Minutes of councils held by James McLaughlin, United States Indian Inspector, with the Indians of Red Lake Agency, Minnesota, from March 4th to March 10th, 1902, for Cession of land.
1902 cession of 11 western townships, Red Lake reservation, proceedings of McLaughlin councils, page 18

-18-

into Clear-water river; thence following up the Clearwater river to intersect a line commencing at Big Marsh and directly west to the Clearwater river; thence from the Big Marsh in a southeasterly direction to Rush Lake} thence from Rush Lake in an easterly direction to intersect in a direct line a point one mile from the most easterly extremity of Lower Red Lake. And from the point one mile from the most easterly point of Lower Red Lake in a direct line due north to a point one mile south of the south shore of the Upper Red Lake; thence east one mile clear around the east end of Upper Red Lake, where it would intersect a line commencing at the Little Creek branching off from Thief River, about seven miles from the mouth of Thief River.

The understanding of the treaty of 1889 was that we were to derive $1.25 per acre for all the agricultural lands that were ceded to the United States.   And we understand that there has not been a dollar paid for these lands yet.  And we understand that we were to derive $3.00 per thousand feet for all of the pine that was sold on the ceded reservation, and we understand that there has been over 600,000,000 feet of pine cut from the reservation that we ceded. We find that we haven't derived more than 65¢ per thousand feet for all this timber, calculating at 600,000,000. And there is lots of pine left standing that has not been cut on the lands that we ceded to the United States.   And we were given to understand that we had the use of any ceded land that was not occupied by settlers, to be used as our own.   And we furthermore reserved the privilege of using that as our hunting grounds as in former years.    And we were given to understand that the Secretary of the Interior was to appoint men, good and honest, to estimate the timber upon the land that wa,8 ceded to the United States.  Now for an example of their estimating this timber.   There was one lumber concern, Shevlin & Carpenter, bought 70,000,000 feet of this timber, as estimated by these estimators,

 



< HOME >
< INDEX >
< NEXT >