U.S. treaty cession map
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detailed descriptions of territory claimed by U.S.  through treaty cessions
(in chronological order)

U.S. treaty of January 21, 1785 (7 Stat. 16) - with the "Wyandot, Delaware, Chippawa and Ottawa Nations."
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: "This treaty was never carried into effect, owing to the hostile attitude assumed by a large proportion of the Ohio tribes, and it was finally superseded by the treaty of Aug. 3, 1795, at Greenville."

Date: January 21, 1785
Where or how concluded: Fort McIntosh
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 16.
Tribe: Wyandot, Delaware, Chippewa, and Ottawa.

Description of cession or reservation: Defines their boundaries and reserves to the use of the U. S. sundry tracts at various points named.

Historical data and remarks: This treaty was never carried into effect, owing to the hostile attitude assumed by a large proportion of the Ohio tribes, and it was finally superseded by the treaty of Aug. 3, 1795, at Greenville.


U.S. treaty of January 9, 1789 (7 Stat. 28) - with the "Sachems and Warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Pattawatima and Sac Nations."  U.S. proclamation, September 27, 1789.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: concluded at Fort Harmar, Ohio; reaffirms boundaries and reserves under treaty of January 21, 1785, and cedes all other claims.  "This treaty was never carried into effect, owing to the uninterrupted hostilities on the part of the Indians, and it was finally superseded by the provisions of the treaty of Aug. 3, 1795, at Greenville."

Date: January 9, 1789
Where or how concluded: Fort Harmar, Ohio.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 28.
Tribe: Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Sauk.

Description of cession or reservation: Reaffirm boundaries and reserves under treaty of Jan. 21, 1785, and cede all other claims.

Historical data and remarks: This treaty was never carried into effect, owing to the uninterrupted hostilities on the part of the Indians, and it was finally superseded by the provisions of the treaty of Aug. 3, 1795, at Greenville.


U.S. treaty of August 3, 1795 (7 Stat. 49) - with the "Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoes, Ottawas, Chipewas, Putawatimes, Miamis, Eel-river, Weea's, Kickapoos, Piankashaws, and Kaskaskias."  U.S. proclamation, December 2, 1795. 
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: "The tract ... ceded comprised the eastern and southern portions of Ohio, embracing nearly two-thirds of the State, and a triangular piece in southeastern Indiana."

Date: August 3, 1795
Where or how concluded: Greeneville, Ohio.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 49.
Tribe: Wyandot, Delaware, Shawnee, Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawatomi, Miami, Eel River, Wea, Kickapoo, Piankishaw, and Kaskaskia.

Description of cession or reservation: Article 3 defines the general boundary line between the lands of the U. S. and the lands of said tribes as follows: Beginning at the mouth of Cayahoga river and run thence up the same to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of the Muskingum; thence down that branch to the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; thence westerly to a fork of that branch of the Great Miami river running into the Ohio at or near which fork stood Loromie's store and where commences the portage between the Miami of the Ohio and St Mary's river, which is a branch of the Miami, which runs into Lake Erie; thence a westerly course to Fort Recovery, which stands on a branch of the Wabash; then southwesterly in a direct line to the Ohio, so as to intersect that river opposite the mouth of Kentucke or Cuttawa river; and the said Indian tribes cede and relinquish forever all claim to lands lying eastwardly and southwardly of said general boundary line.

The Indians also cede to the U. S. a number of small tracts of land within the general limits of the territory reserved by the former, as follows:

1. Six miles square at or near Loromie's store

2. Two miles square at the head of navigable water on St Mary's river, near Girty's town.

3. Six miles square at the head of navigable water of Au-Glaize river.

4. Six miles square at the confluence of Au-Glaize and Miami rivers where Fort Defiance stands.

5. Six miles square at or near the confluence of St Mary's and St Joseph's rivers, where Fort Wayne stands or near it.

6. Two miles square on the Wabash at the end of the portage from the Miami of the lake, about 8 miles westward from Fort Wayne.

7. Six miles square at the Ouatanon or old Weea towns on the Wabash.

8. Twelve miles square at the British fort on the Miami of the lake, at the foot of the rapids.

9. Six miles square at the mouth of the Miami of the lake, where it empties into Lake Erie.

10. Six miles square on Sandusky Lake, where a fort formerly stood.

11. Two miles square at the Lower rapids of Sandusky river.

12. The post of Detroit and all land to the N., W., and S. of it to which the Indian title had been extinguished by gifts or grants to the French or English governments, and so much more land to be annexed to the district of Detroit as shall be comprehended between the river Rosine on the S., Lake St Clair on the N., and a line the general course whereof shall be 6 miles distant from the W. end of Lake Erie and Detroit river.

13. The post of Michillimackinac, and all the land on the island on which the post stands, and the mainland adjacent, of which the Indian title has been extinguished by gifts or grants to the French or English governments.

Also a piece of land on the main to the N. of the island, to measure 6 miles on Lake Huron or the streight between lakes Huron and Michigan, and to extend 3 miles back from the water of the lake or streight.

Also De Bols Blanc island, being an extra and voluntary gift of the Chippewa nation.

14. Six miles square at mouth of Chikago river, emptying into the SW. end of Lake Michigan where a fort formerly stood.

15. Twelve miles square at or near the mouth of Illinois river.

16. Six miles square at the old Piorias fort and village, near S. end of Illinois lake on Illinois river.

17. The Indians also grant the people of the U. S. a free passage by water and land through their country along the chain of posts from Loromie's store via the St Mary's to Fort Wayne and down the Miami to Lake Erie; also from Loromie's store down the Auglaize to Fort Defiance; also from Loromie's store to Sandusky river and down the same to Sandusky bay; also from Sandusky to the foot of Miami rapids and thence to Detroit; also from mouth of Chikago to Illinois river and down same to the Mississippi; also from Fort Wayne to the Wabash and down Wabash to the Ohio.

18. The U. S. relinquish their claim to all other Indian lands N. of the river Ohio, E. of the Mississippi and W. and S. of the Great Lakes and the waters uniting them, according to the boundary agreed on in the treaty of 1783 between U. S. and Great Britain, except the tract of 150,000 acres, near the rapids of the Ohio, assigned to General Clark for the use of himself and his warriors.

19. The U. S. also reserve and except the post of Vincennes on the river Wabash and the lands adjacent of which the Indian title had previously been extinguished.

20. Also the lands at all other places in possession of the French people and other white settlers among them, of which the Indian title has been extinguished by grants to the French and English governments.

21. Also the post of Fort Massac, toward the mouth of the Ohio.

Historical data and remarks: The tract herein ceded comprised the eastern and southern portions of Ohio, embracing nearly two-thirds of the State, and a triangular piece in southeastern Indiana.

Surveyed in 1805

Surveyed in June, 1803

Surveyed in June, 1803

This tract was never surveyed, and by treaty of Sept. 30, 1809, with the Delawares and others it was retroceded by the U. S. to the Indians. Its boundaries are approximately shown on the map by scarlet lines.

Surveyed in Dec., 1805, by virtue of act of Congress of Mar. 3, 1805; subdivided and sold in accordance with act of Congress of Apr. 27, 1816.

Surveyed in 1806 by Ewing under act of Congress of Mar. 3, 1805

Found to be within limits of Connecticut Western reserve and therefore never separately surveyed. The location of this tract is approximately shown on the map by dotted black lines.

Surveyed by Ewing in 1807 under act of Congress of Mar. 3, 1805; subdivided into town lots and sold under act of Congress approved Apr. 27, 1816.

The necessity for the establishment of the boundaries of this tract was superseded by the conclusion of the treaty of Nov. 17, 1807, whereby the Indians ceded to the U. S. a large extent of territory surrounding and including within its general limits the tract described. The approximate limits of this tract are, however, shown on the map by a dotted black line.

This consists of two separate tracts, one being the island and the other the mainland on the S.

Surveyed in 1827

Any necessity for the survey of this tract was Superseded by the Kaskaskia cession of Aug. 13, 1803, and Sauk and Fox cession of Nov. 3, 1804. The boundaries are approximately shown by dotted black lines.

Any necessity for the survey of this tract was superseded by the Kaskaskia cession of Aug. 13, 1803, and Sauk and Fox cession of Nov. 3, 1804. The boundaries are approximately shown by dotted black lines.

In July, 1779, two Piankishaw chiefs deeded to George Rogers Clarke a tract 2 1/2 leagues square on the N. side of Ohio river, opposite the falls. Virginia never confirmed this grant. Jan. 2, 1781, Virginia ceded to Congress conditionally all right to territory NW. of the Ohio river Sept. 13, 1783, Congress accepted the cession. Dec. 20, 1783, Virginia authorized her delegates in Congress to convey the same to the U. S. The deed was executed Mar. 1, 1784, and contained a condition that not exceeding 150,000 acres promised by Virginia should be granted to Gen. George Rogers Clarke and the officers and soldiers of his regiment, to be laid off in one tract in such place on the NW. side of the Ohio as a majority of the officers shall choose, and to be divided among the officers and soldiers in due proportion, according to the laws of Virginia. The tract when first laid off was called the Illinois grant and afterward Clark's grant.

There having arisen a dispute as to the proper boundaries of this tract, they Were specifically defined by treaty of June 7, 1803.

This was an indefinite reservation and was never more specifically defined.

This post was at the mouth of Massac creek, a short distance E. of the present site of Metropolis City.

View maps: Ohio ~ Indiana ~ Ohio (detail) ~ Indiana (detail) ~ Michigan (Saginaw bay to Lake Erie) ~ Michigan 1 ~ Illinois 2 ~ Illinois 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 11~12~13~14~15~16~17~18~19~20~21~22~23~24~25~26~27


U.S. treaty of July 4, 1805 (7 Stat. 87) - with the "sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Wyandot, Ottawa, Chipawa, Munsee and Delaware, Shawanee, and Pottawatima nations."  U.S. proclamation, April 24, 1806. 
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: extinguished Indian title areas 53-54 in Ohio.

Date: July 4, 1805
Where or how concluded: Fort Industry, on the Miami of the Lake.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 87.
Tribe: Wyandot, Ottawa, Chippewa, Munsee, Delaware, Shawnee, and Potawatomi.

Description of cession or reservation: Article 2 defines the boundary between the U. S. and these indians as being a meridian line drawn N. and S. through a boundary to be erected on the S. shore of Lake Erie 120 miles due W. of the W. boundary line of the State of Pennsylvania, extending N. until it intersects the boundary line of the U. S., and extending S. it intersects a line previously established by the treaty of Greenville (1795). The Indians cede to the U. S. all lands lying E. of the aforesaid line, bounded southerly and easterly by the line established by the treaty of Greenville, and northerly by the northernmost part of 41ø of N. latitude.

The foregoing cession involves three separate tracts, the first two of which, however, may be considered, for the purposes of this work, as one. These tracts are as follows:

1. The tract claimed by the Connecticut Land Company.

2. The tract claimed by "the proprietors of the half million acres of land lying S. of Lake Erie called Sufferers' Land."

3. The tract lying S. of the two preceding tracts and between the same and the Greenville treaty line of 1795.

Historical data and remarks: The Connecticut Western Reserve, or, as it was sometimes called, New Connecticut, occupied the region between Lake Erie on the N., Pennsylvania on the E., 41ø N. latitude on the S., and the present E. line of Seneca and Sandusky counties on the W. The colonial charter of Connecticut embraced all the lands between 41ø and 42ø 2' N. latitude, from the Providence plantations to the Pacific ocean. After the independence of the U. S., the territorial conflicts of Connecticut with New York and Pennsylvania were compromised, and Connecticut, by deed dated Sept. 14, 1786, relinquished to the U. S. all title and jurisdiction N of 41ø and W. of a meridian 120 miles W. of the W. line of Pennsylvania. She reserved. however, to herself the territory N. of 41ø and E. of said meridian to the Pennsylvania line. This reservation constituted what became known as the Connecticut Western Reserve. All the States having territorial claims NW. of the Ohio having relinquished them to the U. S., except in the case of the Connecticut Reserve, the U. S. proceeded to establish a territorial government over it by the provisions of the ordinance of 1787. Connecticut, never having relinquished her claim to the Western Reserve, resented this extension of jurisdiction as a violation of her rights. This conflict was settled by compromise in 1800, by which Connecticut was guaranteed the exclusive right of soil and the U. S. the right of political jurisdiction. The Indian title to that portion of the Western Reserve lying between Pennsylvania on the E. and the Tuscarawas and Cuyahoga rivers on the W. had already been extinguished by the treaty of 1795. The Indian title to the remaining portion had not been ceded until relinquished by this treaty of July 4, 1805. In 1792 the Connecticut legislature granted 500,000 acres off the W. end of the reserve to such of her citizens as had suffered by the depredations of the British during the Revolutionary war. Under this grant a company was chartered under the laws of Ohio, and the tract became known as "Sufferers' Land." It is divided on the map from the Connecticut Land Company's tract by a N. and S. blue line.

The Indian title to this tract was extinguished at the same time with that of the two preceding tracts and at a cost to the U. S. of somewhat more than one cent per acre.

View maps: Ohio
Designation of cession(s) on map: 53~54


U.S. treaty of November 17, 1807 (7 Stat. 105) - with the "sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Ottoway, Chippeway, Wyandotte, and Pottawatamie nations of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, January 27, 1808.
        Cessions and subsequently-ceded reserve in Ohio and Michigan are described in Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894; areas 66~See 169~See 170~See 183~See 89 and 137~See 135~See 136~See 214, 215, 216, 217.

Date: November 17, 1807
Where or how concluded: Detroit, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 105.
Tribe: Ottawa, Chippewa, Wyandot, and Potawatomi.

Description of cession or reservation: The foregoing tribes cede to the U. S. all claim to the following-described tract of country, viz: Beginning at the mouth of the Miami river of the lakes and running thence up the middle thereof to the mouth of the great Au Glaize river; thence due N. until it intersects a parallel of latitude to be drawn from the outlet of Lake Huron which forms the river Sinclair; thence running NE. the course that may be found will lead in a direct line to White Rock in Lake Huron; thence due E. until it intersects the boundary line between the U. S. and Upper Canada in said lake; thence southwardly, following the said boundary line, down said lake through the river Sinclair, Lake St Clair, and the river Detroit, into Lake Erie, to a point due E. of the aforesaid Miami river; thence W. to the place of beginning.

From the foregoing cession the tribes aforesaid reserve:

1. A tract of 6 miles square on the Miami of Lake Erie above Roche de Boeuf, to include the village where Tondaganie, (or the Dog) now lives.

2. Three miles square on the Miami of Lake Erie (above the 12 miles square ceded to the U. S. by the treaty of Greenville), including what is called Presque Isle.

3. Four miles square on the Miami bay, including the villages where Meshkemau and Waugau live.

4. Three miles square on the river Raizin at a place called Macon, and where the river Macon falls into the river Raizin, which place is about 14 miles from the mouth of said river Raizin.

5. Two sections of 1 square mile each on the river Rouge at Seginsiwin's village.

6. Two sections of 1 mile square each at Tonquish's village, near the river Rouge.

7. Three miles square on Lake St Clair above the river Huron, to include Machonce's village.

8. Six sections of 1 mile square each, within the cession aforesaid, in such situations as the said Indians shall elect, subject to the approval of the President of the U. S. as to the places of location.

Historical data and remarks: This reserve was ceded to the U. S., Aug. 30, 1831

This reserve was located at Wolf Rapids in lieu of Presque Isle, the latter place being already included within the limits of the 12-mile-square tract reserved by the U. S. at the treaty of Greenville in 1795. It was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Aug. 30, 1831.

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Feb. 18, 1833

Ceded to the U. S. by treaties of Sept. 29, 1817, and Sept. 19, 1827

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827

This 3-mile-square tract and 3 of the 6 unlocated sections were surveyed and located by Aaron Greely in 1810, under direction of Governor Hull, as follows: One tract of 262.7 acres on Lake St Clair at the mouth of the Au Vaseau, which included the site of Machonce's village; one tract of 534 acres on Lake St Clair above the mouth of Salt creek; one tract of 1,200 acres at the mouth of A. Dulude or Black river, and 5,760 acres at the mouth of Swan creek of Lake St Clair. These tracts were ceded to the U. S., May 9, 1836. The remaining 3 (of the 6 unlocated sections) had not been specifically located when they were ceded by treaty of Sept. 29, 1817, to the Catholic Church.

View maps: Michigan 1 ~ Ohio ~ Ohio (detail)
Designation of cession(s) on map: 66~See 169~See 170~See 183~See 89 and 137~See 135~See 136~See 214, 215, 216, 217


U.S. treaty of November 25, 1808 (7 Stat. 112) - with the "Sachems, chiefs, and Warriors of the Chippewa, Ottawa, Pottawatamie, Wyandot, and Shawanoese nations of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, March 3, 1809.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: ceded land for a road in Ohio, and "for the purpose of establishing settlements along the same"

Date: November 25, 1808
Where or how concluded: Brownstown, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 112.
Tribe: Chippewa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, Wyandot, and Shawnee.

Description of cession or reservation: The aforesaid tribes cede to the U. S. a tract of land for a road, of 120 feet in width, from the foot of the rapids of the river Miami of Lake Erie to the western line of the Connecticut reserve, and all the land within 1 mile of the said road on each side thereof for the purpose of establishing settlements along the same.

The said tribes also cede to the U. S. a tract of land for a road only, of 120 feet in width, to run southwardly from what is called Lower Sandusky to the boundary line established by the treaty of Greenville.

Historical data and remarks: The line of the road is shown by a scarlet line and the tract of 1 mile in width on each side of the road is colored green.

The line of this road is shown by a scarlet line

View maps: Ohio (detail)
Designation of cession(s) on map: 70


U.S. treaty of September 8, 1815 (7 Stat. 131) - with the "Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, Miami, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, Tribes of Indians, residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, and the Territories of Indiana and Michigan."  U.S. ratification, December 26, 1815.

Date: August 24, 1816
Where or how concluded: St Louis Missouri territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 146.
Tribe: Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi residing on Illinois and Milwaukee rivers and their waters.

Description of cession or reservation: The foregoing tribes or bands cede to the U. S. all claim to that portion of the territory ceded to the U. S. by the Sacs and Foxes by treaty of Nov. 3, 1804, lying S. of a due W. line from the southern extremity of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river.

Said tribes also cede to the U. S. all land contained within the following bounds: Beginning on the left bank of the Fox river of Illinois 10 miles above its mouth; thence running so as to cross Sandy creek 10 miles above its mouth; thence in a direct line to a point 10 miles N. of the W. end of the portage between Chicago creek, which empties into Lake Michigan, and the river Depleines, a fork of the Illinois; thence in a direct line to a point on Lake Michigan 10 miles northward of the mouth of Chicago creek; thence along the lake to a point 10 miles southward of the mouth of Chicago creek; thence in a direct line to a point on Kankakee river 10 miles above its mouth; thence with the said Kankakee and Illinois rivers to the mouth of Fox river, and thence to the beginning.

The U. S. agree to relinquish to the aforesaid tribes or bands all the land contained in the aforesaid cession of Nov. 3, 1804, by the Sacs and Foxes which lies N. of a due W. line from the southern extremity of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river.

From this latter relinquishment the U. S. reserve a tract 3 leagues square at the mouth of the Ouisconsing river, including both banks, and such other tracts on or near to the Ouisconsing and Mississippi rivers as the President of the U. S. may think proper to reserve, provided the same shall not exceed in quantity 5 leagues square.

Historical data and remarks: This tract was retroceded to the U. S. by the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi by treaty of July 29, 1829, first clause.

This tract is shown on the map by the small area colored mauve south of Wisconsin river and east of the Mississippi, at the junction of the two.

View maps: Illinois 2 ~ Illinois 1 ~ Wisconsin 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 77~78~See 147~78a


U.S. treaty of August 24, 1816 (7 Stat. 146) - with the "chiefs and warriors of the united tribes of Ottawas, Chipwawas, and Pottowotomees, residing on the Illionois and Melwakee rivers, and their waters, and on the southwestern parts of Lake Michigan."  U.S. proclamation December 30, 1816.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894: ceded land in Illinois and Wisconsin, areas 77~78~See 147~78a.

U.S. treaty of September 29, 1817 (7 Stat. 160) - with the "sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawanese, Potawatomees, Ottawas, and Chippewa, tribes of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, January 4, 1819, supplementary treaty post.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: September 29, 1817
Where or how concluded: Foot of the rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie.
ReferenceStatutes at Large, Volume VII, page 160.
Tribe: Wyandot, Seneka, Delaware, Shawnee, Potawatomi, Ottawa, and Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: The Wyandots cede to the U. S. the land comprehended within the following boundaries: Beginning at a point on the southern shore of Lake Erie, where the present Indian boundary line intersects the same between the mouth of Sandusky bay and the mouth of Portage river; thence running S. with said line to the line established in 1795 by the treaty of Greenville, which runs from the crossing place above Fort Lawrence to Loramie's store; thence westerly with the last-mentioned line to the eastern line of the reserve at Loramie's store; thence with the lines of said reserve N. and W. to the northwestern corner thereof; thence to the northwestern corner of the reserve on the river St Mary's, at the head of the navigable waters thereof; thence E. to the western bank of the St Mary's river aforesaid; thence down the western bank of said river to the reserve at Fort Wayne; thence with the lines of the latter reserve easterly and northerly to the N. bank of the river Miami of Lake Erie; thence down the N. bank of said river to the western line of the land ceded to the U. S. by the treaty of Detroit in 1807; thence with said line S. to the middle of said Miami river opposite the mouth of the Great Auglaize river; thence down the middle of the Miami river and easterly with the lines of the tract ceded to the U. S. by the treaty of Detroit aforesaid, so far that a S. line will strike the place of beginning.

The Potawatomy, Ottawa, and Chippewa tribes cede to the U. S. the land within the following boundaries: Beginning where the western line of the State of Ohio crosses the river Miami of Lake Erie, which is about 21 miles above the mouth of the Great Auglaize river; thence down the middle of said Miami river to a point north of the mouth of the Great Auglaize river; thence with the western line of the land ceded to the U. S. by the treaty of Detroit, in 1807, N. 45 miles; then W. so far that a line S. will strike the place of beginning; thence S. to the place of beginning.

To the foregoing cessions the other tribes parties to this treaty give their full assent.

The U. S. agree to grant by patent in fee simple to Doanquod, Howoner, Rontondee, Tauyau, Rontayau, Dawatont, Manocue, Tauyaudantauson, and Haudaunwaugh, chiefs of the Wyandot tribe, and their successors in office, for the use of the persons and for the purposes mentioned in the annexed schedule, a tract of land 12 miles square at Upper Sandusky, the center of which shall be a place where Fort Ferree stands.

The U. S. also grant on the same terms and to the same parties last above named, 1 mile square, to be located where the chiefs direct, on a cranberry swamp on Broken Sword creek, and to be held for the use of the tribe.

The U. S. also agree to grant by patent in fee simple to the chiefs of the Seneca tribe and their successors in office for the use of the persons mentioned in the annexed schedule, a tract of land to contain 30,000 acres, beginning on the Sandusky river at the lower corner of the section hereinafter granted to William Spicer; thence down said river on the E. side, with the meanders thereof at high-water mark, to a point E. of the mouth of Wolf creek; thence and from the beginning E. so far that a N. line will include the quantity of 30,000 acres aforesaid.

The U. S. also agree to grant by patent in fee simple to the chiefs of the Shawnese tribe residing at Wapaghkonetta, and their successors in office, for the use of the persons mentioned in the annexed schedule, a tract of land 10 miles square, the center of which shall be the council house at Wapaghkonetta.

The U. S. also agree to grant by patent in fee simple to the chiefs of the Shawnese tribes residing on Hog creek, and their successors in office, for the use of the persons mentioned in the annexed schedule, a tract of land containing 25 square miles, which is to join the tract granted at Wapaghkonetta, and to include the Shawnese settlement on Hog creek, and to be laid off as nearly as possible in a square form.

The U. S. also agree to grant by patent in fee simple to the chiefs of the Shawnese tribe residing at Lewistown, and to the chiefs of the Seneca tribe residing at Lewistown, and to their successors in office, for the use of the persons mentioned in the annexed schedule, a tract of land to contain 48 square miles, to begin at the intersection of the line run by Charles Roberts in the year 1812 from the source of the Little Miami river to the source of the Sciota river, in pursuance of instructions from the commissioners appointed on the part of the U. S. to establish the western boundary of the Virginia military reservation with the Indian boundary line established by the treaty of Greenville in 1795 from the crossings above Fort Lawrence to Loramie's store, and to run from such intersection northerly with the first-mentioned line and westerly with the second-mentioned line, so as to include the quantity as nearly in a square form as practicable after excluding the section of land hereinafter granted to Nancy Stewart.

The U. S. also agree that there shall be reserved for the use of the Ottawa Indians, but not granted to them, a tract of land on Blanchard's fork of the Great Auglaize river, to contain 5 miles square, the center of which tract is to be where the old trace crosses the said fork.

The U. S. also agree that there shall be reserved for the use of the Ottawa Indians, but not granted to them, a tract to contain 3 miles square on the Little Auglaize river, to include Oquanoxa's village.

The Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potowatomy tribes grant to the rector of the Catholic church of St Anne, of Detroit, and to the corporation of the college at Detroit, to be retained or sold as they see fit, each one-half of three sections of land on the river Raisin, at a place called Macon; also

Three sections of land not yet located, which tracts were reserved for the use of said Indians by the treaty of Detroit in 1807.

The Delaware tribe cede to the U. S. all claim to the thirteen sections of land reserved for the use of certain persons of their tribe by the second section of the act of Congress passed Mar. 3, 1807.

The U. S. agree to grant by patent in fee simple to the chiefs of the Delaware Indians living on the Sandusky waters and their successors in office, in the same manner and subject to the same conditions as are hereinbefore provided for the lands granted to the Wyandot, Seneca, and Shawanee Indians, a tract of land to contain 9 square miles, to join the tract granted to the Wyandots of 12 miles square, to be laid off as nearly in a square form as practicable and to include Captain Pipe's village.

The U. S. also agree to grant by patent to the chiefs of the Ottawa tribe for the use of said tribe a tract of land to contain 34 square miles, to be laid out as nearly in a square form as practicable, not interfering with the lines of the tracts reserved by the treaty of Greenville in 1795 on the S. side of the Miami river of Lake Erie, and to include Tushquegan or McCarty's village, which tract thus granted shall be held by the said tribe upon the usual conditions of Indian reservations as though no patent were issued.

At the special request of the said Indians the U. S. also agree to grant to certain individuals 14 tracts of land aggregating 9,480 acres.

Historical data and remarks: This tract was enlarged by treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, by the terms of which the tenure was also changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve out of the ceded tract. By treaty of Apr. 23, 1836, 5 miles off the E. end were ceded to the U. S. By treaty of Mar. 17, 1842, the remainder of the reserve was ceded to the U. S.

By treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, the tenure of this tract was also changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve. By treaty of Apr. 23, 1836, it was ceded to the U. S. It comprised Sec. 35, T. 1 S., R. 17.

This tract was enlarged by treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, by the terms of which the tenure was also changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve out of the ceded tract. By treaty of Feb. 28, 1831, it was ceded to the U. S.

This tract was enlarged by treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, by the terms of which the tenure was also changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve out of the ceded tract. By treaty of Aug. 8, 1831, it was ceded to the U. S..

By treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, the tenure of this tract was changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve out of the ceded tract. By treaty of Aug. 8, 1831, it was ceded to the U. S.

This tract was enlarged by treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, by the terms of which the tenure was also changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve out of the ceded tract. By treaty of July 20, 1831, it was ceded to the U. S.

This tract was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Aug. 30, 1831

This tract was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Aug. 30, 1831

As shown by the language of the treaty, these three sections had not been located, and it was a mere transfer of the right to locate them from the Indians to the Catholic church.

The U. S. afterward sold these sections under the provisions of an act of Congress approved May 11, 1820.

By treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, the tenure by which the Indians held this tract was changed from a grant in fee simple to that of a reserve. By treaty of Aug. 3, 1829, it was ceded to the U. S.

By treaty of Sept. 17, 1818, the tenure by which the Indians held this tract was changed from a grant by patent to that of a reserve for the use of the Indians until they should cede the same to the U. S. By treaty of Feb. 18, 1833, the Indians ceded it to the U. S.

View mapsOhio ~ Indiana ~ Michigan 1 ~ Ohio (detail) ~ Ohio
Designation of cession(s) on map: 87~88~See 211 and 259~See 212~See 163~See 165~See 166~See 164~See 167~See 168~89~90, 91~See 150~See 182


U.S. treaty of  September 24, 1819 (7 Stat. 203) - with the "Chippewa nation of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, March 25, 1820.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: September 24, 1819
Where or how concluded: Saginaw, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 203.
Tribe: Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: The Chippewa nation cede to the U. S. the land comprised within the following described boundaries, viz: Beginning at a point in the present Indian Boundary line, which runs due N. from the mouth of the great Auglaize river, 6 miles S. of the place where the base line so called intersects the same; thence W. 60 miles; thence in a direct line to the head of Thunder Bayriver; thence down the same, following the courses thereof to the mouth; thence NE. to the boundary line between the U. S. and the British Province of Upper Canada; thence with the same to the line established by the treaty of Detroit in 1807; thence with said line to the place of beginning.

From the foregoing general cession the Chippewa nation reserves for future use and occupancy the following described tracts:

1. One tract of 8,000 acres on the E. side of the river Au Sable, near where the Indians now live.

2. One tract of 2,000 acres on the river Mesagwisk

3. One tract of 6,000 acres on the N. side of the river Kawkawling at the Indian village.

4. One tract of 5,760 acres upon the Flint river, to include Reaum's village and a place called Kishkawbawee.

5. One tract of 8,000 acres on the head of the river Huron which empties into the Saginaw river at the village of Otusson.

6. One island in the Saginaw bay

7. One tract of 2,000 acres where Nabobask formerly lived

8. One tract of 1,000 acres near the island in Saginaw river.

9. One tract of 640 acres at the bend of the river Huron, which empties into the Saginaw river.

10. One tract of 2,000 acres at the mouth of Point Augrais river.

11. One tract of 1,000 acres on the river Huron, at Menoequet's village.

12. One tract of 10,000 acres on the Shawassee river, at a place called the Big Rock.

13. One tract of 3,000 acres on the Shawassee river at Ketchewaundaugenink.

14. One tract of 6,000 acres at the Little Forks on the Tetabawasink river.

15. One tract of 6,000 acres at the Black Bird's town on the Tetabawasink river.

16. One tract of 40,000 acres on the W. side of Saginaw river, to be hereafter located.

Historical data and remarks: This cession is overlapped by the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi cession of Aug. 29, 1821, and also by the Ottawa and Chippewa cession of Mar. 28, 1836.

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837. See note in this schedule opposite that treaty.

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14,1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837. This tract was at the date of this treaty supposed to lie within the limits of the general cession made by article 1, and was reserved on that theory. It was subsequently ascertained, however, that it was within the limits of the previous cession by the treaty of Nov. 17, 1807. It is therefore considered as a "grant" to the Indians from the U. S.

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Jan. 14, 1837

View maps: Michigan 1 ~ Michigan (Saginaw bay to Lake Erie) ~ Michigan 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 111~See 227~See 228~See 229~See 230~See 231~See 232~See 233~See 234~See 235~See 236~See 241~See 237~See 238~See 239~See 240~112


U.S. treaty of June 16, 1820 (7 Stat. 206) - with the "Chippeway tribe of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, March 2, 1821.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: June 16, 1820
Where or how concluded: Sault de Ste Marie, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 206.
Tribe: Chippewa

Description of cession or reservation: The Chippeway tribe cede to the U. S. the following tract of land: Beginning at the Big Rock in the river St Mary's on the boundary line between the U. S. and the British Province of Upper Canada, and running thence down the said river with the middle thereof to the Little Rapid; and from those points running back from the said river, so as to include 16 square miles of land.

The U. S. agree to secure to the Chippeways a perpetual right of fishing at the falls of St Mary's, and also a place of encampment upon the tract hereby ceded, convenient to the fishing ground, which place shall not interfere with the defenses of any military work which may be erected nor with private rights.

Historical data and remarks: This reserve was located in T. 47 N., R. 1 E., and comprised fractional sections 4, 5, and 6. It was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Aug. 2, 1855. It is too small to be shown on map.

View maps: Michigan (Saginaw bay to Lake Erie)
Designation of cession(s) on map: 112


U.S. treaty of July 6, 1820 (7 Stat. 207) - with the "Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, March 8, 1821.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: July 6, 1820
Where or how concluded: L'Arbre Croche and Michilimackinac, Michigaterritory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 207.
Tribe: Ottawa and Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: The Ottawa and Chippewa nations cede to the U. S. the St Martin islands in Lake Huron, containing plaster of paris.

View maps: Michigan 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 113


U.S. treaty of August 29, 1821 (7 Stat. 218) - with the "Ottawa, Chippewa, and Pottawatamie, Nations of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, March 25, 1822.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 29, 1821
Where or how concluded: Chicago, Illinois.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 218.
Tribe: Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi.

Description of cession or reservation: The foregoing nations of Indians cede to the U. S. the land comprehended within the following boundaries: Beginning at a point on the S. bank of the river St Joseph of Lake Michigan near the Parc anx Vaches, due N. from Rum's village, and running thence S. to a line drawn due E. from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan; thence with the said line E. to the tract ceded by the Pattiwatimies to the U. S. by the treaty of Fort Meigs in 1817 if the said line should strike said tract, but if the said line should pass N. of the said tract, then such line shall be continued until it strikes the western boundary of the tract ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Detroit in 1807, and from the termination of the said line, following the boundaries of former cessions, to the main branch of the Grand river of Lake Michigan, should any of the said lines cross the said river, but if none of the said lines should cross the said river, then to a point due E. of the source of the said main branch of the said river, and from such point due W. to the source of the said principal branch, and from the crossing of the said river or from the source thereof, as the case may be, down the said river on the N. bank thereof to the mouth; thence following the shore of Lake Michigan to the S. bank of the said river St Joseph at the mouth thereof and thence with the said S. bank to the place of beginning.

From the foregoing cession the said Indians reserve for their use the following tracts, viz:

1. One tract at Mang-ach-qua village, on the river Peble, of 6 miles square.

2. One tract at Mick-ke-saw-be of 6 miles square.

3. One tract at the village of Na-to-wa-se-pe of 4 miles square.

4. One tract at the village of Prairie Ronde of 3 miles square.

5. One tract at the village of Match-e-be-narh-she-wish, at the head of the Kekalamazoo river.

The U. S. grants from above cession 26 sections of land to individuals of Indian descent.

Historical data and remarks: This cession overlaps the trace ceded by the Chippewa by treaty of Sept. 24, 1819.

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827. The boundaries were never ascertained.

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 27, 1833

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827.

This reserve was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Sept. 19, 1827.

View maps: Michigan 1 ~ Michigan 1 ~ Indiana
Designation of cession(s) on map: 117~See 138~See 188


U.S. treaty with the Chippewa, Sioux, Sac and Fox, Menominee, Ipway, Winnebao, Ottawa and Potawattomie tribes (7 Stat. 272).
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 19, 1825
Where or how concluded: Prairie du Chien, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 272.
Tribe: Chippewa, Sauk and Fox, Menomini, Iowa, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomi living on the Illinois.

Description of cession or reservation: It is agreed between the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes and the Sioux that the line between their respective countries shall be as follows: Commencing at the mouth of the Upper Ioway river on the W. bank of the Mississippi and ascending the said Ioway river to its left fork; thence up that fork to its source; thence crossing the fork of Red Cedar river in a direct line to the second or upper fork of the Desmoines river; and thence in a direct line to the lower fork of the Calumet river, and down that river to its junction with the Missouri river. But the Yancton band of Sioux being principally interested in the establishment of the line from the forks of the Desmoines to the Missouri, and not being sufficiently represented to render the definitive establishment of that line proper, it is expressly declared that the line from the forks of the Desmoines to the forks of the Calumet river and down that river to the Missouri is not to be considered as settled until the assent of the Yancton band shall be given thereto; and if the said band should refuse their assent, the arrangement of that portion of the boundary shall be void.

The Sacs and Foxes relinquish to the other tribes interested therein all claim to land on the E. side of the Mississippi river.

The Ioways agree to the arrangement between the Sacs and Foxes and the Sioux, but it is agreed between the Ioways and the Sacs and Foxes that the Ioways have a just claim to a portion of the country between the boundary line above described and the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, and that the said Ioways and Sacs and Foxes shall peaceably occupy the same until some satisfactory arrangement can be made between them for a division of their respective claims to the country.

The Ottoes not being represented at this council, it is agreed that their claim to territory shall not be affected by anything herein.

It is agreed between the Sioux and the Chippewas that the line dividing their respective countries shall commence at the Chippewa river, half a day's march below the falls; and from thence it shall run to Red Cedar river, immediately below the falls; from thence to the St Croix river, which it strikes at a place called the Standing Cedar, about a day's paddle in a canoe above the lake at the mouth of that river; thence passing between two lakes, called by the Chippewas "Green lakes" and by the Sioux "The lakes they bury the eagles in," and from thence to the standing cedar that the Sioux split; thence to Rum river, crossing it at the mouth of a small creek called Choaking creek, a long day's march from the Mississippi; thence to a point of woods that projects into the prairie, half a day's march from the Mississippi; thence in a straight line to the mouth of the first river which enters the Mississippi on its W. side above the mouth of Sac river; thence ascending the said river (above the mouth of Sac river) to a small lake at its source; thence in a direct line to a lake at the head of Prairie river, which is supposed to enter the Crow Wing river on its S. side; thence to Otter Tail lake portage; thence to said Otter Tail lake and down through the middle thereof to its outlet; thence in a direct line so as to strike Buffalo river halfway from its source to its mouth and down the said river to Red river; thence descending Red river to the mouth of Outard or Goose creek. The eastern boundary of the Sioux commences opposite the mouth of Ioway river on the Mississippi, runs back 2 or 3 miles to the bluffs, follows the bluffs, crossing Bad Axe river to the mouth of Black river, and from Black river to a half day's march below the falls of Chippewa river.

It is also agreed between the Chippewas and Winnebagoes, so far as they are mutually interested therein, that the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country shall commence on the Chippewa river aforesaid, half a day's march below the falls of that river, and run thence to the source of Clear Water river, a branch of the Chippewa; thence S. to Black river; thence to a point where the woods project into the meadows, and thence to the Plover portage of the Ouisconsin.

It is agreed between the Winnebagoes and the Sioux, Sacs and Foxes, Chippewas and Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomies of the Illinois, that the Winnebago country shall be bounded as follows: Southeasterly by Rock river from its source near the Winnebago lake to the Winnebago village, about 40 miles above its mouth; westerly by the E. line of the tract lying upon the Mississippi herein secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie Indians of the Illinois; and also by the high bluff described in the Sioux boundary and running N. to Black river. From this point the Winnebagoes claim up Black river to a point due W. from the source of the left fork of the Ouisconsin; thence to the source of the said fork and down the same to the Ouisconsin; thence down the Ouisconsin to the portage and across the portage to Fox river; thence down Fox river to the Winnebago lake and to the Grand Kan Kanlin, including in their claim the whole of Winnebago lake; but, for the causes stated below, the line from Black river must for the present be left indeterminate.

The representatives of the Menominies not being sufficiently acquainted with their proper boundaries to settle the same definitely, and some uncertainty existing in consequence of the cession made by that tribe upon Fox river and Green Bay to the New York Indians, it is agreed between the Menominie tribe and the Sioux, Chippewas, Winnebagoes, Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie Indians of the Illinois, that the claim of the Menominies to any portion of the land within the boundaries allotted to either of the said tribes shall not be barred by any stipulation herein. It is, however, understood that the general claim of the Menominies is bounded on the N. by the Chippewa country, on the E. by Green Bay and Lake Michigan, extending as far S. as Millawankee river, and on the W. they claim to Black river.

The country secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie tribes of the Illinois is bounded as follows: Beginning at the Winnebago village on Rock river, 40 miles from its mouth, and running thence down the Rock river to a line which runs from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi and with that line to the Mississippi opposite to Rock Island; thence up that river to the U. S. reservation at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence with the S. and E. lines of the said reservation to the Ouisconsin; thence southerly passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock river at the Winnebago village. The Illinois Indians have also a just claim to a portion of the country bounded S. by the Indian boundary line aforesaid, running from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan, E. by Lake Michigan, N. by the Menominie country, and NW. by Rock river. This claim is recognized in the treaty with said Illinois tribes at St Louis, Aug. 24, 1816, but as the Millawaukee and Manetoowalk bands are not represented at this council it can not be now definitely adjusted

The reservations at Fever river, at the Ouisconsin, and St Peters, and the ancient settlements at Prairie des Chieus and Green Bay, and the land properly thereto belonging, and the reservations made upon the Mississippi for the use of the half-breeds in the treaty concluded with the Sacs and Foxes, Aug. 24, 1824, are not claimed by either of the said tribes.

The U. S. agree whenever the President may think proper, to convene such of the tribes as are interested in the lines left unsettled herein and to recommend to them an amicable and final adjustment of their respective claims. It is agreed, however, that a council shall be held with the Yancton band of the Sioux during the year 1826 to explain to them the stipulations of this treaty and to procure their assent thereto, and also with the Ottoes, to settle and adjust their title to any of the country claimed by the Sacs, Foxes, and Ioways.

Historical data and remarks: Their claim in this direction had already been relinquished by treaty of Nov. 3, 1804.

That portion of this boundary between the Sioux and Chippewa extending from Chippewa river to Otter Tail lake was surveyed in 1835 by S. L. Bean. From Otter Tail lake the line ran S. 4ø 43' E. 40¬ miles; S. 72ø 30' E. 62 miles to head of Wahtab river; down that river to its mouth; thence S. 72ø 15' E. 25« miles; thence N. 88ø E. 21 miles to Rum river; thence S. 25ø 24' E. 7 8/4 miles; thence S. 67ø E. 13 miles to Green lakes; thence S. 63ø E. 11 miles to St Croix river; thence S. 66ø 36' E. 47 miles to Red Cedar river; thence S. 59ø E. 20 miles to Chippewa river. In this survey, however, the head of Wahtab river was assumed to be a small lake in the N. E. corner of T. 124 N., R. 30 W., which is in reality the head of a tributary of that stream, the actual main source of the river being a number of miles to the SW.


U.S. treaty of August 5, 1826 (7 Stat. 290) - with the "Chippewa Tribe of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, February 7, 1827.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 5, 1826
Where or how concluded: Fond du Lac of Lake Superior.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 290.
Tribe: Chippewa

Description of cession or reservation: The Chippewa tribe fully assent to the treaty of Aug. 19, 1825, at Prairie du Chien.

It is agreed that a deputation shall be sent by the Chippewas to the treaty to be held in 1827 at Green Bay, with full power to arrange and fix the boundary line between the Chippewas and the Winnebagoes and Menomonees, which was left incomplete by the treaty of Prairie du Chien in consequence of the nonattendance of the principal Menomonee chiefs


U.S. treaty of August 11, 1827 (7 Stat. 303) - with the "Chippewa, Menomonie, and Winebago tribes of Indians."  U.S. proclamation, February 23, 1829.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 11, 1827
Where or how concluded: Butte des Morts, on Fox river in Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 303.
Tribe: Chippewa, Menomini, and Winnebago.

Description of cession or reservation: The southern boundary of the Chippeway country eastwardly from the Plover portage of the Ouisconsin having been left undefined by the treaty of Aug. 19, 1825, it is now agreed between the Chippeways, Menomonies, and Winebagoes, that the southern boundary of the Chippeway country shall run as follows, namely: From the Plover portage of the Ouisconsin on a northeasterly course to a point on Wolf river equidistant from the Ashawano and Post lakes of said river; thence to the falls of Pashaytig river of Green bay; thence to the junction of the Neesan Kootag or Burnt-wood river with the Menomonie; thence to the big island of the Shoskinaubic or Smooth-rock river; thence following the channel of said river to Green bay, which it strikes between the little and great Bay de Noquet.

It is agreed between the Menomonies and Winebagoes that so far as regards their interests the whole matter in dispute concerning the boundaries of the tract purchased by the New York Indians shall be referred to the President of the U. S. for final decision. And the President is authorized, on the part of the first-named tribes, to establish such boundaries between them and the New York Indians as he may consider equitable and just.

It is agreed between the Menomonees and the U. S. that the boundaries of the tracts formerly claimed by the French and British governments, the title to which is now vested in the U. S., shall be as follows: Beginning on the shore of Green bay, 6 miles due N. from the parallel of the mouth of Fox river, and running thence in a straight line, but with the general course of said river, and 6 miles therefrom, to the intersection of the continuation of the westerly boundary of the tract at the Grand Kaukanlin claimed by Augustin Grignion; thence on a line with the said boundary to the same; thence with the same to Fox river; thence on the same course 6 miles; thence in a direct line to the southwestern boundary of the tract marked on the plan of the claims at Green bay as the settlement at the bottom of the bay; thence with the southerly boundary of the said tract to the southeasterly corner thereof; and thence with the easterly boundary of the said tract to Green bay, provided that if the President of the U. S. shall be of opinion that the boundaries thus established interfere with any just claims of the New York Indians the President may then change the said boundaries in any manner he may think proper, so that the quantity of land contained in said tract be not greater than by the boundaries herein defined.

Historical data and remarks: This was accomplished by the Menomoni treaty of Feb. 8, 1831, as modified by treaty of Oct. 27, 1832.

The boundaries were modified by the President in pursuance of authority granted by this treaty.


U.S. treaty of August 25, 1828 (7 Stat. 315) - with the "Winnebago tribe and the United Tribes of Potawatamie, Chippewa and Ottawa Indians."  U.S. proclamation, January 7, 1829.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 25, 1828
Where or how concluded: Green Bay, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 315.
Tribe: Winnebago and united tribes of Potawatomi, Chippewa, and Ottawa.

Description of cession or reservation: It is agreed that the following shall be the provisional boundary between the lands of the U. S. and those of the foregoing tribes: The Ouisconsin river from its mouth to its nearest approach to the Blue Mounds: thence southerly, passing E. of the said mounds to the head of that branch of the Pocatolaka creek which runs near the Spotted Arm's village; thence with the said branch to the main forks of Pocatolaka creek; thence southeasterly to the ridge dividing the Winebago country from that of the Potawatamie, Chippewa, and Ottawa tribes; thence southerly with the said ridge to the line running from Chicago to the Mississippi, near Rock Island. And it is fully understood that the U. S. may freely occupy the country between these boundaries and the Mississippi river until a treaty shall be held with the Indians for its cession.

It is further agreed that a ferry may be established over the Rock river where the Fort Clark road crosses the same, and also a ferry over the same river at the crossing of the Lewiston road.


U.S. treaty of July 29, 1829 (7 Stat. 320) - with the "United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitoouck Rivers."  U.S. proclamation, Jauary 2, 1830.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: July 29, 1829
Where or how concluded: Prairie du Chien, Michigan territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 320.
Tribe: Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi nations of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitowoc rivers.

Description of cession or reservation: The aforesaid nations hereby cede to the U. S. all the lands comprehended within the following limits, viz: Beginning at the Winnebago village, on Rock river, 40 miles from its mouth, and running thence down Rock river to a line which runs due W. from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river, and with that line to the Mississippi river opposite to Rock Island; thence up that river to the U. S. reservation at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence with the S. and E. lines of said reservation to the Ouisconsin river; thence southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock river aforesaid at the Winnebago village, the place of beginning.

2. Also one other tract of land, described as follows, to wit: Beginning on the western shore of Lake Michigan, at the NE. corner of the field of Antoine Ouitmette, who lives near Gross Pointe, about 12 miles N. of Chicago; thence running due W. to the Rock river aforesaid; thence down the said river to where a line drawn due W. from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan crosses said river; thence E. along said line to the Fox river of the Illinois; thence along the northwestern boundary line of the cession of 1816 to Lake Michigan; thence northwardly along the western short of said lake to the place of beginning.

From the foregoing cessions the following reservations are made, viz:

1. For Wau-pon-eh-see, 5 sections of land at the Grand Bois on Fox river of the Illinois, where Shaytee's village stands.

2. For Shab-eh-nay, 2 sections at his village near the Paw-Paw grove.

3. For Awn-kote, 4 sections at the village of Saw-meh-naug, on the Fox river of the Illinois.

4. Also 15 sections of land for various individuals.

Historical data and remarks: This cession covers a portion of the tract ceded by the Sauk and Fox Nov. 3, 1804, but it was retroceded by the U. S. to the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi Aug. 24, 1816. See treaty of that date.

Ceded to the U. S., Sept. 26, 1833. Boundaries not ascertained.

Granted to reservee and his heirs in fee simple by treaty of Sept. 26, 1833.

Ceded to the U. S. Sept. 26, 1833. Boundaries not ascertained.

View maps: Wisconsin 1 ~ Illinois 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 147~148


U.S. treaty of September 26, 1833 (7 Stat. 431) - with the "United Nation of Chippewa, Ottowa and Potawatamie Indians ... being fully represented by the Chiefs and Head-men whose names are hereunto subscribed."  U.S. proclamation, February 21, 1835.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: September 26, 1833
Where or how concluded: Chicago, Illinois.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 431.
Tribe: Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi.

Description of cession or reservation: The united nation of Chippewa, Ottowa, and Potawatamie Indians cede to the U. S. all their land along the western shore of Lake Michigan and between this lake and the land ceded to the U. S. by the Winnebago nation at the treaty of Fort Armstrong, made on Sept. 15, 1832, bounded on the N. by the country lately ceded by the Menominees and on the S. by the country ceded at the treaty of Prairie du Chien, made on July 29, 1829, supposed to contain about 5,000,000 acres.

In part consideration of the above cession the U. S. agree to grant to said Indians a tract of country W. of the Mississippi river, to be assigned to them by the President of the U. S., to be not less than 5,000,000 acres, and to be located as follows: Beginning at the mouth of Boyer's river, on the E. side of the Missouri river; thence down the said river to the mouth of Naudoway river; thence due E. to the W. line of the state of Missouri; thence along the said state line to the NW. corner of the state; thence E. along the said state line to the point where it is intersected by the western boundary line of the Sacs and Foxes, thence N. along the said line of the Sacs and Foxes, so far as that when a straight line shall be run therefrom to the mouth of Boyers river (the place of beginning) it shall include 5,000,000 acres.

The U. S. agree to pay $2,000 to Wau-pon-eh-see and his band for the 5 sections of land reserved to them by treaty of July 29, 1829.

The U. S. agree to pay $1,500 to Awn-kote and his band for the 4 sections of land reserved to them by treaty of July 29, 1829.

Historical data and remarks: The boundaries of this tract were altered by resolution of the U. S. Senate while that body had the approval of the treaty under consideration, which resolution bore date of May 22, 1834. The Indians did not consent to this modification in strict conformity with the resolution of the Senate, but under date of Oct. 1, 1834, still further changed the boundaries so as to read as follows: Beginning at the mouth of Boyer's river; thence down the Missouri river to a point thereon from which a due E. line would strike the NW. corner of the state of Missouri; thence along the said E. line to the NW. corner of said state; thence along the northern boundary line of Missouri till it strikes the line of the lands of the Sac and Fox Indians; thence northwardly along said line to a point from which a W. line would strike the sources of the Little Sioux river; thence along said W. line till it strikes the said sources of said river; thence down said river to its mouth; thence down the Missouri river to the beginning, provided the said boundary shall contain 5,000,000 acres; but should it contain more, then said boundaries are to be correspondingly reduced. This change of boundaries was approved by the Senate. The tract thus bounded was ceded to the U. S. by treaty of June 5 and 17, 1846.

Boundaries not ascertained.

Boundaries not ascertained.

View maps: Wisconsin 1 ~ Illinois 2 ~ Iowa 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 187~See 265


U.S. treaty of March 28, 1836 (7 Stat. 491) - with the "Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians, by their chiefs and delegates."  U.S. proclamation, May 27, 1836.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: March 28, 1836
Where or how concluded: Washington D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 491.
Tribe: Ottawa and Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: The Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians cede to the U. S. all the tract of country within the following boundaries: Beginning at the mouth of Grand river of Lake Michigan on the N. bank thereof and following up the same to the line called for in the first article of the treaty of Chicago of Aug. 29, 1821; thence in a direct line to the head of Thunder Bay river; thence with the line established by the treaty of Saganaw of Sept. 24, 1819, to the mouth of said river; thence NE. to the boundary line in Lake Huron between the U. S. and the British province of Upper Canada; thence northwestwardly following the said line as established by the commissioners acting under the treaty of Ghent, through the straits, and river St Mary's to a point in Lake Superior N. of the mouth of Gitchy Seebing or Chocolate river; thence S. to the mouth of said river and up its channel to the source thereof; thence in a direct line to the head of the Skonawba river of Green bay; thence down the S. bank of said river to its mouth; thence in a direct line through the ship channel into Green bay to the outer part thereof; thence S. to a point in Lake Michigan W. of the North cape or entrance of Grand river, and thence E. to the place of beginning at the cape aforesaid, comprehending all the lands and islands within these limits not hereinafter reserved.

From the foregoing cession said tribes reserve for their own use, to be held in common, the following tracts for the term of five years and no longer except by permission of the U. S.:

1. One tract of 50,000 acres to be located on Little Traverse bay.

2. One tract of 20,000 acres to be located on the N. shore of Grand Traverse bay.

3. One tract of 70,000 acres to be located on or N. of the Pieire Marquetta river.

4. One tract of 1,000 acres to be located by Chingassanoo or the Big Sail, on the Cheboigan.

5. One tract of 1,000 acres to be located by Mujeekewis, on Thunder Bay river.

There shall also be reserved for the Chippewas living N. of the straits of Michilimackinac the following tracts, viz:

1. One tract of 3 miles square on the N. shore of said straits between Point-au-Barbe and Mille Coquin river, including the fishing grounds in front thereof.

2. One tract of 3 miles square on the N. shore of said straits between Point-au-Barbe and Mille Coquin river, including the fishing grounds in front thereof.

3. The Beaver islands of Lake Michigan for the use of the Beaver Island Indians.

4. Round island opposite Michilimackinac as a place of encampment for the Indians.

5. The islands of the Chenos with a part of the adjacent N. coast of Lake Huron corresponding in length and 1 mile in depth.

6. Sugar island, with its islets, in the river of St Mary's.

7. Six hundred and forty acres at the mission of the Little Rapids.

8. A tract commencing at the mouth of Pississowining river, S. of Point Iroquois; thence running up said stream to its forks; thence westward in a direct line to the Red Water lakes; thence across the portage to the Tacquimenon river and down the same to its mouth, including the small islands and fishing grounds in front of this reservation.

9. Six hundred and forty acres on Grand island

10. Two thousand acres on the mainland S. of Grand island.

11. Two sections on the northern extremity of Green bay, to be located by a council of chiefs.

It is understood that the reservation for a place of fishing and encampment made under the treaty of St Mary's of June 16, 1820, remains unaffected by this treaty.

It is agreed that as soon as the said Indians desire it, a deputation shall be sent to the W. of the Mississippi river, and to the country between Lake Superior and the Mississippi, to select a suitable place for the final settlement of said Indians, which the U. S. will forever guarantee and secure to said Indians.

Historical data and remarks: This cession overlaps the Chippewa cession by treaty of Sept. 24, 1819

The general note below applies to this reserve.

Surveyed in 1840. It comprised fractional Tps. 28, 29, and 30 N., R. 10 W., and continued to be occupied as an Indian reservation until the reserves contemplated by treaty of July 31, 1855, were designated.

Surveyed in 1840 on Manistee river and occupied as a reservation until 1848, when it was sold.

GENERAL NOTE.--After the selection by Mr Schoolcraft of the 20,000 and 70,000 acre reserves under this treaty, he was advised that the U. S. might conclude to allow the Indians to remain on the other reserves after the expiration of the five years. He was therefore instructed, Nov. 5, 1840, that the boundaries of all the reserves under this treaty ought to be marked. Aug. 23, 1844, the Indian Office advised the General Land Office that these reserves ought not to be surveyed as public lands, the Indians having been tacitly allowed to remain thereon since the treaty.

In 1845 the assent of the Indians was obtained for the extension of the public surveys over these reserves, but no definite boundaries were marked out for them.

As late as June 7, 1850, the Indian Office notified the General Land Office that the Indians still occupied these tracts and the latter must not be offered for sale as public lands. This state of affairs, in fact, continued until other provision was made by the treaty of 1855.

View maps: Michigan 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 205~206~207


U.S. treaty of May 9, 1836 (7 Stat. 503) - with the "chiefs of the Swan-creek and Black-river bands of the Chippewa nation, residing within the limits of Michigan."  U.S. proclamation, May 25, 1836.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: May 9, 1836
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 503.
Tribe: Swan-creek and Black-river bands of the Chippewa nation residing in Michigan.

Description of cession or reservation: The Swan-creek and Black-river bands of Chippewas cede to the U. S. the following tracts, reserved for them by treaty of Nov. 17, 1807, viz:

1. One tract of 3 miles square, or 5, 760 acres, on Swan creek, of Lake St Clair.

2. One tract of 1 8/4 sections near Salt creek of said lake.

3. One tract of one-fourth of a section at the mouth of the river Au Vaseau, contiguous to the preceding cession.

4. One tract of 2 sections near the mouth of Black river, of the River St Clair.

The U. S. agree to furnish said Indians 8,320 acres, or 13 sections, of land W. of the Mississippi or NW. of St Anthony's falls, to be located by an agent or officer of the Government.

Historical data and remarks: This tract really contained only 534 acres. See remarks under treaty of Nov. 17, 1807.

This tract really contained 262.7 acres. See remarks under treaty of Nov. 17, 1807.

This tract really contained only 1,200 acres. See remarks under treaty of Nov. 17, 1807.

View maps: Michigan 1 ~ Kansas 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 214~215~216~217~See 417, 418


U.S. treaty of January 14, 1837 with the Saginaw Band (7 Stat. 528) - with the "Saganaw tribe of the Chippewa nation, by their chiefs and delegates, assembled in council."  U.S. proclamation, July 2, 1838.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: January 14, 1837
Where or how concluded: Detroit, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 528.
Tribe: Saginaw tribe of the Chippewa nation.

Description of cession or reservation: The said tribe cede to the U. S. the following tracts of land lying within the boundaries of Michigan viz:

1. One tract of 8,000 acres on the river Au Sable.

2. One tract of 2,000 acres on the Misho-wusk or Rifle river.

3. One tract of 6,000 acres on the N. side of the river Kawkawling.

4. One tract of 5,760 acres upon Flint river, including the site of Reaums village and a place called Kishkawbawee.

5. One tract of 8,000 acres on the head of the Cass (formerly Huron) river, at the village of Otusson.

6. One island in the Saganaw bay, estimated at 1,000 acres, being the island called Shaingwaukokaug, on which Mukokoosh formerly lived.

7. One tract of 2,000 acres at Nababish on the Saganaw river.

8. One tract of 1,000 acres on the E. side of the Saganaw river.

9. One tract of 640 acres at Great Bend on Cass river.

10. One tract of 2,000 acres at the mouth of Point Augrais river.

11. One tract of 1,000 acres on the Cass river at Menoquet's village.

12. One tract of 10,000 acres on the Shiawassee river at Ketchewaundaugumink or Big Lick.

13. One tract of 6,000 acres at the Little Forks on the Tetabwasing river.

14. One tract of 6,000 acres at the Black Bird's town on the Tetabwasing river.

15. One tract of 40,000 acres on the W. side of the Saganaw river.

16. One tract of 10,000 acres at Big Rock on Shiawassee river.

The said Indians shall have the right of living upon the tracts at the river Augrais and Musho-wusk or Rifle rivers on the W. side of Saganaw bay, for the term or five years, during which time no white man shall be allowed to settle on said tracts under a penalty of $500.

The said tribe agrees to remove from the state of Michigan as soon as a proper location can be obtained, either W. of lake Superior or at such place W. of the Mississippi and SW. of the Missouri river as the legislation of Congress may indicate.

The U. S. agree to pay to said tribe as one of the parties to the treaty of Nov. 17, 1807, the sum of $1,000 to quiet their claim to two reservations of land of 2 sections each, lying in Oakland county, Mich., which were ceded to the U. S. by the Pottowattomies of St Joseph's on Sept. 19, 1827.

Historical data and remarks: When the public surveys were extended over this region, there were no Indians living on this tract, and, the surveyors having no one to point out to them the desired limits of the reserve, it was never surveyed as an Indian reserve.

The Indians reserved a right of residence on this tract for five years

The Indians reserved a right of residence on this tract for five years

See note concerning this tract under treaty of Sept. 24, 1819. An error was made in copying the treaty whereby this reserve became confused with the one at Big Rock. The intention was to cede both the 3,000-acre tract at Ketchewaundaugumink or Big Lick and the 10,000-acre tract at Big Rock. The language of the treaty cedes "10,000 acres on Shiawassee river, at Ketchewaundaugumink or Big Lick." To correct this error a supplemental article to the treaty was concluded Oct. 27, 1841.

See note concerning this tract opposite No. 12. or 3,000-acre reserve at Ketchewaundaugumink or Big Lick.

By treaty of Dec. 20, 1837, a reserve was promised this tribe on Osage river, but they declined to remove thereto, and no tract was therefore surveyed for them.

See treaty of Sept. 19, 1827.

View maps: Michigan 1 ~ Michigan 2 ~ Michigan 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 227~228~229~230~231~232~233~234~235~236~237~238~239~240~241


U.S. treaty of July 29, 1837 (7 Stat. 536) - with the "Chippewa nation of Indians, by their chiefs and headmen."  U.S. proclamation, June 15, 1838.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: July 29, 1837
Where or how concluded: St. Peter's (at the confluence of St Peter's and Mississippi rivers), in Wisconsin territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 536.
Tribe: Chippewa

Description of cession or reservation: The said Chippewa nation cede to the U. S. the tract of country bounded as follows, viz: Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers, between 20 and 30 miles above where the Mississippi is crossed by the 46ø of N. latitude, and running thence to the N. point of Lake St Croix, one of the sources of the St Croix river; thence to and along the dividing ridge between the waters of Lake Superior and those of the Mississippi to the sources of the Ocha-sua-sepe, a tributary of the Chippewa river; thence to a point on the Chippewa river 20 miles below the outlet of Lake De Flambeau; thence to the junction of the Wisconsin and Pelican rivers; thence on an E. course 25 miles; thence southerly on a course parallel with that of the Wisconsin river to the line dividing the territories of the Chippewas and Menomonies; thence to the Plover portage; thence along the southern boundary of the Chippewa country to the commencement of the boundary line dividing it from that of the Sioux, half a day's march below the falls on the Chippewa river; thence with said boundary line to the mouth of Wah-tap river at its junction with the Mississippi, and thence up the Mississippi to the place of beginning.

View maps: Minnesota 1 ~ Wisconsin 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 242


U.S. treaty of December 20, 1837 with the Saginaw band (7 Stat. 547) - with the "Saganaw tribe of Chippewas."  U.S. proclamation, July 2, 1838.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: December 20, 1837
Where or how concluded: Flint River, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 547.
Tribe: Saginaw tribe of Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: The U. S. agree to reserve a location for said tribe on the head waters of the Osage river, in the country visited by a delegation of the said tribes during the present year, to be of proper extent agreeably to their numbers, embracing a due proportion of wood and water and lying contiguous to tribes of kindred language. Nor shall anything contained in the sixth article of the treaty of Jan. 14, 1837, entitle them at this time to a location in the country W. of Lake Superior.

Historical data and remarks: The Indians refused to remove, and the reserve promised on Osage river was not set apart for them.


U.S. treaty of January 23, 1838 with the Saginaw band (7 Stat. 565) - with the "several bands of the Chippewa nation cmprehended within the district of Saganaw."  U.S. proclamation, July 2, 1838.


U.S. treaty of February 7, 1839 with the Saginaw band (7 Stat. 578) - with the "Saganaw tribes of Chippewa."  U.S. proclamation, March 2, 1839.


U.S. treaty of October 4, 1842 with the Chippewa of the Mississippi and Lake Superior (7 Stat. 591) - with the "Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi, and Lake Superior, by their chiers and headmen."  U.S. proclamation, March 23, 1843.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: October 4, 1842
Where or how concluded: La Pointe of Lake Superior, in Wisconsin territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume VII, page 591.
Tribe: Chippewa of the Mississippi and lake Superior.

Description of cession or reservation: The Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior cede to the U. S. all the country within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the mouth of Chocolate river of Lake Superior; thence northwardly across said lake to intersect the boundary line between the U. S. and the Province of Canada; thence up said Lake Superior to the mouth of the St Louis or Fond du Lac river (including all the islands in said lake); thence up said river to the American Fur Company's trading post at the southwardly bend thereof about 22 miles from its mouth; thence S. to intersect the line of the treaty of July 29, 1837, with the Chippewas of the Mississippi; thence along said line to its southeastwardly extremity near the Plover portage on the Wisconsin river; thence northeastwardly along the boundary line between the Chippewas and Menomonees, to its eastern termination (established by the treaty held with the Chippewas, Menomonees, and Winnebagoes at Butte des Morts, Aug. 11, 1827), on the Skonawby river of Green bay; thence northwardly to the source of Chocolate river; thence down said river to its mouth, the place of beginning; it being the intention of the parties to this treaty to include in this cession all the Chippewa lands eastwardly of the aforesaid line running from the American Fur Company's trading post on the Fond du Lac river to the intersection of the line of the treaty made with the Chippewas of the Mississippi, July 29, 1837.

View maps: Wisconsin 1 ~ Michigan 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 261


U.S. treaty of August 2, 1847 with the Chippewas of the Missippi and Lake Superior (7 Stat. 904) - with the "Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, by their chiefs and head-men."  U.S. proclamation, April 7, 1848.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 2, 1847
Where or how concluded: Fond du Lac of Lake Superior.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume IX, page 904.
Tribe: Chippewa of the Mississippi and lake Superior.

Description of cession or reservation: Cede tract within the following boundaries: Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers; thence up the Crow Wing river to the junction of that river with the Long Prairie river; thence up the Long Prairie river to the boundary line between the Sioux and Chippewa Indians; thence southerly along said boundary line to a lake at the head of Long Prairie river; thence in a direct line to the sources of the Watab river; thence down the Watab river to the Mississippi river; thence up the Mississippi to the place of beginning.

Also all the interest and claim which the said Indians, parties to this treaty, have in a tract of land lying upon and N. of Long Prairie river and called One day's hunt.

Historical data and remarks: As the boundary line between these Indians and the Pillager was indefinite, it was agreed that the U. S. should not occupy this tract until this line should be defined and settled to the satisfaction of the Pillager.

View maps: Minnesota 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 268


U.S. treaty of August 21, 1847 with the Pillager band (7 Stat. 908) - with the "Pillager band of Chippewa Indians, by their chiefs, head-men, and warriors."  U.S. proclamation, April 7, 1848.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 21, 1847
Where or how concluded: Leech Lake
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume IX, page 908.
Tribe: Chippewa (Pillager band).

Description of cession or reservation: Cede tract within the following boundaries: Beginning at the south end of Otter-Tail lake; thence southerly on the boundary line between the Sioux and Chippewa Indians to Long Prairie river; thence up said river to Crow Wing river; thence up Crow Wing river to Leaf river; thence up Leaf river to the head of said river; and from thence in a direct line to the place of beginning.

View maps: Minnesota 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 269


U.S. treaty of September 30, 1854 wth the Chippewas of the Mississippi and Lake Superior (10 Stat. 1109) - with the "Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior and the Mississippi, by their chiefs and head-men."  U.S. proclamation, January 29, 1855.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: September 30, 1854
Where or how concluded: La Pointe, Wisconsin.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume X, page 1109.
Tribe: Chippewa of lake Superior and the Mississippi.

Description of cession or reservation: Chippewas of Lake Superior cede to the U. S. all the lands heretofore owned by them in common with the Chippewas of the Mississippi river E. of the following boundary: Beginning at a point where the E. branch of Snake river crosses the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country; running thence up the said branch to its source; thence nearly N. in a straight line to the mouth of East Savannah river; thence up the St Louis river to the mouth of East Swan river; thence up the East Swan river to its source; thence in a straight line to the most westerly bend of Vermillion river; thence down the Vermillion river to its mouth.

The U. S. set apart and reserve for the Chippewas of Lake Superior the following tracts of land:

1. For the L'Anse and Vieux de Sert bands, all unsold lands in townships in Michigan, 51 N., R. 33 W.; 51 N., R. 32 W.; E. 1/2 50 N., R. 33 W.; W. 1/2 50 N., R. 32 W.; and all of 51 N., R. 31 W., lying W. of Huron bay.

2. For the La Pointe band, a tract bounded as follows: Beginning on the S. shore of Lake Superior, a few miles W. of Montreal river, at the mouth of a creek called by the Indians Ke-che-se-be-we-she; running thence S. to a line drawn E. and W. through the center of T. 47 N.; thence W. to the W. line of said township; thence S. to the SE. corner of T. 46 N., R. 32 W.; thence W. the width of 2 townships; thence N. the width of 2 townships; thence W. 1 mile; thence N. to the lake shore; thence along the lake shore, crossing Shag-waw-me-quon point to the place of beginning.

3. Also 200 acres on the northern extremity of Madeline island for a fishing ground.

4. For the other Wisconsin bands, a tract lying about Lac de Flambeau, equal in extent to 3 townships.

The U. S. set apart and reserve for the Wisconsin bands of Chippewa the following tract of land:

5. A tract on Lac Court Orielles, equal in extent to three townships, the boundaries to be determined.

6. For the Fond du Lac bands, a tract bounded as follows: Beginning at an island in the St Louis river above Knife portage, called by the Indians Paw-paw-sco-me-me-tig; running thence W. to the boundary line heretofore described; thence N. along said boundary line to the mouth of Savannah river; thence down the St Louis river to the place of beginning. If said tract contains less than 100,000 acres, a strip sufficient to make this amount shall be added to the S. side.

7. For the Grand Portage band, a tract bounded as follows: Beginning at a rock a little to the E. of the eastern extremity of Grand Portage bay; thence along the lakeshore to the mouth of a small stream called by the Indians Maw-ske-gwaw-caw-maw-se-be, or Cranberry Marsh river; thence up said stream across the point to Pigeon river; thence down Pigeon river to a point opposite the starting point; thence across to the place of beginning.

8. For the Ontonagon and La Pointe bands, each 4 sections, to be selected near the lake shore.

9. Also 1 section for Chief Buffalo, to be selected from the ceded land.

10. Each mixed-blood head of a family entitled to select 80 acres.

11. Bois Porte band to have right to select reservation hereafter on same terms as above-named bands.

Historical data and remarks: An Executive order was issued Mar. 7, 1855, formally withdrawing these lands from market. This order covered, among other lands, the whole of T. 51 N., R. 31 W., instead of only that part of it W. of Huron bay.

Although the part E. of Huron bay was subsequently relinquished, the Indians claimed compensation for it, which was granted them by act of Congress, June 22, 1874.

This tract constitutes the present La Pointe or Bad River reserves.

Surveyed by A. C. Stuntz in 1863, as originally selected, and bounded by crimson lines. An alteration was made in the boundaries by order of the Secretary of the Interior June 22, 1866. The reserve as altered is colored yellow. By act of Congress May 29, 1872, provision was made for the sale of the reserve and the removal of the Indians, with their consent, to Bad River reservation. The Indians refused to give their assent to removal and the law was not carried into effect.

Selection for this reserve approved, by the Secretary of the Interior Mar. 1, 1873, and remainder of lands which were withdrawn Nov. 22, 1859, and Apr. 4, 1865, were restored to the public domain. See act of Congress, May 29, 1872. The reserve as originally selected and surveyed in 1863 by A. C. Stuntz is bounded by crimson lines. The reserve as finally approved by the Secretary of the Interior is colored yellow.

See act of Congress, May 29, 1872. Under this act the reserve was appraised and offered for sale on the representation that the Indians had given their consent. The Indians, however, with few exceptions refused to remove, declaring that their alleged assent to the sale of the reserve was fraudulent, and the project of removal failed.

This constitutes the present Grand Portage reserve.

These lands were designated by Executive order Sept. 25, 1855, and comprised lots 1, 2, 3, and 4 of secs. 14 and 15; SW. 1/4 and SW. 1/4 SE. 1/4 sec. 15; secs. 22 and 23; N. 1/2 sec. 26 and N. 1/2 sec. 27; all in T. 53 N., R. 38 W.

An addition of 18 sections to this reservation as originally selected was made by Executive order in 1856. The original reservation is colored red; the added portion is colored yellow.

Scrip was issued which entitled, these mixed-bloods to locate 80 acres of land each.

This reservation was partially selected by them at Vermilion lake, but its boundaries were never accurately located and defined, and by treaty of Apr. 7, 1866, they ceded all claim to it.

View maps: Minnesota 1 ~ Michigan 2 ~ Wisconsin 2 ~ Minnesota 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 332~333~334~335~336~337~338~339~340~341, 342


U.S. trreaty of February 22, 1855 with the Pillager, Lake Winnebagoshish and Mississippi bands (10 Stat. 1165) - with "the following-named chiefs and delegates, representing the Mississippi bands of Chippewa Indians, viz: Pug-o-na-ke-shick, or Hole-in-the-day; Que-we-sans-ish, or Bad Boy; Wand-e-kaw, or Little Hill; I-awe-showe-we-ke-shig, or Crossing Sky; Petud-dunce, or Rat’s Liver; Mun-o-min-e-kay-shein, or Rice-Maker; Mah-yah-ge-way-we-durg, or the Chorister; Kay-gwa-daush, or the Attempter; Caw-caug-e-we-goon, or Crow Feather; and Show-baush-king, or He that passes under Everything, and the following-named chiefs and delegates representing the Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands of Chippewa Indians, viz: Aish-ke-bug-e-koshe, or Flat Mouth; Be-sheck-kee, or Buffalo; Nay- bun-a-caush, or Young Man’s Son; Maug-e-gaw-bow, or Stepping Ahead; Mi-gi-si, or Eagle, and Kaw-be-mub-bee, or North Star, they being thereto duly authorized by the said bands of Indians respectively."  U.S. proclamation, April 7, 1855.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: February 22, 1855
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume X, page 1155.
Tribe: Chippewa of the Mississippi.

Description of cession or reservation: Cede tract within the following boundaries: Beginning at a point where the E. branch of Snake river crosses the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country E. of the Mississippi as established by treaty of July 29, 1837; thence up the said branch to its source; thence nearly N. in a straight line to the mouth of East Savannah river; thence up the St Louis river to the mouth of East Swan river; thence up said river to its source; thence in a straight line to the most westwardly bend of Vermillion river; thence northwestwardly in a straight line to the first and most considerable bend in the Big Fork river; thence down said river to its mouth; thence down Rainy Lake river to the mouth of Black river; thence up that river to its source; thence in a straight line to the northern extremity of Turtle lake; thence in a straight line to the mouth of Wild Rice river; thence up Red river of the North to the mouth of Buffalo river; thence in a straight line to the southwestern extremity of Otter Tail lake; hence through said lake to the source of Leaf river; thence down said river to its junction with Crow Wing river; thence down Crow Wing river to its junction with the Mississippi; thence to the commencement on said river of the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country as established by treaty of July 29, 1837; thence along said line to the place of beginning. Also all interest they may have in any other lands in Minnesota or elsewhere.

Reserve tract at Mille Lac as follows: Fractional Ts. 42 N., R. 25 W.; 42 N., R. 26 W.; 42 and 43 N., R. 27 W. Also the three islands in the southern part of Mille Lac.

Reserve tract at Rabbit lake, beginning at a point half mile E. of Rabbit lake; thence S. 3 miles; thence westwardly in a straight line to a point 3 miles S. of the mouth of Rabbit river; thence N. to the mouth of said river; thence up the Mississippi river to a point directly N. of the place of beginning; thence S. to the place of beginning.

Reserve tract at Gull lake, beginning at a point half mile SW. from the most southwestwardly point of Gull lake; thence due S. to Crow Wing river; thence down said river to the Mississippi; thence up said river to Long Lake portage; thence in a straight line to the head of Gull lake; thence in a southwestwardly direction as nearly in a direct line as practicable, but no point thereof at less distance than half mile from said lake to the place of beginning.

Reserve tract at Pokagomon lake as follows: The boundaries to be as nearly as practicable at right angles, and so as to embrace within them Pokagomon lake: but nowhere to approach nearer said lake than half a mile therefrom.

Reserve a tract at Sandy lake, beginning at the mouth of Sandy Lake river; thence S. to a point on an E. and W. line 2 miles S. of the most southern point of Sandy lake: thence E. to a point due S. from the mouth of West Savannah river; thence N. to the mouth of said river: thence N. to a point on an E. and W. line 1 mile N. of the most northerly point of Sandy lake; thence W. to Little Rice river; thence down said river to Sandy Lake river; thence down said river to the place of beginning.

Reserve the islands in Rice lake and one-half section of land on said lake.

Reserve 1 section for Hole-in-the-day.

Reserve tract at Leech lake for Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands, beginning at the mouth of Little Boy river; thence up said river to Lake Hassler; thence through the center of said lake to its western extremity; thence in a direct line to the most southern point of Leech lake; thence through said lake so as to include all the islands therein to the place of beginning.

Reserve tract at Winnibigoshish lake for Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands, beginning at a point where the Mississippi river leaves Lake Winnibigoshish; thence N. to the head of the first river; thence W. by the head of the next river to the head of the third river, emptying into said lake; thence down the latter to said lake; thence in a direct line to the place of beginning.

Reserve tract at Cass lake for Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands, beginning at the mouth of Turtle river; thence up said river to the first lake; thence E. 4 miles; thence southwardly in a line parallel with Turtle river to Cass lake; thence so as to include all the islands in said lake to the place of beginning.

Missionaries and others legally residing in ceded country to have the privilege of purchasing 160 acres each.

Half-breeds to have 80 acres each.

Right of way granted for roads.

Historical data and remarks: The E. branch of Snake river (the point of beginning of this cession) did not rise so far N. as was believed, but had its head S. of the cession line of 1837, so that this cession begins at a point on the line of 1837, due N. of head of E. branch of Snake river.

This tract was not, as at first supposed, within the limits of the cession by this treaty, but was within the limits of a tract already ceded by treaty of July 29, 1837. Conditionally ceded by treaty of May 7, 1864. See that treaty.

Ceded by treaty May 7, 1864. Included with Sandy Lake reserve.

Enlarged by Executive orders Nov. 4, 1873, and May 26, 1874. The original reserve as herein provided for is colored green on Minnesota map No. 1, and is numbered 358. The original reserve is also shown in connection with the additions by Executive orders of Nov. 4, 1873 (No. 550) and May 26, 1874 (No. 567), on Minnesota map No. 2, the former being colored mauve and the latter two yellow.

Enlarged by Executive order of May 26, 1874. The original reserve as herein provided for is colored green on Minnesota map No. 1, and is numbered 359. The original reserve is also shown in connection with the addition by Executive order of May 26, 1874 (No. 568), on Minnesota map No. 2, the former being colored mauve and the latter blue.

This reserve still retains its original boundaries

View maps: Minnesota 1 ~ Minnesota 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 357~See 454~See 456~See 453~See 457~See 455~358~359~360


U.S. treaty of July 31, 1855 with the Ottawa and Chippewa of Michigan (11 Stat. 621) - with "the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, parties to the treaty of March 28, 1836."  U.S. proclamation, September 10, 1856.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: July 31, 1855
Where or how concluded: Detroit, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XI, page 621.
Tribe: Ottawa and Chippewa of Michigan.

Description of cession or reservation: U. S. set apart for six bands near Sault Ste Marie all unsold public lands in secs. 13, 14, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, and 28, T. 47 N., R. 5 W.; secs. 18, 19, and 30, T. 47 N., R. 4 W.; secs. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23, 25, and 26, T. 47 N., R. 3 W.; sec. 29, T. 47 N., R. 2 W.; secs. 2, 3, 4, 11, 14 and 15, T. 47 N., R. 2 E.; sec 34, T. 48 N., R. 2 E.; secs. 6, 7, 18, 19, 20, 28, 29, and 33, T. 45 N., R. 2 E.; secs. 1, 12, and 13, T. 45 N., R. 1 E., and sec. 4, T. 44 N., R. 2 E.

U. S. set apart for bands who wish to reside E. of Mackinac straits all unsold public lands in T. 42 N., Rs. 1 and 2 W.; T. 43 N., R. 1 W.; T. 44 N., R. 12 W.

U. S. set apart for Beaver Island band High island and Garden island in Lake Michigan, being fractional Ts. 38 and 39 N., R. 11 W.; T. 40 N., R. 10 W., and in part 39 N., Rs. 9 and 10 W.

U. S. set apart for Cross and Middle Village, L'Arbrechroche, Bear Creek bands, et al. certain unsold public lands as follows: Ts. 34 to 39 (inclusive) N., R. 5 W.; Ts. 34 to 38 (inclusive) N., R. 6 W.; Ts. 34, 36, and 37 N., R. 7 W., and all that part of T. 34 N., R. 8 W., lying N. of Pine river.

U. S. set apart for Grand Traverse bands certain unsold public lands described in amendment as follows: Ts. 29, 30, 31 N., R. 11 W.; Ts. 29, 30, 31 N., R. 12 W., and the E. 1 1/2 T. 29 N., R. 9W.

U. S. set apart for Grand River bands certain unsold public lands described in amendment as follows: T. 12 N., R. 15 W., and Ts. 15, 16, 17, and 18 N., R. 16 W.

U. S. set apart for Cheboygan band certain unsold public lands, described in amendment as follows: Ts. 35, 36 N., R. 3 W.

U. S. set apart for Thunder Bay bands certain unsold public lands, as follows: Secs. 25 and 36, T. 30 N., R. 7 E., and sec. 22, T. 30 N., R. 8 E.

U. S. agree to purchase from Methodist Missionary Society sufficient land for Indians desiring to settle at Iroquois Point.

All land within these reserves remaining unassigned after ten years to be sold by U. S., as in case of other public lands.

Historical data and remarks: In anticipation of this treaty an Executive order was issued, May 14, 1855, temporarily withdrawing from market for Indian purposes certain townships on the shore of Lake Michigan, in the vicinity of Little Traverse bay. A portion only of these townships was reserved by the treaty and the remainder, not being needed for Indian purposes, was subsequently restored to market in 1860. The townships thus restored were 33 to 39 (inclusive) N. of R. 4 W.; T. 33 N. of Rs. 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 W., and that part of T. 34 N., R. 8 W., lying S. of Pine river. By Executive orders of Aug. 9, 1855, Sept. 10, 1855, and Apr. 21, 1856, all the lands described in the treaty, not previously included in Executive order of May 14, 1855, together with sundry additional tracts thought necessary for the use of these Indians, were withdrawn from market. The tracts thus withdrawn, in addition to those described in the treaty, were T. 32 N., Rs. 10 and 11 W.; T. 29 N., R. 13 W., and Ts. 11 and 12 N., Rs. 16, 17, and 18 W. Subsequently, by Executive order of Apr. 16, 1864, Ts. 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, and 39 N., R. 4 W., and Ts. 34, 37, 38, and 39 N., R. 3 W., were withdrawn from market with a view to consolidating the Ottawa and Chippewa on the Little Traverse reservation, including these latter tracts, but this policy was abandoned, and the order revoked by Executive order of Feb. 14, 1874. Individual allotments were made to the Ottawa and Chippewa (the lists being, however, several times revised and readjusted), as provided for in the treaty, the tribal organization was dissolved, the allotted lands were patented to the allottees, and the surplus was restored to the public domain by act of Congress, approved June 10, 1872, and amended by act of Congress, May 23, 1876.

See act of Congress of June 10, 1872, amended by act of May 23, 1876.

View maps: Michigan (region about Mackinac and Detroit)
Designation of cession(s) on map: 375, 376, 377, 378, 379~380, 381~382, 383~384~385~386, 387, 388, 389~390, 391, 392~393~394, 395


U.S. treaty of August 2, 1855 with the Chippewa of Sault Ste. Marie (11 Stat. 631) - "with the Chippewa Indians of Sault Ste. Marie."  U.S. proclamation, April 24, 1856.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 2, 1855
Where or how concluded: Detroit, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XI, page 631.
Tribe: Chippewa of Sault Ste Marie.

Description of cession or reservation: Surrender right of fishing and encampment at the falls of St. Mary's secured by treaty June 16, 1820.

U. S. give Chief O-shaw-waw-no a small island in St Mary's river, containing one-half acre.

Historical data and remarks: This tract was in T. 47 N., R. 1 E., comprising fractional secs. 4., 5, and 6, lying along Sault Ste Marie river within the village limits of Sault Ste Marie. It is too small to be indicated on the map.

The grant is too small to be noted on the map.


U.S. treaty of August 2, 1855 with Saginaw band (11 Stat. 633) - with "that portion of the band of Chippewa Indians of Swan Creek and Black River, parties to the treaty of May 9, 1836, and now remaining in the State of Michigan."  U.S. proclamation, June 21, 1856.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: August 2, 1855
Where or how concluded: Detroit, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XI, page 633.
Tribe: Chippewa of Saginaw, Swan creek, and Black river (parties to treaties of Jan. 14, 1837, and May 9, 1836).

Description of cession or reservation: U. S. set apart all unsold public lands in six adjoining townships in Isabella county, Michigan.

U. S. set apart all unsold public lands in Ts. 17 and 18 N., Rs. 3, 4, and 5 E.

Historical data and remarks: In anticipation of this treaty the President, by Executive order, May 14, 1855, withdrew from market the whole of Ts. 13, 14, 15, and 16 N., Rs. 3, 4, 5, and 6 W. After the selection of the six townships provided by treaty the remainder were restored to market. See treaty of Oct. 18, 1864.

These townships were formally withdrawn from market by Executive order, Apr. 21, 1856. Ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Oct. 18, 1864.

View maps: Michigan 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 396~See 464


U.S. treaty of July 16, 1859 (12 Stat. 1105) - with "the following-named delegates representing the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewas and the Munsee or Christian Indians, they being duly authorized thereto by said Indians, viz: Eshton-quit, or Francis McCoonse, Edward McCoonse, William Turner, Antwine Gokey, Henry Donohue, Ignatius Caleb, and John Williams."  U.S. proclamation, July 9, 1860.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: July 16, 1859
Where or how concluded: Sac and Fox agency, Kansas territory.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XII, page 1105.
Tribe: Chippewa of Swan creek and Black river, and Munsee or Christian.

Description of cession or reservation: Swan Creek and Black River Chippewas and the Munsee or Christian Indians become united as one band.

A portion of reserve by treaty of May 9, 1836, not exceeding 7 sections to be retained as future home.

Remainder of tract reserved by treaty of May 9, 1836, to be sold by the U. S. in trust for their benefit.

Historical data and remarks: The interest in this reservation was purchased for the Munsee or Christian Indians in pursuance of authority conferred by act of Congress of June 8, 1858.

In two segregated tracts, with No. 417 lying between them

View maps: Kansas 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 417~418


U.S. treaty of March 11, 1863 with the Mississippi, Pillager, and Lake Winnebagoshish bands (12 Stat. 1249) - :for and on behalf of the Chippewas of the Mississippi and the Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands of Chippewa Indians in Minnesota."  U.S. proclamation, March 19, 1863.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: March 11, 1863
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XII, page 1249.
Tribe: Chippewa of Mississippi and Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands of Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: This treaty was canceled and superseded by the treaty of May 7, 1864.


U.S. treaty of October 2, 1863 with the Red Lake and Pembina bands (13 Stat. 667) - with "the Red Lake and Pembina bands of Chippewas; by their chiefs, head-men, and warriors."  U.S. proclamation, May 5, 1864.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: October 2, 1863
Where or how concluded: Old crossing of Red Lake river, Minnesota.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XIII, page 667.
Tribe: Chippewa (Red Lake and Pembina bands).

Description of cession or reservation: Cede tract within following boundaries: Beginning at the point where the international boundary between the U. S. and British Possessions intersects the shore of the Lake of the Woods; thence in a direct line southwestwardly to the head of Thief river; thence down the main channel of said river to its mouth, on Red Lake river; thence in a southeasterly direction in a direct line toward the head of Wild Rice river to the point where such line would intersect the northwestern boundary of a tract ceded to the U. S. by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855, by the Pillager and Lake Winnebigoshish bands; thence along said boundary line to the mouth of Wild Rice river; thence up the main channel of Red river to the mouth of the Shayenne; thence up the main channel of Shayenne river to Poplar Grove; thence in a direct line to the Place of Stumps, otherwise called Lake Chicot; thence in a direct line to the head of the main branch of Salt river; thence in a direct line due N. to the point where such line would intersect the international boundary; thence eastwardly along said boundary to the place of beginning.

Half-breeds and mixed bloods to be entitled to 160 acres each out of ceded lands.

One section each reserved for Moose Dung and Red Bear.

Unceded lands still retained by them

Historical data and remarks: This cession is overlapped by the Sisseton and Wahpeton cession of Sept. 20, 1872, and also by a small SE. corner of the Devils Lake reserve, established by treaty of Feb. 19, 1867.

View maps: Minnesota 1 ~ Dakota 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 445~446


U.S. treaty of April 12, 1864 with the Red Lake and Pembina bands (13 Stat. 689) - with the "Red Lake and Pembina bands of Chippewa Indians, by their chiefs, head-men, and warriors, conlcuded at the City of Washington, District of Columbia ..."  U.S. proclamation, April 25, 1864.


U.S. treaty of May 7, 1864 with the Mississippi, Pillager, and Lake Winnibagoshish bands (13 Stat. 693) - with "the Chippewa chief Hole-in-the-day, and Mis-qua-dace, for and on behalf of the Chippewas of the Mississippi, and Pillager and Lake Winnebagoshish bands of Chippewa Indians in Minnesota."  U.S. proclamation, March 20, 1865.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: May 7, 1864
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XIII, page 693.
Tribe: Chippewa of the Mississippi, and Pillager and Lake Winnibigoshish bands of Chippewa.

Description of cession or reservation: Cede to the U. S. the Gull Lake reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855, except one-half section granted to Rev. Jno. Johnson and H. Day.

Cede to the U. S. the Mille Lac reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855, except one section granted to Shaw-voshkung.

Cede to U. S. the Sandy Lake reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855, except one section granted to Mis-qua-dace.

Cede to the U. S. the Rabbit Lake reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855.

Cede to the U. S. the Pokagomin Lake reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855.

Cede to the U. S. the Rice Lake reservation established by treaty of Feb. 22, 1855.

The U. S. set apart for the Chippewas of the Mississippi all lands in following boundaries except the reservations described in third clause of article 2 of treaty of Feb. 22, 1855: Beginning at a point 1 mile S. of the most southerly point of Leach lake; thence in an easterly course to a point 1 mile S. of the most southerly point of Goose lake; thence due E. to a point due S. from the intersection of the Pokagomin reservation and the Mississippi river; thence on the dividing line between Deer river and lakes and Mashkordens river and lakes until a point is reached N. of the first-named river and lakes; thence in a direct line northwesterly to the outlet of Two Routs lake; thence in a southwesterly direction to Turtle lake; thence southwesterly to the head water of Rice river; thence northwesterly along the line of the Red Lake reservation to the mouth of Thief river; thence down the center of the main channel of Red Lake river to a point opposite the mouth of Black river; thence southeasterly in a direct line with the outlet of Rice lake to a point due W. of place of beginning; thence to the place of beginning.

Historical data and remarks: By article 12 the Mille Lac Indians were not to be compelled to surrender their reserve so long as they refrained from molesting the persons and property of the whites, and they still continue to occupy it.

Included with the Sandy lake reserve.

A portion of this reserve was ceded by treaty of Mar. 19, 1867.

View maps: Minnesota 1 ~ Minnesota 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 453~454~455~456~457


U.S. treaty of October 18, 1864 with the Saginaw band (14 Stat. 657) - with "the Chippewas of Saginaw, Swan Creek, and Black River, in the State of Michigan aforesaid, parties to the treaty of August 2d, 1855."  US. proclamation August 16, 1866.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: October 18, 1864
Where or how concluded: Isabella, Michigan.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XIV, page 657.
Tribe: Chippewa of Saginaw, Swan creek, and Black river in Michigan.

Description of cession or reservation: Relinquish the land on Saginaw bay reserved to them by treaty of Aug. 2, 1855.

Relinquish right to purchase unselected lands in Isabella reservation and of locating lands in lieu of lands sold by U. S. upon said reserve.

U. S. set apart for them all unsold land in the six townships in Isabella county reserved to them by treaty of Aug. 2, 1855, as follows: N. 1/2 T. 14, and Ts. 15, 16 N., R. 3 W.; the N. 1/2 T. 14, and T. 15 N., R. 4 W.; and Ts. 14, 15 N., R. 5 W.

View maps: Michigan 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 464~See 396


U.S. treaty of April 7, 1866 with the Bois Fort band (14 Stat. 765) - with the "Bois Forte band of Chippewa Indians ... by the undersigned chiefs, head-men, and warriors of said bands."  U.S. proclamation, May 5, 1866.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: April 7, 1866
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XIV, page 765.
Tribe: Chippewa (Bois Forte band.)

Description of cession or reservation: Cede all claim to land everywhere and especially to reserve held by them at Vermillion lake.

U. S. agree to set apart a reservation of not less than 100,000 acres for their future home.

Also reserve of one township on Grand Fork river, at mouth of Deer creek if such location be found practicable.

Sundry grants to individuals.

Historical data and remarks: This reserve was provided for by treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, and although partially selected and occupied, its boundaries were never accurately defined.

This was laid off so as to include Nett lake.

No formal designation of this reserve was made until June 30, 1883, when its boundaries were defined by Executive order.

View maps: Minnesota 1
Designation of cession(s) on map: 482~483~484


U.S. treaty of March 19, 1867 with the Mississippi band (16 Stat. 719) - with the "Chippewas of the Mississippi, represented by Que-we-zance, or Hole-in-the-Day, Qui-we-shen-shish, Wau-bon-a-quot, Min-e-do-wob, Mijaw-ke-ke-shik, Shob-osk-kunk, Ka-gway-dosh, Me-no-ke-shick, Way-namee, and O-gub-ay-gwan-ay-aush."   U.S. proclamation, April 18, 1867.
        According to Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894:

Date: March 19, 1867
Where or how concluded: Washington, D. C.
Reference: Statutes at Large, Volume XVI, page 719.
Tribe: Chippewa of the Mississippi.

Description of cession or reservation: Cede lands secured to them by article 2, treaty of May 7, 1864, except portion hereinafter defined.

Reserve a tract within the following boundaries: Commencing at a point on Mississippi river opposite the mouth of Wanoman river, as laid down on Sewall's map of Minnesota; thence due N. to a point 2 miles further N. than the most northerly point of Lake Winnebagoshish; thence due W. to a point 2 miles W. of the most westerly point of Cass lake; thence S. to Kabekona river; thence down said river to Leech lake; thence along the N. shore of Leech lake to its outlet in Leech Lake river; thence down the main channel of said river to its junction with the Mississippi river; thence down the Mississippi to the place of beginning.

Reserve such portion of their western outlet as falls within the reservation set apart by article 2 of this treaty.

Set apart reservation of 36 townships, to include White Earth lake and Rice lake.

Historical data and remarks: This cession comprised two separate tracts. Afterward portions of it were again set apart for the Indians by Executive orders, as follows: Oct. 29, 1873, a tract as an addition to the Lake Winnebagoshish reservation, bounded by yellow lines and numbered 549; Nov. 4, 1873, a tract as an addition to the Leech Lake reservation, bounded by yellow lines and numbered 550; May 26, 1874, a tract as a second addition to the Leech Lake reservation, bounded by yellow lines and numbered 567, and May 26, 1874, a tract as a second addition to the Lake Winnebagoshish reservation, bounded by yellow lines and numbered 568. Thus, it will be observed, the entire cession by this treaty of Mar. 19, 1867, is numbered 507, and shown by solid crimson color, while Nos. 549, 550, 567, and 568, which are within its limits, are simply indicated by yellow boundary lines.

Addition established by Executive order of Oct. 29, 1873. This addition was made from the tract previously ceded by the first article of this treaty. See also second addition, by Executive order of May 26, 1874.

See Executive order of Mar. 18, 1879, making an addition to this reserve. Also Executive order of July 13, 1883, revoking order of Mar. 18, 1879. Under authority of act of Congress of Mar. 3, 1873, one township of the White Earth reserve was purchased for the use of the Pembina band of Chippewa. T. 144 N., R. 42 W., was selected by Special Agent Luce, Feb. 14, 1883, for this purpose.

View maps: Minnesota 2
Designation of cession(s) on map: 507~508~509


U.S. agreement with the Red Lake band of August 23, 1886 (not ratified)

U.S. agreement with the White Earth, Pillager and Lake Winnebagoshish bands - August 11, 1886

U.S. agreement with the Turtle Mountain band of Chippewas, October 2, 1892 (33 Stat. 189)

U.S. agreement with the Red Lake band of Chippewas, March 10, 1902 (33 Stat. 46)


1. list of U.S. treaties compiled by the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 927 15th Street, N.W., Suite 612, Washington, D.C. 20005, May 1974
2. U.S. and Canadian federal treaties and agreements with 'Chipepwa' Indians
3. list of Canadian treaties from Indian and Northern Affairs, Canada.