1994). The health effects of domestic violence before and during pregnancy among urban American Indian women in Minnesota: an exploratory study (urban women, women victims) . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Rush University, College of Nursing.
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine rates of domestic abuse,  abuse during pregnancy and the health effects of abuse among Native American women. This study is a combined retrospective-prospective exploratory study that examines individual and cumulative physical, sexual and emotional abuses experienced during childhood and adulthood. Thirty pregnant Native American women from one urban clinic participated in the study. Data collection included prenatal and postpartum chart reviews as well as personal interviews. The majority of study participants (90%) reported having experienced some type of abuse, including childhood abuse (physical: 27%; sexual: 40%; either: 47%), sexual abuse as adults (40%; 17% current partner), abuse by an intimate partner (87%; 70% current partner), battering during pregnancy (57%; 33% current pregnancy). Seventy percent of participants had experienced multiple abuses. An Abuse Events variable was created to examine the effects of cumulative abuses. Significant relationships were found between increased abuse events and chemical dependency, depression, increased preterm birth/low birth weight  (PTB/LBW) risk scores and child abuse. Significant relationships were found between current abuse and decreased birth weight and inadequate prenatal care; between childhood abuse and chemical dependency; and between battering during pregnancy and increased Index of Spouse Abuse scores. Perceived cultural acceptance of violence against women was significantly related to current abuse, battering during pregnancy and increased abuse events. Other relationships of clinical, but not statistical significance were found between various types of abuse and inadequate weight gain, sexually transmitted diseases and substance use during pregnancy, suicide attempts, depression, PTB/LBW and miscarriage. The results of this study indicate that Native American women may be a population at great risk of abuse and health problems including substance abuse, suicide and pregnancy complications. Overall rates of abuse and health problems and risks are interpreted using a model of abuse and dysfunction that includes an historical analysis of Native cultures and the intergenerational Post Traumatic Stress Disorder caused by historical and current abuses of Native American peoples. Culturally specific nursing interventions are discussed. Further research to examine culturally specific forms of abuse and to expand the current study are recommended.

   630.   Boller, H. A. (1972). Among the Indians: Four Years on the Upper Missouri, 1858-1862.  University of Nebraska Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   631.   Bolus, R. L. (1994). A Spot Survey of Wild Rice in Northern Minnesota. Journal of Imaging Science & Technology, 38(6), 594-597.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: A survey of the areal extent of wild rice around three lakes in northern Minnesota has been conducted. Wild rice is a desirable natural marsh grass that is sensitive not only to the phosphorus washed from farm, urban, and industrial areas, but also to water level. Both wild birds that migrate along the waterway routes and the Chippewa Indians living there use it as a food staple. The objective of the survey was to produce a geographic information system map from the remotely sensed Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terra (SPOT) data, showing identification and location of the wild rice on the Chippewa reservation and listing its acreage. The approach used was the technique of supervised spectral classification. The results surprisingly show three distinct and separate spectral populations of wild rice. Although it is unrealistic that different varieties are growing in close proximity, some possible causes for the results are that (1) dissimilar land cover backgrounds are causing different mixed pixel responses, (2) varying crop canopies are causing different detected radiance, and (3) varying water content of the vegetation is causing radiance differences. [References: 5]

   632.   Bonatto, S. L., & Salzano, F. M. (1997). A Single and Early Migration for the Peopling of the Americas Supported by Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Data. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America , 94(5), 1866-1871.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: To evaluate the number and time of the migrations that colonized the New World we analyzed all available sequences of the first hypervariable segment of the human mitochondrial DNA control region, including 544 Native Americans. Sequence and population trees showed that the Amerind, Na-Dene, and Eskimo are significantly closer among themselves than anyone is to Asian populations, with the exception of the Siberian Chukchi, that in some analyses are closer to Na-Dene and Eskimo. Nucleotide diversity analyses based on haplogroup A sequences suggest that Native Americans and Chukchi originated from a single migration to Beringia, probably from east Central Asia, that occurred apprxeq 30,000 or apprxeq 43,000 years ago, depending on which substitution rate is used, with 95% confidence intervals between apprxeq 22,000 and apprxeq 55,000 years ago. These results support a model for the peopling of the Americas in which Beringia played a central role, where the population that originated the Native Americans settled and expanded. Some time after the colonization of Beringia they crossed the Alberta ice-free corridor and peopled the rest of the American continent. The collapse of this ice-free corridor during a few thousand years apprxeq 14,000-20,000 years ago isolated the people south of the ice-sheets, who gave rise to the Amerind, from those still in Beringia; the latter originated the Na-Dene, Eskimo, and probably the Siberian Chukchi.

   633.   Bonta, B. (1993). Peaceful peoples : an annotated bibliography . Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow Press.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search)
Abstract: Includes index. Amish -- Anabaptists -- Balinese -- Batek -- Birhor -- Brethren -- Buid -- Chewong -- Doukhobors -- Fipa -- Fore -- G/wi -- Hutterites -- Ifaluk -- Inuit -- Jains -- Kadar -- !Kung -- Ladakhis -- Lepchas -- Malapandaram -- Mbuti -- Mennonites -- Montagnais-Naskapi -- Moravians -- Nayaka -- Nubians -- Onge -- Orang Asli -- Paliyan -- Piaroa -- Quakers -- Rural Northern Irish -- Rural Thai -- San -- Sanpoil -- Saulteaux -- Semai -- Tahitians -- Tanka -- Temiar -- Toraja - - Tristan Islanders -- Waura -- Yanadi -- Zapotec -- Zuni

   634.   Boomer, R. J. (1916). Pipestone Reservation Park; a development of Pipestone Indian Reservation. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 19330745

   635.   Boothroyd, F. (Composer). (1925). Songs of the Red Man  [Musical Score]. Lander, Wyo.  Coolidge Pub. Co.
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 12756858.  Other: Coolidge, Porter Byron. Loring, Harold A.
Abstract: For voice and piano; the 1st two works are adaptations of traditional Indian songs, the 2nd two are original compositions in Indian style. English words, in part translated from Dakota. Cover title. My heart is sad = Cante masica ce : a Sioux lullaby -- Chief Washakie's son : Cheyenne war attack song -- Papoose Lake -- Sacajawea (Bird-woman).

   636.   Borgerding, T. (Father, O.S.B.). (Baptismal records, St. Mary's Mission, Red Lake, MN.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   637.   Borrows, J. J. (1993). A genealogy of law: inherent sovereignty and First Nations self-government (Chippewa, Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada).
Abstract: The inherent and unextinguished nature of self government among the Nawash Band is demonstrated through examining the events of the author's ancestors and community in their interactions with foreign settlers. The investigation of this history is undertaken from a Native perspective in order to access and establish an alternative vision of the political and legal status of First Nations self government. The particular interactions between Native and non-Native society that establish a continuing, inherent exercise of sovereignty are: the Native acceptance of the Royal Proclamation, the War of 1812, the migrations of our people around the Great Lakes, the acceptance of Christianity, the preservation of traditional Native health care, education and language, the entering into of treaties, and the maintenance of self government under the federal Indian Act through the exercise of statecraft and economic development. The author argues that a recounting of these interactive experiences from a Native perspective can serve to infuse legal and political discourse with different alternatives and grant First Nations people the liberty they desire to continue to pursue their aspirations in accordance with their collective goals.  (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

   638.   .
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
meticulous measurements of the energy required for subsistence in a range of human inter-relationships with variously altered ecosystems.

   639.   Bott, E. J. (1949). A comparison of the social organization of the Emo and Ponemah bands of Ojibwa Indians. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Chicago.

   640.   Bourgeois, A. P. (1994). Ojibwa Narratives of Charles & Charlotte Kawbawgam & Jacques LePique, 1893-1895.  Wayne State University Press.
Notes: Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999

   641.   Bourgeois, E. J. (Mainly Logging, a compilation of thoughts while strolling). (1974). C. VandersluisMainly logging : a compilation...   Minneota, MN: Minneota Clinic.
Notes: cited by Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
"Index of lumber camps referred to this volume" and "correctio s and additions": [6] p. inserted. Includes  bibliographies and index. Bourgeois, E. J. Thoughts while strolling.--Morrison, J. G., Jr. Never a dull moment.--Wight, C. L. Reminiscences of a cruiser.

   642.   Bourguignon, E. (T A. Irving Hallowell, the foundations of psychological anthropology, and altered states of consciousness). (1991). Essays in Honor of A. Irving Hallowell  (pp. 17-41). Hillsdale: Analytic Press.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org  via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   643.   Bouza, T. (1989 March). Keeping an eye on the police as they control the underclass. Star Tribune, p. [editorial page].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   644.   (1838). J. T. Bowen, ca. 1801-1856 . Philad[elphi]a : F. W. Greenough.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search).  After a drawing, 1826, by James Otto Lewis. Framed: in Whiting Room.  Other: Greenough, F. W. Lewis, James Otto, 1799-1858. De La Vergne, Earl W.

   645.   (1995).  [Recording]. Portland OR : The Author.
Abstract: Lyrics on insert. Recorded at Deep River Recording, Richmond CA. That's an Irish lullaby -- Golden slumbers (17th C. England) - - My curly-headed baby (plantation lullaby) -- Rozhinkes mit mandlen (Yiddish) -- Bishy by (Scotland) -- Lovely evening (round) -- Dormite ninito (El Salvador) -- Suogan (Wales) -- Mighty like a rose -- Mumma warrunno (Aboriginal) -- Tah ne bah (Saulteaux Indians) -- Ho ho watanay (Iroquois)

   646.   Bower, B. (1999). When Stones Come to Life.(Ojibwa people, and others, who practice animism). Science News, 155(23), 360.
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [review]
Abstract: Many so-called 'primitive' cultures regard various inanimate objects and natural phenomena as living beings. This belief, called 'animism' by some, brings with it a sharp attunement with objects and forces of nature, such as trees, wind, and even stones. This view of nature often seems strange to people of the Western world, who nonetheless can readily identify various life forms in Rorschach inkblots.

   647.   Bowman, S.-J. (1997). First Person. Honolulu, 31(11), 82.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Aloha Ojibwa

   648.   Boyd, D. (1974). Rolling Thunder: a personal exploration into the secret healing powers of an American Indian medicne man. New York: Random House.
Notes: Source: Parapsychology Abstracts International, 1983:31
Abstract: Doug Boyd, a Menninger Foundation staff member of the Project on Voluntary Control of Internal States headed by Elmer Green, offers a biography of the American Indian medicine man, Rolling Thunder, who speaks for both the Cherokee and the Shoshone tribes.  A shaman and guardian of Indian tribal lore, Rolling Thunder's "power" is said to include the ability to heal wounds and cure diseases, make rain, perform exorcisms, use telepathy, and apport objects.  His power is reputed to arise from the medicine man's relation to the earth spirit.  Boyd lived with and accomanied Rolling Thunder, who taught him some of his wisdom, which Boyd in turn attempts to communicate through this book to both lay persons and other scientists.  The epilogue by the Greens discusses the scientific status of parapsychology and of encounters with such persons as Rolling Thunder.  They point out that the observer can create what he or she wants to see, but add that Boyd "is an observer who can himself be silent, can observe without stirring the waters ... and so the reflection of Rolling Thunder's reality is relatively uncontaminated  by prejudgements."--R.A.W.

   649.   (1996). [Audiovisual]. L. Boyd, 1962-  (Heaven Fire Productions). Van Nuys, CA : Exclusive Pictures, Heaven Fire Productions.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 39807434
Abstract: VHS Examines the case of two Tlingit Indian youths who were tried by a tribal court for a crime committed outside reservation land. They were sentenced to a period of banishment in the Alaskan wilderness.

   650.   Boyer, L. R. (1998). Chippewa families: A social study of White Earth Reservation, 1938. MICH HIST REV , 24(2), 175-176.
Notes: Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   651.   Bradburn, F. (1994). Shannon - an Ojibway Dancer - King,S. Wilson Library Bulletin, 68(6), 89 ff.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search

   652.   Bradof, K. L. (1988). Environmental impacts of drainage-ditch and road construction on Red Lake peatland, northern Minnesota : drainage history, hydrology, water chemistry, and tree growth . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Minnesota.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 29051695

   653.   Brakel, S. J. (1978). American Indian tribal courts : the costs of separate justice . Chicago: American Bar Foundation.
Notes: Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search)

   654.   Brand, S. (1976). For God's Sake, Margaret, conversation with Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead. The Co-Evolution Quarterly.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
[published in Sausalito, CA]

   655.   Brands, A. J. (1980). Pharmacists in the Wide Wide World of PHD. Tomorrow's Pharm, 2, 4-7.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: The opportunities, duties, and career of a Public Health Service pharmacist are briefly discussed.

   656.   Brandson, L. E. (1981). From tundra to forest: a Chippewayan resource manual. Winnipeg: Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)

   657.   Brar, S. S., Nelson, D. M., & Gustafson, P. F. (1967). Continuing studies of 137-Cs in fish from the Red Lakes, Minnesota. ANL-7409. ANL Rep:289-90.
Notes: Source: Medline [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 29, 1999 search

   658.   Brass, E., 1905- . (1987). I walk in two worlds . Calgary, Alta.  Glenbow Museum.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   659.   Brasser, T. J. (1984). Backrest banners among the Plains Cree and Plains Ojibwa. American Indian Art, 10(1), 56-63, il.
Notes: Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Vol. XXX (1987:121)
Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   660.   Brasser, T. J. (1999). Notes on a Recently Discovered Indian Shirt From New France. American Indian Art Magazine, 24(2), 46.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Abstract: Details a small group of historic skin artifacts with abstract paintings that presumably originate from the Great Lakes or Eastern Prairie and -- in light of these -- tries to uncover the provenance of a shirt painted in this style that was acquired from a French antiques dealer in the 1980s.

   661.   Brasser, T. J. C. (1975). Metis artisans. Beaver, outfit 306(2), 52-57, ill.
Notes: Source: endeavor.rlg.org via University of Minnesota online database, August 1999 search

   662.   Brave Heart, M. Y., & Debruyn, L. M. (1998). The American Indian Holocaust: Healing Historical Unresolved Grief. [Review] [90 Refs]. American Indian & Alaska Native Mental Health Research, 8(2), 56-78.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Abstract: American Indians experienced massive losses of lives, land, and culture from European contact and colonization resulting in a long legacy of chronic trauma and unresolved grief across generations. This phenomenon, labeled historical unresolved grief, contributes to the current social pathology of high rates of suicide, homicide, domestic violence, child abuse, alcoholism and other social problems among American Indians. The present paper describes the concept of historical unresolved grief and historical trauma among American Indians, outlining the historical as well as present social and political forces which exacerbate it. The abundant literature on Jewish Holocaust survivors and their children is used to delineate the intergenerational transmission of trauma, grief, and the survivor's child complex. Interventions based on traditional American Indian ceremonies and modern western treatment modalities for grieving and healing of those losses are described.  (90 Refs)  (Abstract by: Author)

   663.   Bray, H. (1995). How will Detroit spell economic relief: to some Motor City officials, the answer is casinos. Black Enterprise, 25(12), 17 (1).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Two casinos are voter-approved for Detroit. One will be owned by Chippewa people. The other, the Mirage-Atwater casino has many African American investors. However Michigan state law will have to be changed for it is illegal to gamble in Michigan except in Native American-owned casinos.

   664.   Bray, M. C. (1970). Journals of Joseph N. Nicollet: A Scientist on the Mississippi Headwaters with Notes on Indian Life, 1836-37.  Minnesota Historical Society Press.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)

   665.   Breck, J. L. (1857). Chippeway pictures from the Territory of Minnesota. Hartford, Connecticut: Church Missions Publishing Co.
Notes: Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:36)

   666.   Bredin, M. (1997). Making It Their Own - Severn Ojibwe Communicative Practices - Valentine, L. P. Canadian Review of Sociology & Anthropology, 34(2), 231-233.
Notes: Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999

   667.   Brehm, V. (1996). The Metamorphoses of an Ojibwa Manido (the Role of Micipijiu in Erdrich, Louise Texts). American Literature, 68(4), 677-706.
Notes: Source: UnCover (August 1999 search)
Source: University of Minnesota BioMed electronic databases, Fall 1999 search
Source: http://www.webofscience.com/CIW.cgi -- subject search on all indexes, Fall 1999
Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search
Abstract: Micipijiu, the most significant manidog of the Ojibwa Indians, continues to remain influential from the time of his creation before European contact. He is still the bond between power and value in American Indian culture. As he was the protector of resources necessary to sustain life, such as food, in earlier times, he has become a guarantor for the preservation of Indian culture and land, which is threatened by American culture. Louise Erdrich's novels, such as 'The Bingo Palace,' follow the earlier pattern of Indian women in recreating Micipijiu to face contemporary threats.   

   668.   Brehm, V. (1993). Refiguring a literature of place: the economics of Great Lakes maritime literature (regional literature, Michigan, Illinois, Ontario). Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Iowa.
Abstract: This study describes part of the literary history of the maritime world of the Great Lakes. Several subjects--the War of 1812, travel narratives, children's literature, and voyageur chansons--will be considered in a later volume. Here, I have scrutinized four divisions of the literature: Native American texts, women's literature, ship's captains' autobiographies, and merchant marine literature. The four chapters examine representative works in relation to cultural and economic history. This literature is a regional one that has been influenced by Native American perceptions of place, by socio-economic changes resulting from the ending of the frontier and the transition to industrial capitalism, and by the inherent characteristics of the craft-skill of seafaring on the lakes. The result of these changes was to reduce the role of women, undermine the authority of the ship's master, and eventually question reliance on technology. The literature moves from reflecting the optimism of a maritime frontier where social roles were fluid and opportunity for individual advancement was great, to evaluating the effects of technology and mature industrial capitalism on the men and women whose lives were shaped by policies over which they had no control. Although the literature reflects changing literary fashions during the past 150 years, the conflict of an individual fighting against the forces of the environment and the exploitation of labor remains constant. The use of the waters of the lakes as a symbol of power is a paradigm that occupies writers from Native American pre-history to the present, although few achieve control of the waters of their place on them. The literature is a special product of its landscape.  The cultural work the texts accomplish is neither specifically Canadian nor American, but uses elements of both, with a regional vision, to create texts unique on the continent that reflect trans-national concerns.

   669.   (1966). (Report No. Minn. Div. Of Game And Fish; 26/2/9-17., 1966; Project No.: Minn. W-011-R-27/Wk.Pl. A/Job 08).
Notes: Source: Wildlife Worldwide database, Fish & Wildlife Reference Service [University of Minnesota onlinedatabases], August 1999 search
Abstract: Beltrami Island State Forest. Red Lake Wildlife Management Area.

   670.   Brening, G. (1992). Building the Bark Canoe: Jack Minehart makes canoes the way the Ojibwe did. The Minnesota Volunteer, 55(320), 46.
Notes: Source: UnCover database (Aug 1999)

   671.   Brewster, B. (1963). The first book of Indians. New York: Franklin Watts, Inc.
Notes: cited in: Minnesota Chippewa Indians: a handbook for teachers (1967:91), "Annotated list of selected teaching materials"
Abstract: "Describes how the Indians once lived and how they created their own culture.  A contrasting picture is presented with today's Indian life."

   672.   Briggs, L. J. (1988). Indian student profiles 1987-88 : Arrowhead Community College Region Services to Indian People Program . [Minn.] : Arrowhead Community College Region Services to Indian People Program .
Notes: Source: WorldCat (October 1999 search), accession: 20686608. Title from cover. "July 1988."

   673.   Brill, C. (1974). Indian and free: a contemporary portrait of life on a Chippewa reservation. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: Helen Hornbeck Tanner, The Ojibwas, a critical bibliography (1976:36)
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search) ... accession: 34006531

   674.   Brill, C. (1992). Red Lake Nation: portraits of Ojibway life. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Notes: Source: Midé bibliography compiled by Sára Kaiser (1997)
Source: PALS online catalog (October 1999 search)
Source: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 24695027.  Rev. ed. of: Indian and free. 1974.

   675.   Brill, C., Vizenor, G. R., 1934- , & Molin, P. F. (1986). Portrait of Red Lake. Roots, 14(3), special issue, "On the Reservation".
Notes: WorldCat (November 1999 search), accession: 13709117
Abstract: Title from cover. Coming home / by Carolyn Gilman -- "Places where I've lived" / by Paulette Fairbanks Molin -- Laurel Hole In the Day / by Gerald Vizenor -- Portrait of Red Lake / photos by Charles Brill -- Digging deeper, branching out / by Stephen Sandell

   676.   Brilliant, L. [Letter to Wub-e-ke-niew and Clara NiiSka].
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
The author acknowledges telephone discussion of these issues with epidemiologist Larry Brilliant, who Howard Reingold recommended as "the world's leading smallpox expert."  Dr. Brilliant helped clarify understanding of the co-evolution of diseases.  Also acknowledged is Dr. Paul Greenough of the University of Iowa, for his understanding of the history of epidemics.
Dr. Brilliant mentioned a place called "Smallpox Acres" in the Atlantic northeast.  "Smallpox blankets" are general knowledge in Ahnishinahbæótjibway oral history.  In this context, Dr. Brilliant commented that four hours exposure to sunlight will kill the smallpox organism.  This is probably why the recipients of blankets from the Prairie du Chien treaty, for example, were told "don't open these packages until you get home." 

   677.   Britton, J. D. (1988). Bureaucrats, miners and the Nez Perce Indians: treaty making in Washington Territory during the Civil War. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Washington State University.

   678.   Britton, N. L., & Brown, A. ((reprint)). Illustrated flora of the northern United States and Canada.  Dover.
Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)

   679.   Brody, H. (1986). Maps and dreams : Indians and the British Columbia frontier . London: Faber & Faber.
Notes: Source: WorldCat database (Fall 1999 search)

   680.   Brogan, K. (1996). Haunted by history: Louise Erdrich's 'Tracks.'. Prospects, Annual , 21, 169 (24).
Notes: Source: InfoTrac [electronic database--Daemon@epub.med.iacnet.com]: Oct 1999 search [review]
Abstract: Louise Erdrich's 'Tracks' is a tale of the dying Chippewa Indian population during the early 19th century, narrated by Nanapush and Pauline Puyat, the last living members of their families. The characters try to establish history by reconstructing the past. While mourning the dead, the characters identify liminally with the dead, and long for their own deaths. The survivors feed on the ghosts of dead families and learn to digest the past. Erdrich's novel is a contemporary Ghost Dance, which promotes the survival of Indians, and suggests that translation is essential to cultural survival.

  1. Broker, I. (1983). Night Flying Woman: an Ojibway narrative. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press.
    Notes: cited in Wub-e-ke-niew (1995)
    Source: International Bibliography of Social and Cultural Anthropology
    Source: Women’s Resources International [University of Minnesota online database--Women, Race & Ethnicity; Women Of Color And Southern Women Database, August 29, 1999 search
    Source: Books in Print electronic database, Fall 1999 search
    Abstract: Broker addresses her narrative to her grandchildren, "that generation of Ojibway who do not know what the reservation means, or the Bureau of Indian Affairs, or the tangled treaties..." (p.3). In this book, she tells her urban-raised children and grandchildren about her great-great-grandmother, Night Flying Woman, whose life spanned the period of Indians' removal to the reservations.
      In a tale of traumatic upheaval and an optimistic affirmation of Ojibway traditions, the dramatic life experiences of her great-great-grandmother, one of the last Ojibway to be born to the centuries-old forest way of life, are related by the author, a storyteller and Ojibway elder. Copyright, National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) 1992.