Minutes of councils held by James McLaughlin, United States Indian Inspector, with the Indians of Red Lake Agency, Minnesota, from March 4th to March 10th, 1902, for Cession of land.
1902 cession of 11 western townships, Red Lake Indian reservation, "council proceedings," page 31

 

-31-

homestead.

In township 149 of range 33 there are twenty-seven homesteads taken, that township contains about the sane amount of timber, that is each homestead has all the way from 150,000 to 1,000,000 feet of standing pine to each claim.

There were also some homesteads in the Battle River Country that were classed as agricultural land, that estimated about 20,000,000 feet of pine on said homesteads.

There is another place called Shotley Brook where there are homesteads taken; all of which had pine on them but we only know of the amount that stood on three of said claims.

There was a man named Cowan who had a claim in that section of country that had 1,800,000 feet of pine standing on his homestead.

In that same section of country another man took a homestead, Dan Shaw by name, and there was 1,300,000 feet of standing pine on his claim.

There is another man who took a homestead in the same district. Pat Milan by name, that got over 2,000,000 feet of pine from it.

All these that we have mentioned, as having contained so much pine timber, were classed by the appraisers as agricultural lands and were thus secured by the settlers at only $1.25 per acre.

This is all that we can put down on paper.  It would take us two days, perhaps more, to figure up and state all the cases of like character.  The claims we speak of were all upon the ceded Red Lake reservation.

There is something that we want to ask you about what you said to us day before yesterday.  The Red Lake Indians understood you to gay that they owned simply half of their reservation, and that the whites owned the other half, and this is a question that we want to place before you and we would like to find out the reason our Great Father



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